The Instigator
Certified
Con (against)
The Contender
Krueger515
Pro (for)

Is the earth flat?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/19/2017 Category: Science
Updated: 11 months ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 424 times Debate No: 103602
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Certified

Con

Assume, for the sake of argument, that the earth is flat. Since, trivially, all planes have a center, a plane that strictly occupies two dimensions will have a center at, say, northen Africa, and places like the US and Australia will be closer to the edge. Since I know you live in America, I have one request for you: Jump. You fall straight down, right? Now go somewhere else, and jump again. Again, you fall straight down. No matter where you go, this will always be the same. But, if you are farther from the center of the earth, shouldn't you fall towards the center of gravity in North Africa? See? This doesn't make sense. Now consider if the earth is round, and every point on earth is equidistant from the center of gravity. Now, when you fall towards the center of gravity, you will always fall straight down. QED
Krueger515

Pro

I would like to thank Certified for creating this debate topic. I also want to state that while my arguments may be factually correct, I side with the Con stance in the real world. This is arguably an impossible debate stance to win with all facts known in this field, but the outcome of this debate should strictly be determined by the facts and arguments presented in this instance. However, my previous beliefs should not be a factor in determining my debate performance. I will try to make logical arguments that argue the pro stance.

The Earth is flat.

Let's take this step by step...

Excerpt 1: "Assume, for the sake of argument, that the earth is flat. Since, trivially, all planes have a center, a plane that strictly occupies two dimensions will have a center at, say, northen Africa, and places like the US and Australia will be closer to the edge."

There is nothing I challenge in this statement. This is an interesting starting point. However, it may be more realistic to depict the earth as a quasi-flat 3-dimensional surface to account for terrain changes on the Earth's surface.

Excerpt 2: "Since I know you live in America, I have one request for you: Jump. You fall straight down, right? Now go somewhere else, and jump again. Again, you fall straight down. No matter where you go, this will always be the same. But, if you are farther from the center of the earth, shouldn't you fall towards the center of gravity in North Africa? See? This doesn't make sense."

Let's take a look at this statement, especially the underlined section. The scenario in which Con bases his argument is flawed. In the first part of his scenario, he stated that we were assuming the Earth is a 2-dimensional plane centered in Northern Africa. 2-dimensional planes by definition have a volume of 0. If we look at the relationship of mass = density * volume, we can see that with a volume of 0, the mass of the earth must also be 0. Therefore the Earth would have no "gravitational" pull.

Excerpt 3: "Now consider if the earth is round, and every point on earth is equidistant from the center of gravity. Now, when you fall towards the center of gravity, you will always fall straight down. "

This would be a valid argument for the Con stance. However, there is another explanation. Gravity by definition is an acceleration of approximately 9.81 m/s/s. I argue that it would be possible to achieve this same acceleration without "gravity". Perhaps the Earth is continuously being accelerated in a direction perpendicular to the 2-dimensional Earth plane at 9.81 m/s/s by an unknown force. It is entirely likely that the experiences of both scenarios would have identical effects on objects and living organisms living on Earth. This explanation also debunks excerpt number 2, offering a possible explanation for why jumping anywhere in the world results in falling straight down.

The reason this "Mysterious" force accelerating the Earth could still be unknown in this day in age can arguably be linked to the totality of science acting on the predicate that the Earth is spherical in shape and little to no resources being allocated to this angle of the debate.

To further continue my stance, the idea of "gravitational" pull also needs to be challenged. Gravity is a man-made concept used to describe the events that we experience in reality. There are also other possible explanations. Take, for example, the Strong Force. This mysterious force binds quarks together to form more-familiar subatomic particles, and also holds the nucleus of atoms together. A separate mysterious force related to the Strong Force could exist that explains the attraction between two items with mass. But, instead of mass being the deciding factor, it would be the number and make-up of individual atoms between 2 objects that create an attractive force. Perhaps there is an electromagnetic explanation. While this would be an interesting area of study, all gravitational effects can be recreated with other forms of acceleration, as described in my previous statements. We have no way of proving that gravity actually exists in reality. It is a theory that is used to justify the events that we observe in the real world.

Thanks again. This is fun.

Explanation of the Strong Force: https://www.britannica.com...
Explanation of Fundamental Interactions: https://www.britannica.com...
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