The Instigator
TheChristian
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
BoggyB
Con (against)
Winning
6 Points

John Hanson was the real first president

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
BoggyB
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/15/2014 Category: Politics
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 860 times Debate No: 67085
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (5)
Votes (1)

 

TheChristian

Pro

First round is only acceptance
BoggyB

Con

Greetings. Although you didn't specify, It is clear you are referring to the first president of the United States of America.
Debate Round No. 1
TheChristian

Pro

First off, thanks for knowing about the USA. I advise you to quit now if you dont know anything about the articles of confederationm but here goes- John Adams, in short, i will elaberate in later rounds, won over all tge states to ratify the articles, so the Congress Assembled voted him unanimously as president under tge articles of confederation. I will elaborate in rund 3.
BoggyB

Con

In 1777 the Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union, written by John Dickinson, was sent to the 13 states for ratification. In 1781, the thirteenth and final state ratified these articles thus it was only then it became official and put in place. This changed the continental congress to the congress of the confederation, which existed from 1781 to 1789. This new congress was unicameral, which meant it only had one house. The congress had a chief executive, essentially a "president." This was chosen by the legislature. Each state legislature could send 2 to 7 representatives to attend congress, but where allowed only one vote per state legislature, regardless of the number of representatives sent. The first person elected by legislature to be the chief was John Hanson. John Hanson was the first President of the Congress under Articles of Confederation. George Washington was the first President of the United Stares under the United States Constitution. John Hanson didn't not have have much power, despite there being only one house to the congress. There were two secretaries and one superintendent that handled most of administration. Secretaries of war & foreign affairs, and superintendent of finance. The Articles and Confederation were weak, and led to many problems. The country was always broke and in debt, and it didn't help each state was printing its own currency. During its eight year stand, and eight different chiefs of office, the confederate congress made little progress and ultimately fell apart. Although it was a base, it was a weak one at that. In 1787, a convention of delegates agreed to meet and vote a president of their convention, George Washington was voted unanimously by twelve representatives (as Rhode Island refused to attend). They then agreed upon why they were meeting. Where they meeting to decide to let the weak confederate congress die out and then begin a new? No. They agreed a national government needed to be established with three branches: Executive, Judiciary, and Legislative. Many settlements had to be made between delegates over the topics of Slavery, Representation, and Trade. The Great Compromise and the Three-Fifths compromise settle two of the three subjects, there was no compromise for trade. Once these topics were partially adressed, the framers, or founding fathers, (members of the convention) began the writing of the Constitution of the United States of America. These completely revised version of the articles is still the version we base our country upon to this day. In that constitution, they established the three branches of government and decided the Executive would hold the president and his three cabinets. The president and congress would be be elected by the people through the Electoral College, as Popular Sovereignty was stressed greatly by our founding fathers. Once the final draft was approved by the Convention, it was sent to the Confederate Congress. After it passed through the confederation it was sent to each individual state. In 1787, Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution. By 1789, all thirteen states had ratified the Constitution, and it was now the official basis of government for the U.S. This new three branches government replaced the weak congress before it. The first elections for the new congress was set for March 1789. February of 1789 George Washington was elected Chief Executive of the three branches of Government, AKA: The first President of the United States under the U.S. Constitution. Without the convention and the founding fathers, the confederate congress would have dissolved and dissipated. The new constitution and government was established and is still intact to this day.
Debate Round No. 2
TheChristian

Pro

Ok, while ou gave information on the President as we know it, ad the office was called Pres of the USA, he was president. Now here is the promised elaberation-Hanson served in the Mariland-the last state to ratify the flawed articles-since 1759,and was among the earliest proponents of the new nation, and was recognizedas a leaders by his peers.Hanson, as a proponent who helped write these articles, and persuaded-heres where Maryland comes in- Maryland, the last state needed to pass and make effective the articles of confederation, the constitution of the time- to sign the articles. In gratitude, the Congress Assembled UNANIMOUSLY elected him the President of the USA,and as he was the first to hold this office, was THE first President of the USA. He also did many things during his term, such as establish thanksgiving and other achievements kept during Washingtons presidentcy.And there were seven successors to Hanson before Washington- Armchair ReadersThe Amazing Book of History, page 297-299.
BoggyB

Con

Your claim is that John Hanson helped author the Articles of Confederation, and then persuaded Maryland to ratify them, which would thus put those Articles into place. The Articles of Confederation were in fact written by John Dickinson, and slightly revised by the 13 members the continental congress. John Hanson was involved, but did not have anymore influence than the other 13 delegates. Despite him being the delegate for Maryland, there is no evidence or proof that he necessarily persuaded them. He may have discussed it, but it is not sure he was actually the reason it was ratified. John Hanson was voted by legislation, not the people of the United States, as President of the Confederate Congress. He was president of congress as their was no executive branch and had little power. He didn't have half the power The President of the United States had once the executive branch was created. Hanson was under complete control of the congress and had 2 secretaries and a superintendent who dealt with the majority of documents for his one year in that position. Under this term you claim he established Thanksgiving and other "accomplishments" which were upheld into Washington's term. Thanksgiving was recognized several times a year during the American Revolution by the Continental Congress (not yet the confederate congress). In 1789, Washington's first year as president, Washington proclaimed a Thanksgiving to be held that year. This was the first year it was a official, federal holiday. It wasn't until Abraham Lincoln's presidency that it was declared a annual federal holiday. Either way, this holiday had little effect, if any at all, on the formation of the United States. I have never read John Hanson's associated with thanksgiving. You have not stated what else he actually did to further the country in his term as president of the congress, which wasn't the President of the United States. (United States History, 2012 BJU Press, Greenville, SC. Authors: Timothy Keesee, EdD, Mark Sidewell, PhD.) Also, (http://www.history.com...).
Debate Round No. 3
TheChristian

Pro

Ok, if Maryland had ratified it of their own initiative, it still cannot downsize his accomplishment, nor can the author not being him, and as the office was called President, he was president, and fyi, i have the argument you can use, you have not said it. When you do, you will win.
BoggyB

Con

Considering you haven't brought forth anymore arguments, and have not rebutted mine, I shall bring forth a new point, which may be this argument you speak of. I have done more research into the subject, and have discovered John Hanson was not even the first president of the Confederate Congress under the Articles of Confederate and Perpetual Union. Samuel Huntington was in face the first president of Confederate Congress. Huntington was the president of the Contintental Congress, which preceded the Articles, but once the articles were ratified, he was still the president of that congress. There was even a second president of the congress before Hanson claimed the title. Thomas Mckean in July of 1781 took office and lasted until November of the same year before Hanson was elected by legislature. Consideringthese are true, this will invalidate your claim as Hanson as the first president of Confederate Congress. I do not concede that Huntington is the first president of the U.S., I merely state that him being the first confederate congress president invalidates your arguments.
Debate Round No. 4
TheChristian

Pro

Well that was before the country was even independent, and that was NOT the argument, but it could be one, Huntington did no real work, and so was not president, just filled a seat, and you were close to refuting my argument, and at the time there was no constitution, so no President, he was like a chairman or speaker of the house. Good luck with the final round and the voting. Thanks for the debate.
BoggyB

Con

The country was independent in fact, but had yet to establish a sound government. Samuel Hunginton was the president of the Continental Congress, but that was the Congress that was under no constitution. In 1781 when the Articles of Confederation were ratified, the Contintental Congress became the Confederate Congress. Samuel Huntington still held the chief spot of the Confederate Congress, just because he didn't do anything noteworthy didn't mean he still wasn't occupying that seat. Shortly after the Articles were ratified, Thomas Mckean took Huntingtons spot as the second president of the Confederate Congress. John Hanson took the spot of third president of Cofederate Congress. You claim that because Huntington was not the president because he did nothing. Hanson did not accomplished anything noteworthy while holding this insignificant seat either. To review, Samual Huntington was the first president of the Confederate Congress, thus invalidating Pro's claim of Hanson first. I do not concede that Huntington was the first president of the United States, as my argument is still for George Washington. Just to cite my courses for the round 4: the same book that I had cited before, and (https://historymyths.wordpress.com...).
The same citing for this last round also.
Debate Round No. 5
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Shrek_sDrecKid 2 years ago
Shrek_sDrecKid
Your gay - must be why your percentile is so low...
Posted by TheChristian 2 years ago
TheChristian
Sorry, learning about Adams in history, my mistake
Posted by That1User 2 years ago
That1User
The first real president of what? The United States? Harvard Univeristy? The resolution is unclear.
Posted by TheChristian 2 years ago
TheChristian
Then accept and lose, mister cocky
Posted by Benjamin_Manus 2 years ago
Benjamin_Manus
Your resolution is 100% false...
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Blade-of-Truth 2 years ago
Blade-of-Truth
TheChristianBoggyBTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:-Vote Checkmark-2 points
Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct - Tie. Both had proper conduct throughout the debate. S&G - Con. Pro had several spelling errors in nearly every round. Con had nowhere near the same amount of errors. I would highly recommend Pro utilize the "check your spelling" option located at the bottom of the page right next to the "post argument" button. Arguments - Con. Pro argued that John Hanson was the first real president. Con then clarified president to mean president of the U.S. This is key because Con then showed that John Hanson was not the first president of the U.S. but rather a president of the congress before the executive branch was put into practice. He further challenged Pro's position by showing that Hanson wasn't even the first president of the congress. Pro's arguments were entirely defeated with this evidence from Con, and thus Con wins arguments. Sources - Con. While both utilized sources, Con's were greater in quantity. For this Con wins sources. This is a clear win for Con.