The Instigator
oreogeneticist406
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Darkdrow
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

It is a student's right to skip school and/or choose their lessons

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/30/2015 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 468 times Debate No: 72597
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (6)
Votes (0)

 

oreogeneticist406

Pro

It is a student's 'right' to an education, which suggestes it's within their options if they so choose. But if it's a right, like the fifth amendment, it means it is something you are permitted to do, if you would like to, and not an obligation. It's a right, so why can't students ignore that right? Not everyone is talented and wants to learn, so why force them? Not to mention that children have a way of being cruel to one another in their schooling periods, and if a child decides they have had enough of the bullying or they want to be, say, a farmer, who are we to keep them in an institute of torture? Some may argue that school is there to help, not hurt, but I think not.
Somehow, over many years, school has turned from an option for those interested in learning, and more as a chore for the kids and adults. The children don't want to go, and the parents don't want to pay, yet both are doing so because of a 'right'.
School has found a way to take dreams and interests and turn them into paperwork and loss of childhood, which is already short. I believe that if a person or parent chooses that they or their child doesn't need the stress of schooling anymore, they should have the 'right' to take them out of the school. Of course, we don't want future generations becoming imbecils because their anscestors were lazy, but if students want to, they ought to be allowed to leave school after the sixth grade. After all, when has anyone used 'Pi' or 'x-y' in real life problems anyways? Besides Sheldon Cooper?
And if we don't let children leave school early on, then why can't they at least drop classes that will not help them in their future jobs or career choices? They do it in coledge; why not high school? If you plan on being a writer, why study Science? If you plan on being a Vet, why worry about Literature? If you plan on being a historian, what's the point in running laps around a field and practicing streches?
These meaningless lessons are filling up students' memory until they no longer have space for what they will need to know later in life. If you are skilled in music, you should be able to practice and increase your skill and not spend time cramming your mind with other irrelevent pieces of information. If you're interested in Biology and that's what you want to learn about, you should be able to focus on that, and not the periodic table.
It may also be true that phases occur where we feel most attracted to certain things, and later on we change our minds, and in these cases, where it turns out you were interested in Biology but are now interested in Biomes, then you should be able to choose Biomes for your next semester or school year. It is boring and puts young minds to sleep when they are forced to review the same topic they don't particulary care about for a full term in each class. It's bad enough that at a certain point in school, recess ceases to exist, as do field trips-- but then add bullying and lack of interest in the topic because it is portrayed so dully....that's the perfect combination for failing grades, depression and in worst cases suicide.
It seems drastic, but all these problems, not to mention family situation and social lives and hormones/growth and personal problems and worrying about future jobs/career choices and society expectations--it's enough to drive anyone crazy. There are many reports of students commiting suicide from all the pressure.
Pressure from a 'right'. Not a law, but a right.
Darkdrow

Con

The only problem with letting minors decide if they attend school or not is the fact that most will not. We would be a nation of ignorant, professional x-box gamers. That is the exact reason those kind of decisions are left to the parents that can opt for home school rather than public school if they choose but a state approved lesson plan is still required. When kids are growing up, what they want changes rather quickly. That is why the parents are responsible for making those decisions. You do have rights but things like school and healthcare are required to be enforced by your parents with the hope that once you turn 18, you have the education and maturity to make decisions on your own. If you choose to further your education there is college. If not their is Mc Donald's. There aren't many jobs that will take someone without at least a diploma and many need a degree also. There are exceptions but they are few and far between.

You also asked why take course's that have nothing to do with what you want to be? Every degree requires classes that have nothing to do with your chosen field and a big reason for that is because employers want to see that you are willing to work for something to reach a goal even if it has nothing to do with that goal. They know PE has nothing to do with being a computer programmer but if that's what you want to be then they want to see the willingness to work for it. It shows character and determination. They don't want to see that you will work hard to create whatever it is your job has you create and then walk away as soon as something pops up that doesn't interest you. If you are the best programmer but quit each time you have to walk across the building to print something then you aren't really worth much.

By the time you are 18 they hope you have gained the knowledge and maturity to make good decisions. Until that point it needs to made for you. How many 10 year olds would really choose school over video games?
Debate Round No. 1
oreogeneticist406

Pro

oreogeneticist406 forfeited this round.
Darkdrow

Con

Thank you
Debate Round No. 2
oreogeneticist406

Pro

oreogeneticist406 forfeited this round.
Darkdrow

Con

Darkdrow forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
6 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Posted by Darkdrow 1 year ago
Darkdrow
Thanks Oreo. I asked the same questions when I was growing up and that's how my parents explained it. Now that I have kids in high school they ask me and I give them the same answer. When you go through life sometimes the road sucks. Just gotta remember that life's not about the road you choose. It's about the destination that road takes you to.
Posted by oreogeneticist406 1 year ago
oreogeneticist406
I think Darkdrow won this debate, because I'd never thought about how other classes were testing students' determination to succeed and push forward. I never considered that angle and I see no legitamite reason to fight him/her again since they just convinced me. Really, that argument made sense and I didn't see it coming.
Posted by oreogeneticist406 1 year ago
oreogeneticist406
This Debate relates to high school, not middle or elementary school. It agree with Darkdrow in saying children will not pick school over video games, but older children would understand the consequences enough to make the right decision for their situation. Also, I was refering to the USA when I called education a right. About the paragraphs, sorry, I was really into what I was writing and probably made a few spelling errors as well.
Posted by Episteme 1 year ago
Episteme
One of the commenters had a legitimate question regarding whether this question has to do with middle school or high school. I would like to know as well.

Further, depending on where you are, it is not legal for a person under a certain age to not have completed a certain level of education. Please note this depends on where you are. I believe in the UK, you are legally obligated to go to school until the age of 16. If you are not in school, your parents could be fined. So, in this sense, it isn't a right to go to school, it's a legal requirement until the age of 16.

Should it be a right before the age of 16? I personally do not think so because without a good general education it would be impossible to live an everyday life in which provides the best interaction with others. Jobs would be difficult to do and find without a good general education. (My point here, is that it would be beneficial to differentiate from the normative (should we) and the descriptive (do we.) Legal points are descriptive, typically, and questions of why and should we are typically normative.

The secondary question is should a student choose their lessons. Again, this requires an age descriptor and at what point in education this is. Is this high school, middle school or college? The US is somewhat different from the UK, in that there are requirements in college to do other subjects either as prerequisite courses that are required to get a major or other prerequisites not really needed for the major itself. In the UK, your 'prerequisites' as it were, come from what you do in high school (6th form and GCSE). It would be more difficult to apply to do a Bachelor's in philosophy without having done philosophy in high school. To continue the example in the UK, if you do philosophy, you do philosophy. Depending on the uni, there are no maths or science requirements for those subjects that don't use it.

Anyway, please specify and continue the debate! Thanks!
Posted by Ragnar 1 year ago
Ragnar
Please break apart your paragraphs.
Posted by kman100 1 year ago
kman100
Are we debating about middle school or high school?
No votes have been placed for this debate.