The Instigator
Ed_Chen
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
proton4000
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Is Apple Software superior to Microsoft's/Google's?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/20/2015 Category: Technology
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 579 times Debate No: 70436
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
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Ed_Chen

Pro

This is a conformation
I will be arguing for why Apple's software is superior to all Windows/Android
My opponent will be against
proton4000

Con

I have accepted this challenge.
Debate Round No. 1
Ed_Chen

Pro

Firstly, I would like to thank my opponent in accepting this challenge

In this round we will be arguing about iOS and Android.

I was unable to put any photos on this debate because I was using Chrome. Instead, I have provided links to the photos for reference.

iOS and Android both have their advantages and disadvantages, but the advantages of iOS outweigh the advantages with Android by miles.

With sleeker designs than the plain design of Android, better notification alerts and the benefits of multitasking, the advantage of customization, and security, iOS clearly surpasses android by a landslide.

My Arguments

1)The Lock and Home screen are much more simplistic and have many more features

2)Customization

3)Notification simplicity, quicker controls,applications, and the recent apps screen

4)Security

1)Firstly, the lock screen on iOS has many more features that are helpful to the use in a simplistic way. For example, whenever you receive a notification or a text message, the device will light up the screen for a second whereas on an Android the only signal is a not so helpful signal light that can be easily blocked by a pocket or a purse as Nick T. quotes on http://www.phonearena.com... causes the screen of an iOS 8device to light up for several seconds, thus letting the user read it instantly. This won't happen on Android 5.0, but instead, a notification LED light will go off, if available.”This would prove as a unhelpful feature of a Android device for the light would not be easily seen. Secondly, as one can see throughout their experience using Android, all the notifications, keyboards and other side functions will usually turn white, giving the contrast to the background which is not as favorable as the translucent password lock, keyboard, notification center, and recent apps screen, as Nick T. quotes on phonearena,"The iOS 8 home screen can be described as minimalist and intuitive to navigate. The parallax effect applied to the wallpaper brings the interface to life and the translucency effects seen with certain UI elements and screens look very cool indeed.”Lastly, the folders on Android are limited to 16 apps whereas the folders on iOS are virtually unlimited.

http://www.debate.org...;
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(These are probably the most meaningful photos, but to view my whole photo album go here
http://www.debate.org...)

2)Both of these softwares have many widgets and are customizable to the user’s choice. For instance, Android provides many widgets that are made by themselves. On the other hand, iOS users have the freedom of downloading and using third party widgets which gives a wider range of choice including widgets from Yahoo, Google, and much more. Also, Android widgets are only accessible on the page where you put them. On the opposite hand, all iOS widgets are placed on the little tab that can be accessed by swiping down form the top as Gordon Kelly quotes on Forbes,”They let an Android user make the most of their home screen real estate. With iOS 8, however, iPhone and iPad users can enjoy third-party widgets as well. In fact, they're better in a way – iOS widgets are placed in the pull-down panel, which makes them accessible at any time, from any screen.”

3)In iOS 8, if you pull down the top of the screen you will see where all your widgets are placed, and the notifications you have which are sorted by application all which is translucent and resting in front of a tinted background. Also by simply double clicking the home button you will see the “recent app” screen which shows you all the apps you have recently accessed as well as the symbol of the app listed below and a list of recent contacts that you have contacted located right above, so there is easier access to the people who you have chatted with. Also, if you directly tap on a notification , you will then have the ability of direct notification replies as Nick T. quotes on phonearena,"Notification bubbles appear on the icons of apps that have unread notifications, and that's a neat trick Android might want to learn from iOS one day. In addition, pulling down the panel from the top displays the Today tab, which lists whatever widgets are enabled – our daily schedule, our reminders, the weather forecast, to give a few examples. Notifications are in their own separate tab, grouped by application, and the priority by which these are listed can be changed from the settings menu. The recent apps list in iOS 8 is the better solution, in our opinion – it is simple, yet functional. Apps listed chronologically along with their respective icons on a separate row below, while a list of our recent and favorite contacts is placed at the top. The latter is a unique feature and can be extremely handy.”and as Gordon Kelly quotes on Forbes.

Secondly, the connectivity of apple software is also much greater than android’s. For example, when your mac and your phone share the same Apple id, you are able to directly call someone from your mac, and can also check your health kit, a health tracker on iOS8. With many other functions such as handoff, i Cloud drive and AirDrop, the connectivity of Apple’s software clearly surpasses Android and Window’s as Jay McGregor quotes on Forbes,"That said where iOS does excel is in its newly launched ‘Continuity’ functionality. This allows users to ‘hand-off’ calls, messaging and more to different devices (notably only Apple hardware), depending on which you are using at any one time. Yes much of Android is founded on Cloud-based continuity (emails, calendar appointments, remote app installation, Hangouts messaging, etc) which works smoothly across OS X, Chrome OS and Windows, but Apple has taken a step ahead here.”

4)Lastly, the Security on iOS is much higher because of its fingerprint scanner. I am fully aware that Android also has a fingerprint scanner, but it is much worse than the Android since you need to place your full finger on the screen which makes it much more difficult to operate with one hand whereas Touch id can sense your finger however which way you tilt it. It is also extremely hard to get your finger in the same position every time as Evan Kryperos says on Trusted Reviews,” Apple introduced Touch ID with the iPhone 5S and it was a revelation. Keeping your phone secure has never been easier. And it’s even better in the iPhone 6. The extra processing power of the A8 system on a chip means that your phone unlocks in record time and iOS 8 unleashed the TouchID API on to the developer community, so we now have apps, like 1Password, that open with the touch of your thumb. The extra processing power of the A8 system on a chip means that your phone unlocks in record time. Samsung added a fingerprint scanner to the S5 but it doesn’t work anywhere near as well as Apple’s implementation. Rather than resting your finger on the scanner you are forced to wipe it over the button which is tricky when using it one handed. It’s also a lot more sensitive to the direction of your finger or thumb so you’ll often need multiple attempts to unlock. Out of 10 attempts, we were only accepted into the Galaxy S5 on three of those, while the iPhone unlocked perfectly every time. If the S6 is going to come with a similar method for unlocking, we hope it’s much improved, or else we’ll just end up turning it straight off.

Souces:

Gorden Kelly Forbes:http://www.forbes.com...

http://www.forbes.com...

Nick T. Phonearena:http://www.phonearena.com...

Evan Kypreos(the best):http://www.trustedreviews.com...

proton4000

Con

First, I would like to point out that the iOS parallax effect is no more than a gimmick; it doesn't help the user at all. Also, Android widgets can also be made by other companies (e.g. a widget for Flipboard.) A good replacement for a widget could be an actual notification, like a new story on a followed feed on Flipboard or a new article on Seeking Alpha.

In iOS, the notifications center is not self-explanatory. When you swipe down, you get something more of a hub of some sort rather than a real notification center. Notifications are also sorted by application. Once again, the translucent background is another gimmick. It doesn't help the user in any way.

We have to look at the big picture. "Will a user use this?" Will someone need to handoff a conversation from an iPhone to a Mac? The answer is no. It might be useful to be able to call someone from a Mac and handoff to an iPhone, but considering that the Mac isn't mobile enough might make someone rethink this.

The fingerprint scanner only improves security on iOS in the way that you're the "only one" who can unlock your phone. Nope! Cats have repeatedly gotten in to the Touch ID system. Fingerprints can be duplicated from pictures, as shown by German researchers (on Mashable, VentureBeat, Gizmodo, the Wall Street Journal, and many other news sources... http://venturebeat.com...)

Just because Android phones don't have such a security feature doesn't mean that they are insecure. Face recognition is a feature that has yet to be implemented (the liveness blinking check would take a very long time to be implemented by Apple) and the pattern lock still hasn't been done in iOS.

Now it's time for me to argue.
1. iOS devices are made by only one company. Your choices are iPhones only.
2. You can install apps remotely.
3. Users can install custom launchers, like Aviate or Nova Launcher.
4. You can have multiple users.
5. Android apps are coded with Java, which is much more familiar to people.

1. iOS devices are made by only one company. Your choices are iPhones only.
Apple is the only company who is allowed to make devices with iOS on them. However, Android has a number of different vendors like Samsung, LG, HTC, and ASUS. This allows me to have choice. What is even better is that within these vendors, you have multiple phones. Take Samsung. I can go for a more premium finish like the Galaxy Alpha or I can just have a big screen with a stylus with the Galaxy Note 4. If I want something cheaper, I can get a Huawei or Xiaomi phone. If I want something more expensive with a good camera, I can get an HTC One X. Even then, Windows Phone has good choices (the topic of this debate is also against Microsoft and Google.) The 41-megapixel Nokia Lumia 1020 is a sure choice for the aspiring photographer who just wants a phone.

2. You can install apps remotely (and even uninstall and update.) [1] (http://techcrunch.com...)
I've used this feature numerous times. If my mom has my tablet, I don't have to take it from her and wait for it to install. I can quietly get on my computer and install whatever I want to get. On Apple devices, you MUST be on the device to get the app. Although this might raise concerns about security, that would be saying that your email is insecure.

3. Users can install custom launchers, like Aviate or Nova Launcher.
The ability to even customize the launcher itself is already amazing. The fact that launcher development tools are readily available is even better. This allows for more customization than just that simple home screen with every app. It can help provide an overview of your day without having to swipe.

4. You can have multiple users.
This is good if you have apps that another user doesn't need. Unlike iOS, this isn't one-size-fits-all. This is a real account system, like on a computer. Think of it as a computer with less computing power, a better touchscreen, and portability.

5. Android apps are coded with Java, which is more familiar to people.
Apple has only recently made the switch to a more modern programming language, Swift. Even then, it has snippets of unfamiliar syntax like the "func" keyword and the "let" keyword. Java, however, has been around for much longer and has many more people that understand it, including me. It just makes more sense.

Maybe you'll reconsider your opinion on iOS.
Debate Round No. 2
Ed_Chen

Pro


Firstly, I would like to point out that my opponents rebuttals are all not supported by any source or website except for the third one. Therefore, all the statements of his claims are currently invalid.



As my opponent quotes in his first paragraph, "First, I would like to point out that the iOS parallax effect is no more than a gimmick; it doesn't help the user at all.” Although that may be partially true in the eyes of some people, many believe the quality of a phone’s software are not only its capabilities but also the looks and appearance that appear with the software. As the pictures I have posted on my previous argument show, the style of the software does make a big difference in the overall style of the software.



Next, my opponent quotes in one of his rebuttals,” In iOS, the notifications center is not self-explanatory. When you swipe down, you get something more of a hub of some sort rather than a real notification center. Notifications are also sorted by application. Once again, the translucent background is another gimmick. It doesn't help the user in any way.” Firstly, the notification does not only need to have only notifications. With widgets and many other side buttons, it optimizes an user’s experience on iOS. Also, I would like to state that the Android notification center is NOT sorted by application as you can see in the pics in the previous argument.



Also, where my opponent quotes,"Fingerprints can be duplicated from pictures, as shown by German researchers (on Mashable, VentureBeat, Gizmodo, the Wall Street Journal, and many other news sources...http://venturebeat.com...;)” he does not realize the amount of work the researches had to undergo throughout the video to unlock a phone. After all, who’s going to take that much time to unlock your phone? Also Android may have more ways of security functions but the face recognition can be easily passed with a simple photo.



Lastly, as my opponent states in one of his other rebuttals ,"We have to look at the big picture. "Will a user use this?" Will someone need to handoff a conversation from an iPhone to a Mac? The answer is no. It might be useful to be able to call someone from a Mac and handoff to an iPhone, but considering that the Mac isn't mobile enough might make someone rethink this.” Firstly, he has no proof that the answer is “No”. Secondly, the connectivity from a Mac to an iPhone i.e. Handoff, iCloud Drive, Air Drop, Apple ID, and etc. includes many other functions other than Handoff. Also, when you get home/your phone’s battery dies, handoff would be really helpful.



Assuming that my opponent has not posted any other rebuttals, I am assuming that he has agreed with all the other arguments that I have posted.


Also, for his arguments….




  1. I must remind you that we are arguing about the SOFTWARE not the PRODUCT DESIGN. Also, the increased number of vendors also means the more confusion an Android User can get himself into. The iPhone6’s camera is also very good compared to most windows phones if one uses it the RIGHT WAY.

  2. IOS has that function too. Through the same Apple ID, users are allowed to set on a function in Settings that will sync every app you download on your other devices. But after all, that is not what makes a software great or outstanding, it is just a small little feature that is practically useless.

  3. That is possible ion iOS devices too, but I must admit is not as established as Android’s. Having said this, I would like to point out that there are some Custom Launchers on iOS that are far better than Android’s.

  4. You can also sign into another Apple ID to get into another account with the same device. It is as established as Android’s.

  5. The majority of software users do not make apps, but just utilize them. Thus it does not matter whether it is Java or not. Also, the apps on iOS are much better as the link states in my previous argument. Also, Swift is actually quite easy once you get the hang of it.



I am fully aware that this argument was supposed to include Windows/Mac but I have published this in a rush for there is less content than the first one. My opponent can start arguing about Mac in his Round 3 argument and it will continue from there until the end of Round 2


:D


proton4000

Con

Rebuttals:

"After all, who"s going to take that much time to unlock your phone?" Anyone. Especially for high-profile individuals. Also, the face recognition can utilize a liveness check, as I said in my earlier argument. It requires you to blink. A photo cannot blink.

"Firstly, he has no proof that the answer is 'No'. Secondly, the connectivity from a Mac to an iPhone i.e. Handoff, iCloud Drive, Air Drop, Apple ID, and etc. includes many other functions other than Handoff. Also, when you get home/your phone"s battery dies, handoff would be really helpful." You don't have proof that your answer is Yes, either. You only provide scenarios.

"Also, the increased number of vendors also means the more confusion an Android User can get himself into." Choice is something good in this case. Want a cheap phone? Covered. Want a phone that just works? Covered. Want a phone for the brand? Covered. In the iPhone, you only have two choices (at the time of this writing, the 6 and 6+.)

"I would like to point out that there are some Custom Launchers on iOS that are far better than Android"s." Unfortunately, you have to jailbreak the device. Also, you cannot jailbreak an iPad legally (http://www.cultofmac.com...). To be honest, there are good choices for iOS. However, it is better and easier to install a custom launcher on Android. If you don't want to jailbreak and risk voiding your warranty or messing up your phone, you can just download a launcher from the Play Store on Android.

"The majority of software users do not make apps, but just utilize them. Thus it does not matter whether it is Java or not. Also, the apps on iOS are much better as the link states in my previous argument. Also, Swift is actually quite easy once you get the hang of it." Apple doesn't have quite the reputation when it comes to programming languages. Swift is C-like and bears slight resemblance to Objective-C. Objective-C seemed unnatural in development for a language in 2013. And although the majority of software users do just utilize them, you also have to think of the developer's perspective. Also, you have no proof that the apps on iOS are much better.

This ends the debate over iOS and Android. Debate starts over OS X vs. Windows.

1. Windows 10 has a visually appealing UI, as The Verge says in this article: http://www.theverge.com... (and PC World as well: http://www.pcworld.com...)
2. Cortana on Windows 10 will be an amazing feature, considering how well Cortana is at voice recognition and other things (http://www.theverge.com...)
3. Windows 10 is still Windows. The interface is more lively in general (point #1)
4. The start menu is back, and this time it's better than before... http://www.extremetech.com...

I was in a rush posting this as well because I had to leave. I won't go too much in depth.
Debate Round No. 3
Ed_Chen

Pro

Sorry I cannot debate
proton4000

Con

The forfeit is accepted. I would like to thank my opponent for such a great debate when it was happening and for forfeiting gracefully.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by simonstuffles 2 years ago
simonstuffles
You should put this in the unvoted debates thread on the forum if you want some votes.
No votes have been placed for this debate.