The Instigator
reggaeman445
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
ColeTrain
Con (against)
Winning
4 Points

Marijuana Legalization

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Post Voting Period
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after 1 vote the winner is...
ColeTrain
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/22/2015 Category: Politics
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 421 times Debate No: 73959
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (3)
Votes (1)

 

reggaeman445

Pro

I support the legalization of marijuana for many reasons. The biggest reason why I'm such a supporter is because the legalization of marijuana in Colorado has shown pure positive effects. In the first six months, over $10,000,000 was raised in tax money, and in the last year, about $3,400,000 was sent to improve schools. Along with the taxation, people should have the freedom to smoke it. It has been scientifically proven that no one has died for overdosing, and it's much safer than alcohol. Along with that, it was also scientifically proven that you are 4 times more likely to get into a car crash while under the influence of alcohol then you are under the influence of marijuana. The reason I bring this point up is not to promote the idea of driving high, but to show that the buzz from marijuana is not nearly as intense as the buzz from alcohol. Continuing on, marijuana has medical benefits. Some, like Tommy Chong, argue that some THC oils can cure cancer in some cases. Whether or not that is true, it has still been shown that marijuana can help slow the process of cancer, and even Alzheimer's.
ColeTrain

Con

Introduction:

Though many have deviated from past standards opposing marijuana legalization, I still stand firm in my belief that marijuana should not be legalized. As I will show in the continuation of this round, there are both moral and pragmatic reasons as to why this illegal drug should not be legalized.

C1) Marijuana is a harmful drug.

No matter what camouflage or disguise is plastered onto it, the substance remains the same: a drug. A drug, is a drug, is a drug, is a drug. Essentially, all drugs have harmful effects. This holds true in regards to marijuana. The University of Washington documents its respiratory effects. “A 2011 systematic review of the research concluded that long-term marijuana smoking is associated with an increased risk of some respiratory problems, including an increase in cough, sputum production, airway inflammation, and wheeze – similar to that of tobacco smoking (Howden & Naughton, 2011).” [1]

But the problem doesn’t stop there. The same article explains, “Additionally, many marijuana smokers also smoke tobacco, which further increases the harm. Numerous studies have found that the harmful effects of smoking marijuana and tobacco appear to be additive, with more respiratory problems in those who smoke both substances than in those who only smoke one or the other (Wu et al, 1988).” [1] Because the use of marijuana is directly linked to cigarette usage, these statistics are relevant as well.

Beyond that, other health problems come from marijuana, including cancer. This is once again detailed by the University of Washington. “Marijuana smoke contains about 50% more benzopyrene and nearly 75% more benzanthracene [than cigarettes], both known carcinogens (Tashkin, 2013). Lung biopsies from habitual marijuana-only users have revealed widespread alterations to the tissue, some of which are recognized as precursors to the subsequent development of cancer (Tashkin, 2013).” Cancer is also a problem when considering the legalization of marijuana. With so many individuals already affected by cancer, increasing its prevalence is an obvious detriment.

Statistically, the potency of the drug is increasing as well. Live Science supports this notion by quoting, “According to research from the Potency Monitoring Project, the average THC content of marijuana has soared from less than 1 percent in 1972, to 3 to 4 percent in the 1990s, to nearly 13 percent today.” [2] THC is the intoxicating chemical in marijuana. The increase in this is causing a more powerful and harmful substance.

C2) Marijuana legalization would result in an increase of marijuana use.

Legalizing a substance, even for strictly medical purposes, is bound to increase use. In fact, the Office of National Drug Control Policy supports this notion. “A recent report from the RAND Corporation, “Altered State,” discusses how legalization would cause the price of marijuana to plummet, triggering increases in use of the drug.” [3] Essentially, the illegal nature of marijuana keeps the prices high. Lower prices would inevitably allow, and even encourage, more people to use the drug. More use encourages more abuse, thereby causing more people to be affected by the aforementioned concerns and health complications.

Although alcohol use is vastly more than marijuana use, legalization would close the gap. Moreover, previous experience with attempts to legalize other drugs (such as Oxycontin) have proven faulty and unsuccessful. Even if controlling methods were implemented, they weren’t effective in regulating even legal use.

C3) Legalization of marijuana reverses moral values.

Although many claim that marijuana is beneficial in medical fields, there is not strong support for this notion. In fact, the Buffalo News points this out. “There is not an adequate base of research that shows marijuana is effective for treating any serious medical condition. Therefore, no major group of medical experts supports the use of smoked marijuana for treatment of health problems.” [4] This shows medical marijuana ineffective. If this is true, marijuana is left to only harm individuals. Thus, legalizing marijuana would promote the harm of individuals rather than the assistance.

If marijuana is legalized to increase revenue, and fabricate a better economy, it serves to value economics above humanity. Morality, however, values humanity inexplicably and irrefutably above the economy. Rhetorically, if humanity is being devalued solely to value economy, what is the need for an economy if humanity is being harmed? In reality, there isn’t a need for economy in this scenario.Since legalization of this drug does devalue humanity, any economic benefits are equally countered by the subsequent devalue of humanity.

C4) Previous legalizations have had adverse effects.

Perhaps the most popular legalization to date, in the US, is Colorado. While many share success stories of the legalization, we find that more relevant are the detrimental effects that are widespread and prevailing. The Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area published a report titled “The Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado: the Impact” that detailed few important consequences of the legislation. Among others, key findings included: “The majority of DUI drug arrests were marijuana related and 25 to 40 percent were marijuana alone... the percent of hospitalizations related to marijuana have increased 82% since 2008… In 2012, 10.47 percent of youth ages 12 to 17 were considered current marijuana users compared to 7.55 percent nationally.” [5] These drastic and dire statistics show that the supposed “benefits” of legalizing marijuana fall without merit, when compared to the detriments and harms.

Furthermore, the governor of Colorado regrets the decision to legalize marijuana. The Daily Mail documents this phenomenon, “Speaking on CBNC, the 62-year-old Democrat said: 'If I could've waved a wand the day after the election, I would've reversed the election and said, "This was a bad idea".'” [6] As the governor realizes the fault with legalizing marijuana, and we understand the consequences that have arisen from the legalization, we must negate the resolution and oppose legalizing marijuana.

Rebuttals:

My opponent first speaks of Colorado, but I have already effectively shown, with evidence (something my opponent lacked) that this claim does not hold water.
He next brings up the fact that people should have the freedom to smoke. However, when economy is valued before humanity, and the preservation of citizens (which is a governments foremost duty), we find that morality is twisted. Instead, humanity should be valued before economy.
His next argument assumes that we should trust his claims rather than credible sources. He has not shown evidence to back up his claims, thus, they fall without merit. Furthermore, even if not as severe, marijuana does have “buzz” and is detrimental (as shown in C1).
He claims that marijuana has medical benefits, but as I showed in C3, this is not scientifically sound. The support for this notion is weak. Besides, I have also brought up multiple arguments detailing and proving that marijuana is a health hazard.

Conclusion:

Conclusively, we find that legalizing marijuana would be an inferior option to the popular status quo. Thus, from a moral and pragmatic standpoint, we are fully obligated to negate the resolution, and keep marijuana illegal in the US.

Sources:


Debate Round No. 1
reggaeman445

Pro

reggaeman445 forfeited this round.
ColeTrain

Con

My opponent has forfeited. Extend arguments.
Debate Round No. 2
reggaeman445

Pro

reggaeman445 forfeited this round.
ColeTrain

Con

My opponent has once again forfeited. Extend arguments.
Debate Round No. 3
reggaeman445

Pro

reggaeman445 forfeited this round.
ColeTrain

Con

My opponent has forfeited. Extend arguments.
Debate Round No. 4
reggaeman445

Pro

reggaeman445 forfeited this round.
ColeTrain

Con

My opponent has forfeited all rounds. Extend all arguments.

VOTE CON!
Debate Round No. 5
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by ColeTrain 1 year ago
ColeTrain
Reggaeman445, what's so funny? How are my arguments?
Posted by reggaeman445 1 year ago
reggaeman445
Hahahahah
Posted by ColeTrain 1 year ago
ColeTrain
8,000k characters... precisely. :P
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by 16kadams 1 year ago
16kadams
reggaeman445ColeTrainTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: FF