The Instigator
sunside
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
paintballvet18
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Is swimming harder than hockey?

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Post Voting Period
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/19/2017 Category: Sports
Updated: 10 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 505 times Debate No: 101149
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

sunside

Pro

Swimming is definitely harder than hockey. Imagine waking up at 5:00 every morning and going to practice, then coming home from school/work and practicing again for 2 hours. and then repeating that for the rest of the week. It requires much more endurance, and physical ability. I have friends that play hockey at A level or double A and they only practice around 3 hours a week, that might not be for everyone but A for swimming is much harder than that
paintballvet18

Con

I accept.

Hockey players can also practice for the amount of time you describe.

I would know because my brother does.

So your argument is not unique to swimming and is therefore disregarded in this debate.

Hockey is much harder because it is a physical wrestling match on ice. Not to mention the fact that hockey games are much longer and strenuous than swimming races.
Debate Round No. 1
sunside

Pro

unlike hockey, swimming trains year round. The off season is merely a two week break in August. Swimmers are also given a few holidays off including Christmas Day, Thanksgiving, Spring Break, and Labor Day. They can"t take off more time than that because, as swimmers, they have to remain in top shape otherwise the athletes lose strength and speed.

Every time a swimmer competes, he is not only gunning to win his race, he is also trying to improve on his best performance times. Even though swim meets often have team events, swimming is mostly an individual sport. The athlete cannot rely on a teammate to bolster his performance on an off day. A swimmer"s rank is based solely on the individual"s effort during his race, as well as his natural skill pitted against his fellow competitor.
paintballvet18

Con

I thank my opponent for his response.

However, he/she is yet to make an argument unique to swimming.

My brother works out physically year round at the same time table described for swimming, so so far, my opponent has not met his burden of proof.

Team sports are much harder than individual sports. The more pieces to a machine, the more complex it gets. This proves to show that hockey being a team sport is harder than swimming.

My opponent fails to refute my point on how hockey is a physical battle, therefore since he can't reply now, this has to be a voting issue in favor of the Con side of the debate.

Vote Con.
Debate Round No. 2
sunside

Pro

I disagree.
In team sports, you can rely on others to make that final winning shot. However, in swimming everything depends on you. You say swim races are short, but that only depends on the race you're swimming, 1500s would be much longer than 50s. In case you didn't know, several olympic swimmers have died before because of their swim practices. That sure hasn't happened for a hockey player. Although hockey may be more 'dangerous' in terms of getting hit by the puck, swimming is more hard on the body during practices.
paintballvet18

Con

My opponent again fails to fulfill his or her burden of proof, therefore you can negate off that. He still hasn't proved why the resolution, swimming is harder than hockey, has been fulfilled.

Therefor, Vote Con.

He restates an argument that is not unique to swimming in Round 3, and fails to refute my points in Round 2.

Therefore, Vote Con.

Your neck can be slashed with a skate. You can take a stick in the forehead and crack it. Hockey is much more dangerous than swimming.

Therefore, Vote Con,

I rest my case.
Debate Round No. 3
sunside

Pro

Hockey may seem more dangerous because it's injuries are visual, but swimming injuries can be much worse. Swimmers have actually died in practices and races, due to lack of oxygen and excess strain on the body. From my research in the worlds most dangerous sports, Swimming is in the top 10 and hockey didn't make the cut. However, this argument is not about which sport is more dangerous but which sport is harder on the body.

Swimmers may train more than five miles a day, putting joints through extreme repetitive motion which causes great strain on their body. The average swimmer by college graduation trains 10,840 hours to swim a race that can be decided by one one-hundredth of a second.

As strength: A swimmer of course uses strength, I shouldn't have to prove this to you

As Strength: the arms and hips are responsible for propelling the body through the water and both are directly connected to the lumbar spine. A strong core will enable more energy to be transferred from the core to the pull and kick components of the stroke. A weak core will allow more energy to leak out, resulting in a less powerful pull and kick. Thus saying a swimmer must also have strength.

As Agility: The stronger a swimmer is the more agility they have. Because swimming is built on as above "arms and hips", The more power and speed put into a stroke the more agile they become.

As for stamina, In all actuality swimming would take just as much stamina as hockey as they are both a complete work out of the body.

Swimming is just as much about technique as it is about strength. There's so much to the technique of a stroke that you have to think about while you're swimming, and every single event you do needs different strategies. This isn't something you'd have to think about for hockey.
paintballvet18

Con

Going line to line in my opponent's last round (it's funny how he waits for the last round to actually make some points)...

"Hockey may seem more dangerous because it's injuries are visual, but swimming injuries can be much worse. Swimmers have actually died in practices and races, due to lack of oxygen and excess strain on the body. From my research in the worlds most dangerous sports, Swimming is in the top 10 and hockey didn't make the cut. However, this argument is not about which sport is more dangerous but which sport is harder on the body."

Your research!?!?!? Can you show me where this is accepted in the academic community???? A source link maybe???

Judges let's be honest. This can be disregarded for lack of evidence.

"Swimmers may train more than five miles a day, putting joints through extreme repetitive motion which causes great strain on their body. The average swimmer by college graduation trains 10,840 hours to swim a race that can be decided by one one-hundredth of a second."

Same for hockey players. That amounts to 451 days, so yes, hockey players do just this. My opponent therefore gets no offense on this point because its nullified by both sides. He also has no sources to confirm that number of 10840...

"As strength: A swimmer of course uses strength, I shouldn't have to prove this to you"

Actually yes. With sources.

"As Strength: the arms and hips are responsible for propelling the body through the water and both are directly connected to the lumbar spine. A strong core will enable more energy to be transferred from the core to the pull and kick components of the stroke. A weak core will allow more energy to leak out, resulting in a less powerful pull and kick. Thus saying a swimmer must also have strength."

Sources!?!?! Again my opponent continues his speculatory rave with little to no actual fact. This argument can be disregarded.

"As Agility: The stronger a swimmer is the more agility they have. Because swimming is built on as above "arms and hips", The more power and speed put into a stroke the more agile they become."

Sane for hockey. Its all in the arms for shots and in the legs for moving on ice. No offense is gained from this argument because its nullified on both sides.

"As for stamina, In all actuality swimming would take just as much stamina as hockey as they are both a complete work out of the body."

He admits that swimming isn't harder. Therfore, he doesn't uphold the resolution. You can negate off that.

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All in all, my opponent doesn't prove his side of the debate, therefore you literally can't affirm. You have to vote Con because hockey is frankly just as if not harder than swimming.

Thank you.
Debate Round No. 4
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