The Instigator
Physician
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
APhysicist
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Is black a measurable color?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/19/2013 Category: Science
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,257 times Debate No: 42650
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (4)
Votes (0)

 

Physician

Con

I will argue in favor of the resolution that black is indeed not a color and indeed immeasurable.

How black is immeasurable



Let us use Newton's prism (Above) to break white light and study the various wavelengths of each color. Red, orange, etc. we can measure. Black? No. Black can not become any more "black" (As we perceive colors). And if we were to illuminate a room of darkness, even in the very least, it will no longer be black. It would be grey.

How black is not a color



Objects (Except for black ones) reflect their own color, while absorbing the other colors. Black does not reflect any color. It simply absorbs them.

The electromagnetic spectrum (Above) is the range of wavelengths and frequencies of electromagnetic radiation (Which it itself is energy transmitted). The wavelengths are the distances between two crests (Mountains). And depending on that, a color is there.

For instance, an electromagnetic radiation between 492 nanometers to 577 nanometers is green. That is reflected by plants because of its clorophyll molecules. And it absorbs every other color.



APhysicist

Pro

Why does it need wavelengths to be a color? It doesnt matter black is a color.

Debate Round No. 1
Physician

Con

Rebuttals:

"Why does it need wavelengths to be a color? It doesnt matter black is a color."

For pigments, black is indeed a color. And in that case, white is not.

However, for this, it is not. Wavelengths, like said, are distances between two crests (Mountains) of an electromagnetic radiation. Depending on that, there is EVERY color.

So, that is energy transmitted.

For instance, A plant's clorophyll molecule reflects an electromagnetic radiation between 492 nanometers to 577 nanometers, however absorbs others, because that is green. Since, like said, black objects don't reflect any colors, therefore, it is the absence of the presences of the electromagnetic spectrum colors, therefore, it is not a color.
APhysicist

Pro

ok but pink is a color at least n*gga SUCK MY D*CK MOTHAFOCKA DIKNIGANIGANIGA
Debate Round No. 2
Physician

Con

Rebuttals:

"ok but pink is a color at least"

However, that is not what we are arguing for and against. We are doing so over if black is a measurable color.

Also, pink is not a color.

Obrázek
At the very left is ultraviolet (Non-perceivable color when wavelengths (Distance between two crests (Mountains)) are less distant). At the very right is infrared (Non-perceivable color too).

Every object (Other than pink and black ones) reflect a color, and absorbs others. How? Depending on the distance between two crests, there is a color. For instance, a plant's clorophyll molecule reflects a green electromagnetic radiation (Above on the spectrum).

The electromagnetic spectrum does not consist of pink. Therefore, pink is the absence of the presence of the visible/electromagnetic spectrum colors. Therefore, it itself is not a color.

APhysicist

Pro

APhysicist forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by CanWeKnow 3 years ago
CanWeKnow
Ooh good article. I would still contest however that when viewing things that are the color black that it is really a nice blend of very very dark grays. Color doesn't exist I guess. -_-
Posted by agrabou2 3 years ago
agrabou2
@CanWeKnow, you are making sense, but I have a refutation to that. Black actually is a void, in the same way that the color pink is a void.
Pink?
PINK?!
Yes, pink is not actually a color, according to scientists.
http://gizmodo.com...
It is rather, a machination of the brain to fill in missing light from an image.
In that same vein, when someone sees black, it is actually their brains way with coping with not having any information for that certain area.
:)
Posted by CanWeKnow 3 years ago
CanWeKnow
I don't think I am capable of arguing this debate in an official capacity, but I would contest that black is a kind of color (hehe kind of) and can be measured. Black, as you say, is simply the absence of reflected light. I think it would be safe to say that Black, as we see it, is not Black. After all, if it were truly Black, we wouldn't see anything. It would appear to be a void, like a black hole. We don't really "see" black holes, but we do see what goes on around them.

We don't shoot photons out of our eyes and can't see what's around the corner. In order for us to see anything that has a black color SOME light MUST be reflected off of the object. If any part of the spectrum is reflected back with an unequal intensity the object gets a color other than black.

What I am saying is, Black is a color. Black can be measured. Black is Light being equally reflected over the spectrum at it's lowest visible intensity. White is Light being equally reflected over the spectrum at it's highest visible intensity. Gray is Light being equally reflected over the spectrum at it's mediumest intensity. Visible Black is therefore a color, just like Visible White is a color.

Am I making any sense? I'm just throwing the idea out there. o_o
Posted by agrabou2 3 years ago
agrabou2
I think this is an unfair debate for whoever accepts the challenge, considering that it is a scientific fact that black is not a color, but an absolute absence of light. In that regard, the opposition to the creator of this debate would not have any chance of winning at all.
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