The Instigator
shay.walsh
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
panicinthetarids
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Is the nuclear family the most important family structure in society??

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/15/2013 Category: Society
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,545 times Debate No: 40603
Debate Rounds (3)
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Votes (0)

 

shay.walsh

Con

I think that this family type is not the most important family structure in society. I think other family structures are just as important as the nuclear.
My oppponent can take the first round....
panicinthetarids

Pro

I have decided to accept your argument.
I must say I agree with your statement that other family structures are just as important as the nuclear family, but I do believe that the nuclear family does lay as almost a blueprint for a family. Stereotypically when you think of a family you almost immediately think of a man, a woman and children (whether they are married or not). I do know that a nuclear family does in fact revolve around marriage typically which does appear to lay out a stability in a family so to re-iterate when you think of a family (as you have been taught from a young age that a family) is a husband, a wife and children. I fully believe other families are just as important in society (in comparison to the nuclear family) but I do believe that the nuclear family lays the foundations of what a family is to society. Mainly because from a young age we are taught what a family traditionally is, despite the changes in the past fifty years (especially) with more equality showing and acceptance to other types of families.
Debate Round No. 1
shay.walsh

Con

Already in your first argument, you have actually agreed with me by saying that other family structures within society are as important. Family structures such as same sex families still portray traditional beliefs of a main breadwinner and child carer, and so despite you accept that the nuclear family lay the foundations within society, these functions are still portrayed amongst other family structures.
Equally, traditional nuclear families are not always brought up around children, in fact primary socialisation plays a key part. If an adopted child (for example) is brought up around a same sex family, they are not brought up around a family where a husband and wife relationship is the norm. They are brought up around a family that are accepting of two males or two females being together, and so not all chidlren are brought up with these stereotypes.
Ethnic minorities are also often brought up in close knit communities and brought up in extended families, and so again these may have numerous incomes, and not just one breadwinner. As the UK has more minorities, more and more children are being brought up in non-tradition nuclear families.
My point therefore states that children are not brought up around this family, and more and more children are brought up around new family structures, not just the nuclear family, potentially due to secularisation. This also therefore means the nuclear family is not important in society, as society is constantly changing.
panicinthetarids

Pro

I did not say that children are all being brought up in a nuclear family, I am saying that when it has come to secondary socialisation (such as school) they have been taught that the nuclear family is the norm. They are taught this through nursery books, because there are next to no books on other family types anymore, it is typically a book on the nuclear family. This is what I meant when I said that 'from a young age we are taught what a family traditionally is' not necessarily through their own family, but through what they are physically taught in school.
When you mentioned about adoption you also seem to forget that the deffinition of family from 1943 also stated that the children in a family can be adopted. You had restricted the options because you appear to believe that a nuclear family does not include adoption at all.
I also have taken into consider secularisation as I did mention very briefly that the nuclear family does revolve around marriage and so as key to society and families you originally believe that a family is a 'husband, a wife, and children' but over the past fifty years divorce rates have increased substantially 27,000 in 1961 to 153,000 by 2006. this has changed the view on a family now because a lot of children are brought up in a cohabited family -where a man and a woman live together and have a family but are not married. Cohabitation is widely popular in modern day society because people do not see marriage as such a sacred act anymore due to the fact religion is on a decrease, especially in the UK where Christianity has decreased which back in the 1950's was the main religion in the UK. Gibson argues that secularization has resulted in marriage becoming less sacred and less of a spiritual union and more of a practical commitment which can easily be abandoned. Research shows that 65 per cent of marriages no longer involve a religious ceremony, so many people do not attach much religious significance to their marriages.
So despite the fact that the nuclear family may not be held together through marriage today it is still extremely common today through cohabitation. The nuclear family continues to lay a base for the family even with the wider range of families in today's society. With society changing a lot especially over the past fifty years it does not defeat the fact that the nuclear family is perhaps the most important family structure as other structures seem to revolve around what the nuclear family appears to be.
Debate Round No. 2
shay.walsh

Con

shay.walsh forfeited this round.
panicinthetarids

Pro

panicinthetarids forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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