The Instigator
Captainross2000
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
wesley106
Pro (for)
Winning
1 Points

NSA Spying

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
wesley106
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/29/2016 Category: Politics
Updated: 10 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 314 times Debate No: 85753
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (4)
Votes (1)

 

Captainross2000

Con

"At least in Europe, we consider the right to privacy a fundamental right, and it is a very serious matter." European Commission President Jos" Manuel Barroso stated at a news conference in 2013 ("20 Great Quotes"). One would think that this would be the same for the United States, since it is thought to be the country of freedom and rights, but one would be gravely mistaken. The United States National Security Agency (NSA) is violating the privacy of every U.S. citizen and U.S. ally. They are tracking phone calls, reading emails, and worst of all, hypocritically betraying everyone. The NSA should stop stalking U.S. citizens and allies for the fact that phone calls and emails are private, and trust between allies is vital to our survival as a nation.
wesley106

Pro

First, this is the United States of America, not Europe and be sure not to get the two confused. Due to the fact that the United States of America is a country that holds murder and terrorism rates higher than most countries, the National Security Agency viewing our lives from my perspective is a good thing. If you are putting things in your e-mails that you want no one to read, then simply don't send them and don't talk about it on the phone. Face to face conversations hold just as much importance as one over social media or a cellular device would. The National Security Agency has a reason to be viewing our private lives and that's for one sole purpose, to protect us. Unless you want another incident such as 9/11 or other terrorist acts such as the ones in Paris and the Boston Marathon, I don't see how you could not consider the National Security Agency "spying" as not a threat. Every other American has come to the conclusion that the government does have a birdseye view of our lifes and that's how it will continue to be.
Debate Round No. 1
Captainross2000

Con

Captainross2000 forfeited this round.
wesley106

Pro

First, this is the United States of America, not Europe and be sure not to get the two confused. Due to the fact that the United States of America is a country that holds murder and terrorism rates higher than most countries, the National Security Agency viewing our lives from my perspective is a good thing. If you are putting things in your e-mails that you want no one to read, then simply don't send them and don't talk about it on the phone. Face to face conversations hold just as much importance as one over social media or a cellular device would. The National Security Agency has a reason to be viewing our private lives and that's for one sole purpose, to protect us. Unless you want another incident such as 9/11 or other terrorist acts such as the ones in Paris and the Boston Marathon, I don't see how you could not consider the National Security Agency "spying" as not a threat. Every other American has come to the conclusion that the government does have a birdseye view of our lifes and that's how it will continue to be.
Debate Round No. 2
Captainross2000

Con

Captainross2000 forfeited this round.
wesley106

Pro

I think that sums it up.
Debate Round No. 3
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by PericIes 10 months ago
PericIes
Privacy? In Europe? Maybe some countries, but look, for example, at the U.K. http://www.telegraph.co.uk...
Posted by TdracoHoward 10 months ago
TdracoHoward
It is very funny how this always crops up but nothing is ever done about it. In the end the public cry out to be protected from international and domestic terrorists, but when we tell them how we are doing it they scream injustice and violation of their privacy. Every country spies on its own citizens from the usa (NSA) to the uk (MI5) to china (MSS), how else do you expect them to stop another 9/11?
Posted by Kamusta123 10 months ago
Kamusta123
It really depends on the degree of monitoring and securities that is allowed and isn't allowed. It's great that whistleblowers like Edward Snowden has given light to this for public eyes because these issues need to be discussed as there are clear needs for sanctions/rules/boundaries to be placed between what is considered an important part of national security and a violation of privacy. In the end, it becomes consensus between the degree security at the cost of the privacy.

To me, John Oliver's topic on 'Government Surveillance' was an entertaining and informative way of talking about this kind of topic.
Source: https://www.youtube.com...
Posted by Citizen_of_the_Web 10 months ago
Citizen_of_the_Web
So what is your debate question?
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by U.n 9 months ago
U.n
Captainross2000wesley106Tied
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Total points awarded:01 
Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture