The Instigator
Then
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
kmcbrair
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Is success in life important?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/10/2013 Category: Society
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 4,565 times Debate No: 36559
Debate Rounds (3)
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Then

Pro

I feel that success in life is very important as we need a base to feel proud and happy of our achievements.
Success provides us with confidence in ourselves and makes us strive to achieve great things in life.
Thus, I feel that success in important in life.
kmcbrair

Con

How much is a soul worth? What is the value of a child? In current terms, "success" is defined solely by monetary value. Many are born "unsuccessful" and will remain "unsuccessful" for the duration of their lives. The "successful" can then bask in comfort and look down upon those who have not succeeded in crawling out of the gutter by labeling them lazy, stupid or incompetent. Can we only "succeed" when we look upon others who have "failed?" And do we ever "succeed" solely on our own? Do we recognize the persons or happenstance that have made our success possible? Or do we kid ourselves and say it's only through hard work and perseverance we made it? For bad or good, life works like the domino set-up; no event in our lives is isolated. How many people have mentored us, and how many have we stepped upon to "succeed?" Have we charged $10 for an item that would have still rendered a healthy profit at $7? Have we taken a 45-minute lunch break when we're only allowed 30 minutes? Have we not returned the phone call of a customer who has a legitimate beef? Are we working for companies that we know are delivering sub-par services or products? At whose cost have we gained our success? And if it's at someone else's cost, can it be labeled "success?"
Debate Round No. 1
Then

Pro

Success can come from both being successful and unsuccessful too.
For example, you can be successful and have many people look up to you. Would you not be happy?
If it is your goal to be happy, then you are successful.
Also, you can be successful even if others think of you as unsuccessful.
For example, a beggar on the street finds success and happiness in getting enough money to buy a meal.
He/she may not know it but they have actually been successful by accomplishing a task in their lives.
Some may argue that success is determined monetarily but, if you look at it closely, you will find that at the end of the day, its not the clothes that make the man,its the man who makes the clothes.
Thus, as you can see, success is very important as, no matter where you are, and what you do, you will always find success in one way or another.
kmcbrair

Con

kmcbrair forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Then

Pro

Success is a goal you want to achieve in life.
Take, for example, Bill Gates.He was a college dropout before starting to make computers and created microsoft.
He had a goal and worked to achieve it.When he achieved it, he had success.
As you can see, success is about doing something you love and doing it well.
With that, I rest my case.
kmcbrair

Con

With round two, I didn't lament the forfeiture as I agreed largely with what you said. Hard to argue that; however, in round three, citing Bill Gates as an example of success proved my point a bit and outed the "success doesn't equate to money" argument. Bill Gates is undoubtedly highly intelligent and successful, but I would be a lot more impressed with his success if more people could afford his products. I'm a little more impressed with the successes of Mother Theresa (how many lives has the Mission saved?) or Gandhi ("The British are Leaving!"). How about The Innocence Project, Doctors without Borders, the Red Cross, or all the other countless charities that have saved lives without the end result of mansions and Rolls-Royces for which far less well-off people have paid? Undoubtedly, there should be rewards for hard work and success, but when is enough enough? The altruistic people/organizations I used as an example have been hugely successful with far more wide-spread effects, and to the benefit of, not at the cost of, the struggling. How about Wal-Mart? Undoubtedly a successful corporation, it has caused countless business failures across America, and that is only the tip of the iceberg of the carnage. If success comes at the cost of others, doesn't that defy the true definition?
Debate Round No. 3
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