The Instigator
jh1234l
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
thepieman
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Laptops are Better Than Desktop Computers

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Post Voting Period
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after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/27/2012 Category: Technology
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 9,120 times Debate No: 25880
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (11)
Votes (0)

 

jh1234l

Pro

This is my first debate, so I won't be really good at it.
Here are some definitions:
Desktop computer-Computers that usually have: A monitor, a mouse, a keyboard and the actual computer.
Laptop: same as a desktop computer, though usually smaller can be taken from place to place. Usually has batteries.

Here is my first argument: Laptops have rechargeable batteries, so they can be used somewhere an electrical socket is not provided.
Second argument: Laptops can be taken from place to place, while desktop computers are harder to move.
thepieman

Con

Hello! This is also my first debate, so I guess we will see how it goes.
To your argument (they seem to be about the same thing), I will say that in the age of smartphones becoming practical, laptops are no longer needed. I can do almost anything from my smartphone that you can do from a laptop, but smartphones win with portability, as they fit in my pocket. So laptops (including Netbooks) are the third best type of computer because they are massive compare to smartphones and just as powerful.
1. Laptops are also not nearly as powerful as desktops (unless you want to shell out a thousand extra dollars). Desktops are great for large computations, like gaming and multitasking, with out ever running the risk of over heating or being dropped. Smart-shoppers can build an amazing rig for under $1,000. Given that does not include a monitor, keyboard or mouse, so more like $1,200 if you need those things.
2. Laptops have a much shorter life. Their batteries die, hard drives fail, the over heat, and run the real risk of being dropped and smashed. If any part of a desktop breaks (which is still less likely than the same part in a laptop failing), it can easily be replaced.
3.Desktops are more customizable. Buying computer parts for desktops is easy. They have do not have special sizes or parts. If I buy a new part for a desktop, it should fit into any other desktop. Buying parts of laptops is very difficult because of the variety and compactness.
4. Desktops are cheaper ($500 will get you a better desktop than laptop, as will $1500). Even after buying a monitor. They are also cheaper in the long term because they will need to be replace less often as I stated in point 2.
5. Desktops can (you don't even have to buy speakers) have better audio than laptop. I just hate listening to a good song with crappy (often mono) speakers
Debate Round No. 1
jh1234l

Pro

Here are your arguments (and my responses) :
1. Laptops are also not nearly as powerful as desktops (unless you want to shell out a thousand extra dollars). Desktops are great for large computations, like gaming and multitasking, with out ever running the risk of over heating or being dropped. Smart-shoppers can build an amazing rig for under $1,000. Given that does not include a monitor, keyboard or mouse, so more like $1,200 if you need those things.
Mine: First, some type of input device is needed for a computer to use it (eg. keyboard/mouse) so lets assume a desktop is bought for $1200 (as told in your claim). However, gaming laptops start from 649.00, and include keyboard and mouse. (1)
2. Laptops have a much shorter life. Their batteries die, hard drives fail, the over heat, and run the real risk of being dropped and smashed. If any part of a desktop breaks (which is still less likely than the same part in a laptop failing), it can easily be replaced.
Mine: Batteries can also be purchased directly, and are as easily replaceable as desktop pieces. Plus, you can also put the laptop on AC power. Hard drives can fail on laptops, and the risk of getting computer viruses are equal. Laptops overheat only if the fan is not working or the computer is put on a soft surface and sinks into it. Laptops can get dropped, though it will not always get damaged. Desktops, on the other hand, are heavier and will probably fall apart when dropped.
3.Desktops are more customizable. Buying computer parts for desktops is easy. They have do not have special sizes or parts. If I buy a new part for a desktop, it should fit into any other desktop. Buying parts of laptops is very difficult because of the variety and compactness.
Mine:There are many computer parts that work for laptops. For example, there are ones based on U.S.B.
4. Desktops are cheaper ($500 will get you a better desktop than laptop, as will $1500). Even after buying a monitor. They are also cheaper in the long term because they will need to be replace less often as I stated in point 2.
Mine: I stated the response to this below 1.
5. Desktops can (you don't even have to buy speakers) have better audio than laptop. I just hate listening to a good song with crappy (often mono) speakers
Mine: After you put speakers on a laptop, (about 10$), and add that to 649$, you get 659$, which is lower than the 1100$ you stated for desktops.
(1)http://shop.lenovo.com...
thepieman

Con

1. Your "Gaming" laptop can hardly game anything: http://www.theverge.com... While playing any modern game, on medium or low settings, the Nvidia 640M LE (Which is two big step down from the normal 640) can hardly keep the frame rate at a playable pace. For just $617, you can get this great rig from bestbuy: http://goo.gl... It comes with a mouse and keyboard, and if you don't want to by a monitor, gaming on family TV is the way to go! It can play any modern game on higher settings too. (I will say that the graphics card will be out-dated soon, but upgrading graphics cards are easy with desktops)
2. Buying batteries can still be a choir, and unnecessary if one only bought a desktop. Hard drive fail a lot more often in laptops than desktops, mainly because drives are one of the few moving parts of a computer. Most are spinning at 1200RPS, and just accelerating it to quickly could harm the drive. Most desktops have strong aluminum casing, so if I drop my desktop (which won't happen because it never needs to be moved) I would be more concerned about my toes than a dent in the case.
3. I was talking about internal hard ware; USBs are external, so desktops and laptops are kind-of tied there (with the exception that you must continuously plug, and unplug devices with laptops).
4. I was referring to bang per buck. Even after the purchase of a monitor desktops win (which you might only have to do once, I am on my third desktop and I still on my original dual monitors). And computer monitors are better than laptop monitors (brighter, bigger, and sharper).
5. Desktops have the capability of producing 7.1 surround sound. All it needs is a $50 sound card and some speakers. I know those speakers are very expensive, but I am trying to say that desktops have the option of that, while laptops do not.

I also found this article on how to build an amazing rig for under $1000: http://www.pcworld.com... It was made a year ago, so you could make the same rig for about $850 or upgrade the graphics card.
Debate Round No. 2
jh1234l

Pro

PS. I am using one of your links for rebutting (http://www.theverge.com...)
1. Your "Gaming" laptop can hardly game anything: http://www.theverge.com...... While playing any modern game, on medium or low settings, the Nvidia 640M LE (Which is two big step down from the normal 640) can hardly keep the frame rate at a playable pace. For just $617, you can get this great rig from bestbuy: http://goo.gl...... It comes with a mouse and keyboard, and if you don't want to by a monitor, gaming on family TV is the way to go! It can play any modern game on higher settings too. (I will say that the graphics card will be out-dated soon, but upgrading graphics cards are easy with desktops)

"can hardly keep the fps at a playable pace" Here is a quote from theverge: "In Battlefield 3 on MEDIUM settings at the Y480's native 1366 x 768 resolution, the game's frame-per-second rate hovered around the HIGH 30s, dipping as low as the HIGH 20s during some of the more frenetic firefights. Toning some of the quality settings down a bit further will get you a perpetually smooth experience, which would of course be ideal for a first person shooter. Alas, getting The Witcher 2 to a smooth 30 frames per second meant turning all of the various settings down to their lowest levels, and then dialing the resolution down to 1024 x 768. SMOOTH, but not an especially grandiose experience. Just Cause 2 didn't fare much better: 32 frames per second at a resolution of 1024 x 768, and down to an average of about 27 frames per second when the game runs at the machine's native 1366 x 768 resolution. " Note how I put some on uppercase. Battlefield did not run at a unplayable pace on medium. high 20s to high 30s is not unplayable, but rather smooth. 20-30 fps is usually the fps of films.

2. Buying batteries can still be a choir, and unnecessary if one only bought a desktop. Hard drive fail a lot more often in laptops than desktops, mainly because drives are one of the few moving parts of a computer. Most are spinning at 1200RPS, and just accelerating it to quickly could harm the drive. Most desktops have strong aluminum casing, so if I drop my desktop (which won't happen because it never needs to be moved) I would be more concerned about my toes than a dent in the case.

Well, the only time you will need to move a desktop is when you move. So the falling one is a tie laptops=high risk, less damage, desktops=low risk, not much damage to itself, but much damage to the floor and perhaps your toes.
Batteries: buying batteries is unnecessary for desktops, but buying mouse, keyboard and a monitor is unnecessary for laptops. (unless water got into the original keyboard/mouse)

3. I was talking about internal hard ware; USBs are external, so desktops and laptops are kind-of tied there (with the exception that you must continuously plug, and unplug devices with laptops).

But the ability to plug and unplug makes it easier to transfer the hardware to another computer.

4. I was referring to bang per buck. Even after the purchase of a monitor desktops win (which you might only have to do once, I am on my third desktop and I still on my original dual monitors). And computer monitors are better than laptop monitors (brighter, bigger, and sharper).

This depends on the monitor you buy. If you buy a tv for a monitor then it is going to be more expensive than laptops, but brighter, better and sharper. However, if you buy a 10 year old monitor then it is going to be cheap but not so good.

5. Desktops have the capability of producing 7.1 surround sound. All it needs is a $50 sound card and some speakers. I know those speakers are very expensive, but I am trying to say that desktops have the option of that, while laptops do not.

Some speakers use the USB or the headphone plug, which are usually on laptops. So laptops DO have an option of that.
PS. the verge said that:
"A pair of JBL speakers sit on opposite ends of the laptop's base, pumping out sound that's loud and fairly rich. There's no subwoofer, so don't expect much in the way of bass, but I was pleasantly surprised by the audio the Y480 produced. Things start to sound a little distorted at the very highest volume levels, but the overall audio quality is solid"
Then they said that the intelligent mode was not so good, and that is a software problem. Plus, usually movies and stuff do not need the highest volume, unless the computer is far away from you eg when you are projecting something
thepieman

Con

1. 24 F/S is what the movies have been using since the 1920s. The Hobbit will double that this winter, and I think that jump to 48 F/S is long overdue. This article claims "video games should be playable from 30 to 60 F/S". http://www.techsupportforum.com... The Y480's graphics card came out 7 months after Battlefield 3, and it still couldn't keep it from dipping below 30 F/S. Graphics cards are meant to be usable (stay above 30 F/P) with future games, and this one can barely play this game on medium settings. Witcher 2 is a year older than the graphics card, and was playable after lowering the resolution (which means it has to render less pixels) and on lower settings. The normal 640 should maintain above 40 F/P on high, the 640M can hold 40 on medium. The Y480's 640M LE is even worse.

2. Laptops have a higher risk of damage from dropping, because people don't drop desktops. When you are walking around with a laptop, you aren't thinking "don't drop it, don't drop it, don't drop it..." you are working on it. When you move a desktop, all you should be thinking about is "don't drop it, don't drop it, don't drop it..." On the topic of computers breaking, if any part of a desktop fails (hard drives, monitor, RAM, mouse, ect) it can be replaced. If a laptop keyboard fails, you need a new laptop! Batteries die, and then they need replacement; desktops don't.

3. What happens if you run out of USB ports? Laptops only have a few ports, desktop several, and if a desktop runs out of them, then buying a USB PCI card is cheap and easy. My main point of this agreement is that laptop users cannot customize internal hardware like desktops.

4. On buying a mouse and keyboard, desktops often come with those. I have always just had some extra keyboards ad mouses; I never had to go out and buy one (and I am sure I am not the only one with extra stuff). About monitors, I only need one for every couple of desktops; you are forced to buy a new one every time you buy a laptop.

5. Who would buy a laptop and then plug 7 speakers and a subwoofer into it? Laptops are not made for surround sound, while desktops can do anything but physically move.

Laptops can do a lot of useful things, I bring an old laptop with linux on it to my class all the time to take notes and other things. I then come back to my dorm to a powerful desktop with dual monitors and a 5.1 surround system. Desktops can do anything but move, laptop users sacrifice some power for portability. I think it will always be this way: as computer parts become small and more powerful, and then computer software will demand all of its power. Hardware and software are continually forcing each other to be better. So laptops will always be the portable (and weaker) version of desktops. Some people need the portability, and I can see that; but portability is the only thing laptops have on desktops. These days, smartphones are taking over the laptops' job: they can call, text, and surf the web; and it fits in your pocket. Desktops are more powerful, customizable, cheaper, and reliable.
Debate Round No. 3
11 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by watevas808 3 years ago
watevas808
lol the best you guys can do is agree to disagree. There are pros and cons for both. everyone has their own opinion. Laptops are portable desktops have better memory and chips.
Posted by naaptol 4 years ago
naaptol
desktop is more comfortable compared to laptops
Posted by xehraamirrao 4 years ago
xehraamirrao
laptops are easy to handle!
Posted by Whitepowerkkk 4 years ago
Whitepowerkkk
That's a bunch of bull sh!t
Posted by matthewasears 4 years ago
matthewasears
Smart phones are great but not perfect for everything. Would you like to write a research paper on an iPhone? I sure wouldn't. Laptops are more portable than Desktops and are great for taking notes in a meeting for example. Desktops are harder to steal or drop though.
Posted by L3gitSkillz 4 years ago
L3gitSkillz
Alright, I don't know if you're allowed to argue against this, but here are my arguments that DESKTOP > LAPTOP.

Desktop:

-Run's 60-190 FPS on 2540x1600 Resolution with merely 2000 dollars.
-The impact from any drop with a desktop goes directly through the case and not the motherboard along with it's components itself. The reason being that the motherboard is bolted on the side through elevated standoff's, which do not direct for to the motherboard itself.
-Can run 4-way SLI configurations with graphics cards that are much more up-to date than laptop graphics cards. This means 4 GPU's working together on the same task, offering more efficiency, while sacrificing more power comsumption.
-Desktop CPU's are very high end, and can often over clock to 4.5 Ghz +
-Desktop cooling is much, much better as it allows for more airflow throughout the case.
-Desktop's have better storage options as they can hold more hard drives with an increased amount of hard drive bays.

Laptops:

-They only run 30 fps max when using 1366x768 resolution, which is point in which gaming is near unplayable.
-A laptop dropping will spread the force evenly throughout all components, as the whole laptop is restrained in a small environment, often heavily damaging all components.
-Can only run one low-end graphics card, therefore giving an unoptimized gaming performance.
-Base clock's on laptop CPU's sit around the 2-2.8 Ghz range, and usually will not be able to overclock.
-Laptop components are packed together, offering terrible cooling, and in turn shows overheating, and therefore lowers the lifespan of all components in the laptop.
-Storage in laptop's are limited, as they can only use 2.5" Hard drives, or solid state drives, which cost exponentially more expensive yet hold less storage space.

These are my arguments for the desktop and laptop debate, and I am casting one vote to the contender. Thanks!
Posted by darkcity 4 years ago
darkcity
what about having a screen you position where you want, plus expansion. nice debate ; -)
Posted by tuduashok197 4 years ago
tuduashok197
...still not able to decide which one is better, laptop or a desktop,.....but unarguably it was a good debate and I thoroughly enjoyed it.....
Posted by jh1234l 4 years ago
jh1234l
This was fun, though no one voted.
Posted by michael1010 4 years ago
michael1010
Great debate I thought both of you had very interesting points at the end it felt like arguing against one specific laptop sorry can't vote I am to new but if I could I would vote con on this one main point was ease of upgrade and how soon tech is out of date so easier to upgrade on desktop feel free to challenge me in a debate of any kind as well as I am new and would enjoy practice
No votes have been placed for this debate.