The Instigator
daedae324
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
zmoney
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Is Ebonics a Real Language

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
daedae324
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/2/2011 Category: Education
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,549 times Debate No: 19625
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

daedae324

Pro

Ebonics is in fact a real language just like English, Spanish, Dutch, etc.
zmoney

Con

I am con, so i support the fact that ebonics is not a real language, rather an imbaresment to the african-american race to say that the mispronunciation of words among african-american citizens is so mis-understood that it becomes so foriegn to other American citizens that it has to become considered a complete different language.
Debate Round No. 1
daedae324

Pro

1st: Your comment of Ebonics being miss-understood by Americans is not really helping your case because the majority of Americans only speak English. With that being said, if an American cannot understand a foreign language such as Njerep, is it to say that it cannot be a real language just because Americans cannot understand it?

2nd: The definition for the word language, according to the dictionary, is: a body of words and the systems for their use common to a people who are of the same community or nation.
As you have just stated, and as everyone knows, Ebonics is most commonly used with African American/Black people. So in keeping with what the dictionary says, because Ebonics is most commonly used by the people of the African American/Black community, it is in fact a language.

daedae324
zmoney

Con

I fully acknowledge your definition of a language, and i reply with the dictionary.com definition of a dialect:

a variety of a language that is distinguished from other varieties of the same language by features of phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, and by its use by a group of speakers who are set off from others geographically or socially.

According to this definition, Ebonics can be considered a dialect of the English language. Ebonics, similar to English in the use of vocabulary and grammar, is as you stated mainly used by the "African-American/Black culture", and it is fair to say that this culture is separated socially from other cultures, and if we can take that social aspect one step further, Ebonics is spoken among the middle to lower class African-american/black community as common knowledge would show. thus proving two social factors that separate those who "speak" Ebonics, and those who speak English and fulfilling the definition of a dialect rather than a language

Also, Ebonics could not be a language because many linguistics know, a language is more political and cultural than just a group of words with grammar rules. For example you can take the Chinese and the Japanese. Though to an outside spectator that knows little of the two, the languages may sound, and actually be similar, but weather they are, or not is irrelevant. If you tell a Chinese person that he speaks Japanese he/she would most likely correct you because telling them that they speak Japanese can be considered an insult, culturally and politically that person is Chinese and not Japanese, thus it is reflected in there language.
Japan and China are politically, and literally separated, thus represented in there language. However those who 'speak' Ebonics, doubtfully, would like to be separated from their counter-parts who speak English. Yes there among those two groups (Ebonics 'speakers', and English speakers) but this separation is not political or cultural.
This separation can not be considered a cultural separation because I do not believe that all African-Americans/Blacks would like to be culturally linked to being able to 'speak Ebonics, however all Chinese (as those who are of direct Chinese decent and live in china) are culturally associated with the Chinese language.
Debate Round No. 2
daedae324

Pro

1st: you are neither a linguist nor are you Chinese so the fact that you are making personal experience type arguments and the fact that your arguments are based on opinion instead of facts makes your argument void.
2nd: It may be true that Ebonics borrows heavily from the English language, but doesn't English do the same thing? English after all is based on both Greek and Italian. But English isn't a dialect. It is a language. Just like English has its own rules and punctuation, Ebonics does too. That implies that Ebonics has the qualities of a language and therefore it is a language.

Daedae324
zmoney

Con

zmoney forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
daedae324

Pro

daedae324 forfeited this round.
zmoney

Con

zmoney forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by daedae324 5 years ago
daedae324
For those judging, I know Zmoney personally, just to clarify the 1st part of my argument in round 3.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by WriterSelbe 5 years ago
WriterSelbe
daedae324zmoneyTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro was last to post so pro wins.