The Instigator
JustinLang
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Brandon221423
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Life on other planets

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/20/2015 Category: Science
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 524 times Debate No: 81242
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

JustinLang

Pro

Other than Earth, there are other planets that human has already discovered, that are capable of supporting not only extra-terrestrial life, but human life. Such as Kepler 22b. So, when you look at temperature, kepler 22b has an average of 72 degrees Fahrenheit. Obviously, this is an extremely suitable temperature to sustain human life. Also, kepler 22b has land and oceans almost identical to Earth
Brandon221423

Con

Well there is no argument that life can exist on other planets just as it does here given the correct conditions but we do need to think about the small chance that we may be the first sentient life to ever evolve (Because of the debate being about life on other planets I'm going to ignore creationism for now). It may not be very likely but in an universe of infinite possibility we could be the first. Now lets take what I just said for a second if we are the first and we can reach a planet is close conditions to Earth chances are they may be just lower in the evolution cycle so we could gene splice them in early stages of development and make SPACE MARINES!!! but on a more serious note we could learn so much and do so much that could potentially impact our civilization to no reverse.
Debate Round No. 1
JustinLang

Pro

Time, itself, is infinite. There was no "start" to time, nor was there a "start" to existence. Saying that, think of how new humans are to Earth, we are a 200,000 - 300,000 year old race living on a 4,500,000,000 year old planet. Seems long right? That's not it, Earth itself is one planet, revolving around one star, buried in one galaxy, among the hundreds of BILLIONS of galaxies out there. The universe is theoretically infinite, and again, so is time. So, with that big picture in mind, how are we not to think that at some point, there was no life on other planets, maybe even other homo sapien life. It is a little bit silly for humans to think that in the incomprehensibly large world that we live it, we are the only ones. Going back to the subject of Kepler 22b, also known as one of "Earth's Twins", why is it that we have billions and billions of life forms on Earth, but we are to say that it doesn't exist on Kepler? What if there are billions of planets out there with strikingly similar characteristics that we have not discovered, or never will discover?
Brandon221423

Con

There is also the possibility that in similar planets that we can agree similar actions may have occurred so any other planet that reach nuclear capability simply destroyed them self because they didn't have the global leaders or the exact timeline we had so a country close in ideals to Nazi Germany could have been the first to make the bomb ending in the destruction of their civilization. Outside of the nuclear bomb they could have just done what we are doing to Earth ozone wise but they have million maybe even billion year head start which led to the eventual death of the bio-sphere. To get off a planet it may be necessary to destroy it in the process using the needed industry to achieve space faring abilities so when life on a planet reaches a point where the ozone is unable to keep in the atmosphere the people went to become a fleet based organization where they go planet to planet scouring it of all resources. Maybe all civilization is just fated to destroy itself through the flawed mortal conception that there is always more out there so what you have is expendable so no sentient life can live on a planet for a long period of time. If you are familiar with a Dyson Sphere it could show how we can see any advanced life because the light from the sun isn't reflecting off the surface of the planet(s) so it's seemingly a part of the void.
Debate Round No. 2
JustinLang

Pro

Never in my argument did I say that life on other planets had to be sentient. The point that I am trying to make is that at some point, maybe even now, which is extremely likely, that Earth is not the only planet with mass life. Yes, it is very possible that a civilization of any technologically or mentally advanced species can end up destroying itself. We are discovering more and more about every planet as time goes on. 100 years ago, we believed that we were the only galaxy, afloat in an empty, completely lonely space, with absolutely nothing but other stars. And in this last 100 years, we have sent unmanned spacecrafts to the farthest of planets, we have developed machines capable of discovering stars, planets, and solar systems that we could only imagine reaching. Planets so far away that if we traveled at the speed of light, (670,616,629 MPH) it would take hundreds of years to get to it. My point is, with the unbelievably large number of planets, there is almost a guarantee that somewhere, very likely far enough away that we will never know about it, there is life. Life that may be in a suitable planet for them, but not necessarily for humans.
Brandon221423

Con

Even if they are out there we all die alone anyway.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by adrianbgo 2 years ago
adrianbgo
I may be interested in debating this topic. One quick question before I accept, though: are you saying that life currently exists on other planets, or are you saying that at some point in time, life must have existed on other planets?
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