The Instigator
SweetCrackerJack
Con (against)
Losing
1 Points
The Contender
Dismissah
Pro (for)
Winning
4 Points

Is black a color?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Dismissah
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/21/2013 Category: Science
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 538 times Debate No: 42762
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

SweetCrackerJack

Con

I will argue in favor of the resolution that black is indeed not a color.

However, in pigments, black is indeed a color. And in that case, white is not.

Evidence to back up my claim

Electromagnetic Spectrum of Light

The electromagnetic spectrum (Above) is the range of wavelengths and frequencies over electromagnetic radiation. The wavelength of one is the distance between two crests.

For instance, one with a wavelength between 492 to 577 nanometers is green. So, a plant's clorophyll molecules reflect that, while absorbing the rest.

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Why does it matter, you ask?

Sunlight (White) is composed of all colors. We are susceptible to heat. The Sun transmits some to the Earth. Rain droplets reflect different ones, emanating from the Sun (Like said). That is how Rainbows appear.

However, it does not consist of black. Let me further prove my point.



Let us use Newton's prism to break white light and study the various wavelengths of each color. Red, yellow, green, etc. is there. However, black is not.

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Conclusion

I have come to the conclusion that black is simply the absence of the presences of the electromagnetic spectrum colors, thus not making black one.

Also, I have noticed that 1 person with several alt. accounts has multiple debates about this. Please. I am not that person.
Dismissah

Pro

Colour/color as defined by the oxford dictionary is 'the property possessed by an object of producing different sensations on the eye as a result of the way it reflects or emits light'

The colour we see can be from a source or it can be a product of light being reflected of a material. As strange as it sounds, I think, the absorption of all light, does create a type of colour- black. I understand when people say that black is the absence of colour but on an abstract tangent can that not give rise to a new colour?

I'll reiterate that colour can be a product of light reflecting of a material. Black pigment gives rise to black not because it's black it's self but because of it's molecular structure that allows it to interact with light in a specific way... In the same way chlorophyll A absorbs all light except green thus giving the illusion that it's green. In clothes we wear, colour is created with chemicals.

Pink isn't in the light spectrum, is it a colour?
Debate Round No. 1
SweetCrackerJack

Con

Rebuttals

"Colour/color as defined by the oxford dictionary is 'the property possessed by an object of producing different sensations on the eye as a result of the way it reflects or emits light'"

Alright.

"The colour we see can be from a source or it can be a product of light being reflected of a material. As strange as it sounds, I think, the absorption of all light, does create a type of colour- black. I understand when people say that black is the absence of colour but on an abstract tangent can that not give rise to a new colour?"

However, according to YOUR definition, colored objects emit light. This is a self-contradiction.

"Black pigment gives rise to black not because it's black it's self but because of it's molecular structure that allows it to interact with light in a specific way... In the same way chlorophyll A absorbs all light except green thus giving the illusion that it's green. In clothes we wear, colour is created with chemicals."

Indeed. For pigments, black is a color. And in that case, white is not.

"Pink isn't in the light spectrum, is it a colour?"

Indeed. It is not a color. NOT because it does not emit light, but because it is the absence of the presences of the spectrum colors, thus not making pink one.

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I await Pro's next set of arguments.
Dismissah

Pro

No, I have not contradicted myself at all. Coloured objects are seen because they either emit light or it's because of the way they interact with light. That's what I'm saying here:

"Black pigment gives rise to black not because it's black it's self but because of it's molecular structure that allows it to interact with light in a specific way... In the same way chlorophyll A absorbs all light except green thus giving the illusion that it's green. In clothes we wear, colour is created with chemicals."

Can you kindly give your definition of 'colour'?

I do understand what you mean when you say; its absence from light spectrum disqualifies it as being a colour. I agree that because black and pink are not on the EM spectrum, they cannot be 'aren't'. But consider the mixing of blue and green; what would you call the product? What do you really see when you look at something that is pink and something that is black?
Debate Round No. 2
SweetCrackerJack

Con

Rebuttals

""Black pigment gives rise to black not because it's black it's self but because of it's molecular structure that allows it to interact with light in a specific way... In the same way chlorophyll A absorbs all light except green thus giving the illusion that it's green. In clothes we wear, colour is created with chemicals.""

No. They do not. For pigments, the electromagnetic spectrum does not apply. Mix the 3 primary colors together (Red, blue, and yellow). You won't get a jet black, but the point would be clear. The history of black pigments includes charcoal, iron metals, and other chemicals as the source of black paints.

"Can you kindly give your definition of 'colour'?"

I accept your definition of color.

"I do understand what you mean when you say; its absence from light spectrum disqualifies it as being a colour. I agree that because black and pink are not on the EM spectrum, they cannot be 'aren't'. But consider the mixing of blue and green; what would you call the product? What do you really see when you look at something that is pink and something that is black?"

Yes, indeed. According to your definition, colors must emit light. The electromagnetic spectrum does not consist of both colors because it does not do so. Like said, Sunlight (White, in particular) is composed of all colors. It transmits electromagnetic radiations with various wavelengths. The rain droplets reflect one, causing a Rainbow to appear. All the colors in the Rainbow are in the electromagnetic spectrum.

When I look at black and/or pink objects, I know that they only absorb, rather than reflect electromagnetic radiation, thus not making itself a color. However, like said, for pigments, they are indeed a color.
Dismissah

Pro

I meant '*colours' instead of 'aren't'. My apologies.

'No. They do not. For pigments, the electromagnetic spectrum does not apply. Mix the 3 primary colors together (Red, blue, and yellow). You won't get a jet black, but the point would be clear. The history of black pigments includes charcoal, iron metals, and other chemicals as the source of black paints.'

But surely the electromagnetic spectrum does matter? In the absence of light, what colour would those pigments be and what colour would anything be? Without light and its interaction (absorption/reflection) with different materials; there would be no such thing as colour, no? I know that if one was the mix the primary colours, they would obtain white.

Again, I'm NOT saying that colours 'must' emit light. We get different colours because of white light's interaction with different materials.

"When I look at black and/or pink objects, I know that they only absorb, rather than reflect electromagnetic radiation, thus not making itself a color. However, like said, for pigments, they are indeed a color."

I agree that black absorbs all light and that"s why we see it as black but I don"t think that"s how it works for pink.

You might have already seen this short video by minute physics:

I"ve only just noticed that they say "light" instead of "colour".

I could go on and ask if brown is a colour and your answer would probably be a no because it"s not on the EM spectrum?

I tried to put the point across earlier but I"ll reiterate it once again. It"s possible to get colours that aren't necessarily in the EM spectrum by mixing. Just like two humans mix to make another human, I"m sure the mixing of two colours will always result in a colour.

"
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Seek 2 years ago
Seek
So is it a colour or is it not a colour?
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by dtaylor971 2 years ago
dtaylor971
SweetCrackerJackDismissahTied
Agreed with before the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:14 
Reasons for voting decision: For conduct, con accused pro of self-contradiction, which was false. He loses a point for accusing wrongly. As for spelling and grammar, I thought that pro made a few mistakes here and there, while con was fluent and in the game. However, he was not fluent in his arguments. Pro successfully met the resolution that black was a color, while con said that pink is not a color because it does not show up on the light spectrum. That is his main weak point where he lost the debate. No one used sources, so no free easy two points for either side.