The Instigator
CONORMCGREGOR123
Pro (for)
Tied
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The Contender
McDavid
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Is Batman a superhero

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/10/2017 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 510 times Debate No: 98841
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (3)
Votes (0)

 

CONORMCGREGOR123

Pro

As much as I hate to say it, Batman is a superhero. Merriam-Webster defines superhero as "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also : an exceptionally skillful or successful person." We know that Batman does not have superhuman powers however he is extremely skillful and successful.
McDavid

Con

This will be a fun debate! I accept your definition of a superhero.

The definition shows that the word, "superhero" has two usages. The first is , "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman power". The second is, "an exceptionally skillful or successful person." Your argument points to the second usage. You assert that since Batman is exceptionally skillful he is a superhero. But the second usage has two conditions which must be met to satisfy the definition of superhero, and Batman doesn't meet the second condition. Batman is not a person! Batman is a fictional character, and so the second usage can not apply to him. In the first usage, although he is a fictional hero, he does not have extraordinary or superhuman powers. Therefore Batman is not a superhero.
Debate Round No. 1
CONORMCGREGOR123

Pro

Since the second definition satisfies the word superhero and since Bruce Wayne is a person inside a fictional universe he is a superhero. The second definition does not define whether the person is fictional or not. Batman has mastered 127 martial arts and has a photographic memory not to mention he is a multi-millionaire. I would say he is very skillful and successful, wouldn't you?
McDavid

Con

I completely agree that Batman is very skillful and successful. The second definition does not specify that a person must be real, but it is implied by the use of fictional in the first definition. If a fictional person can be a superhero by being extraordinarily skillful and successful, then Felicity Smoak, the Arrow's extraordinarily skilled at computers helper who becomes CEO of a huge corporation, is a superhero. Even worse, Lex Luther must be a superhero. He is a person and he is very skillful at evil and successful at earning money. Felicity and Lex don't qualify as superheros under the second definition because they are not real people.

The second definition is what allows a great Mom to be a superhero. She doesn't fight evil, but she is a real person who is extraordinarily skillful and successful at raising her children. That's what makes her Super Mom, a real superhero.

Fictional people must be heroes with super powers to be superheros. Batman, although a true great hero, is not a superhero.
Debate Round No. 2
CONORMCGREGOR123

Pro

First off all, you cannot use Lex Luthor as an example of the word superhero because we all know he is a villain and since the second definition means an exceptionally skillful and successful person therefore he is a super villain. As for Felicity Smoak I would guess she is a superhero because of the use of the second definition. This topic is very controversial and debated. Most people would accept Batman as a superhero not because of the definitions but because who Batman as a person. His will and his doctrines set him apart from other superheros, he is simply different.
McDavid

Con

"Most people would accept Batman as a superhero not because of the definitions but because who Batman as a person."
This may be true, but you, myself, and our audience are not most people. We are extremely enlightened as members of Debate.org and know that, as others have said, "A lack of precision is dangerous when the margin of error is small."

Let's remember that the definition of a Superhero that we've agreed on is, "an exceptionally skillful or successful person." Lex Luthor is certainly an exceptionally skillful and successful fictional person. You've argued that Lex Luthor's status as a villain prevents him from being a Superhero, but the definition does not specify that an exceptional skillful or successful person must be a hero, or not a villain. People might believe that the requirement of being a hero is implied, but I will answer the requirement that the person be real in the second definition is also implied. I will concede that the implication of being good or not evil disqualifies Lex Luthor from being a Superhero, but reassert that the requirement that a person be real is also implied in the second definition.

Batman is a very great hero, but as a fictional character without super powers he does not meet the standard of a superhero under either definition agreed upon.

I thank my opponent for this debate, and urge you to vote for my position that Batman is not a superhero.
Debate Round No. 3
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by CONORMCGREGOR123 1 year ago
CONORMCGREGOR123
It was good debating with you too McDavid
Posted by McDavid 1 year ago
McDavid
Just wanted to say thanks for the debate CONNORMCGREGOR123. It was nice to talk about something light and fun, and I wish you the best!
Posted by Bhavyapratap 1 year ago
Bhavyapratap
Yes, I stand in favor of the motion that Batman is truly a Superhero. Where Marvel characters are all gifted with unique powers and special abilities, Bruce Wayne is depicted as a self-made man who though struggling with childhood traumas, reincarnates as a tough man who could easily challenge villains of any kind. Developing skills and mastering the art to beat the bad guys is what makes him more admirable. His vivid attitude of not binding by the law and undertaking things in his own way, makes him fearless and courageous.
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