The Instigator
IntellectualPerson
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Black_Cap
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Is black a color?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/19/2013 Category: Science
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 470 times Debate No: 42622
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

IntellectualPerson

Con

I will argue in favor of the resolution that black is indeed not a color.

How black is not a color

1) Let us use Newton's prism to break white light into various wavelengths of each color.



We can measure red, orange, green, etc. However, we can not measure black. Black can not become any more "black" (As we perceive colors). And if we illuminate an area of darkness, even in the very least, the area will no longer be black. It would be gray.

2) Let us use the electromagnetic spectrum.

File:EM Spectrum Properties edit.svg

It consists of every color. Colors reflect themselves, however absorbs every other color. However, black does not reflect any of those colors. It simply absorbs all of them.

Conclusion:

I have come to the conclusion that black is simply the absence of the presences of the visible spectrum colors.
Black_Cap

Pro

a.[uncountable] the quality of being red, blue, yellow etc, instead of being black and white or transparent
Pot plants add colour to a room.
in colour:
Are the pictures in colour or black and white?

b.[countable] something such as clothing or paint that is a particular colour
"I prefer wearing dark colours."
"Mix the colours with your paintbrush."
-http://www.macmillandictionary.com...

So since we're human and lazy bastards sometimes when it comes to naming things, in this case, colour has multiple meanings. Your explanation of the countable definition, or more in a scientific sense, the subtractive method of making colour, is completely accurate and true. However, since we're not only talking about that particular definition, I'm just going to show that it still qualifies as a colour because it's what we consider the additive definition of "colour" to mean black.

So if you still want to argue that black is never a colour, I think the only further course of debating would be to show that the other definition where it does constitute a colour is actually not true, somehow. Primarily since I agree with your initial argument on that interpretation of the word "colour"
Debate Round No. 1
IntellectualPerson

Con

Rebuttals:

"So since we're human and lazy bastards sometimes when it comes to naming things, in this case, colour has multiple meanings."

Yes, absolutely. In fact, thanks for pointing that out. I apologize for not typing in what definition of color we are going to use. So, I'll do so now:

Definition of color (n)
Bing Dictionary
  • col·or
  • [ kúllər ]
  1. property causing visual sensation: the property of objects that depends on the light that they reflect and is perceived as red, blue, green, or other shades
"So if you still want to argue that black is never a colour, I think the only further course of debating would be to show that the other definition where it does constitute a colour is actually not true, somehow. Primarily since I agree with your initial argument on that interpretation of the word "colour""

Yes. There are varieties of definitions of color. You have agreed with my initial argument primarily because of the definition you KNOW I was using to justify my claim that black is a color.

And if so, why did you accept the debate? Especially taking in to mind the fact that you are supposed to contest my contentions and the fact that you KNEW what definition I was using.
Black_Cap

Pro

As with any debate topic, there are multiple approaches one can take to persuade others. I read the title and disagreed on the basis that the statement was not entirely correct. Hence my acceptance and initial argument.

Since you clearly didn't state that your stance is solely based on the one definition, I don't see why I couldn't express the cases where it was not the case.

However, since I don't want to see this interesting debate topic go completely to waste, I'll agree to play the devil's advocate and argue against your definition of colour.

The basis of my argument will henceforth be based on the notion that classifying the lack of something can still qualify within the spectrum of the subject. The best analogy I can think of is the use of 0 in our number system. The value given to 0 is basically the lack of value. On that point, should 0 not be considered a number? If you agree that it should be a number, then I don't see why you can't extend the same courtesy to "black", which constitutes an equivalent "lack of value" on the colour spectrum.
Debate Round No. 2
IntellectualPerson

Con

IntellectualPerson forfeited this round.
Black_Cap

Pro

I'll forfeit the round too
Debate Round No. 3
IntellectualPerson

Con

IntellectualPerson forfeited this round.
Black_Cap

Pro

... and again
Debate Round No. 4
IntellectualPerson

Con

IntellectualPerson forfeited this round.
Black_Cap

Pro

.... and done
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by Black_Cap 2 years ago
Black_Cap
Sigh, should have rechecked additive and subtractive colouring since I swapped the two in my argument :/ Apologies.
Posted by Ikkemb 2 years ago
Ikkemb
I agree with IntellectualPerson, black is not a colour, it's merely the absence of colours, so everything but one. Simple physics.
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