The Instigator
1010101001110010101001
Pro (for)
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The Contender
ImTooPixeled
Con (against)
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0 Points

Medical Coverage (Insuance) For Genetic Disease

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/14/2014 Category: Science
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 366 times Debate No: 52448
Debate Rounds (5)
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1010101001110010101001

Pro

"While most Americans are optimistic about the use of genetic information to improve health, many are concerned that genetic information may be used by insurers and employers to deny, limit or cancel their health insurance and to discriminate against them in the workplace. This concern is causing some not to participate in important biomedical research and others to refuse to be tested for genetic disorders."
ImTooPixeled

Con

In many cases, insurance companies will cover genetic testing. Though this is not coverage for curing genetic disease, it allows people to be aware of the chance of having a genetic disease. A person's health coverage price may raise if the insurance company finds out that they have a disease. The total amount of coverage may also go down. In a way, an insurance company may be saving someone money if that person has a genetic disease. So in reality it is smart to not even have the insurance company pay for the test due to the chance of price going up, and coverage going down.
Debate Round No. 1
1010101001110010101001

Pro

"The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) [hhs.gov] was the first step toward implementation of the policy recommendations on health insurance and provided some protection from discrimination, but gaps remain. For the last several years, the Congress has drafted legislation that could address these fears by banning genetic discrimination in health insurance and employment."
ImTooPixeled

Con

Probably one of the main points of this side of the debate is the FACT that 20% of all deaths in America are infants who die because of a genetic disease. 30% of all the adults in hospitals are there because of genetic diseases. Over 10% of babies are born with a disorder. Now 30% of hospitalized adults, 10% of all babies, and 20% of all deaths in America are babies. If insurance covered just the deaths, they would be targets of giving money away 1/5 of all children deaths in America.
Debate Round No. 2
1010101001110010101001

Pro

On October 14, 2003, after years of negotiations, the U.S. Senate passed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2003 (S.1053) [thomas.loc.gov] by a vote of 95-0 after the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee had passed the bill by voice vote in May 2003 with no major changes when the bill came to the floor. Allowing for medical insurance to cover genetic disorders.
ImTooPixeled

Con

Allow me to throw some math at you:
On average there is about 13 deaths a second.
13 x 60 4 a minute
4 x 60 276 an hour
x 24 6646 a day
x 365 2425846 a year.
divided by 20% 485169 disabled kids die a year.

Lets say an insurance company has 100,000,000 dollars. and they give 20 dollars a death.
485169 x 20 = 9703380 dollars a year given.
Now unless that company makes over 100,000,000 a year, the company will go bankrupt in about 10 years.
Debate Round No. 3
1010101001110010101001

Pro

On February 8, 2000, Bill Clinton issued Executive Order 13145, prohibiting discrimination in Federal employment based on genetic information. The Executive Order prohibits federal employers from requesting or requiring any genetic information from their employees, or the use of genetic information in any employment decision. (At the time of releasing this executive order, he expressed support for a federal law prohibiting genetic discrimination by private employers or health insurance issuers.)
ImTooPixeled

Con

The average person lives until about 80. life insurance is about $350 a year. So one person will give 28,000 in a life... sounds good right? Back on the subject on the children, if they die before they are five, 28,00 dollars becomes $320 from kids parents. Money will come in very slow. Investors will demand and the economy will fail. So 499,680 dollars are given for each kids death considering the 500,000 required to be given, multiply that by the amount of kids who die a year from genetic disease. which is equivalent to 242,429,245,920 dollars a year. The world in itself has 1.2 trillion dollars total. Divide the two the WORLD will go bankrupt in 4.9 years!
Debate Round No. 4
1010101001110010101001

Pro

A major provision of The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) [healthcare.gov] is to establish 'guaranteed issue'; issuers offering insurance in either the group or individual market must provide coverage for all individuals who request it. The law therefore prohibits issuers of health insurance from discriminating against patients with genetic diseases by refusing coverage because of 'pre-existing conditions'. ACA further provides additional protections for patients with genetic diseases by establishing that certain health insurance issuers may only vary premiums based on a few specified factors such as age or geographic area, thereby prohibiting the adjustment of premiums because of medical conditions.
ImTooPixeled

Con

To paraphrase my argument as a whole in itself. The world itself physically cannot afford to provide all people health benefits to all people. The world itself would go into major debt if insurance covered treatments for genetic treatments.
Debate Round No. 5
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