The Instigator
Doulos1202
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
jpvn14
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Performance enhancing supplements are not necessary and absolutely harmful for teens

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Post Voting Period
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/23/2012 Category: Health
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,601 times Debate No: 24393
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (8)
Votes (0)

 

Doulos1202

Pro

Unfortunately I received no rebuttals from last argument so I have re-submitted and hope that Con will be able to finish the debate.

I am arguing that I am not against the use of supplements geared towards athletic performance. I do believe that the recreational use of supplements for teens/young adults between the ages of 16 and 22 are not necessary and more harmful than beneficial to the individual. To keep the debate interesting, I am open to all supplements both legal/illegal which are considered "performance enhancers" or "dietary" with the exception of multivitamins. To avoid confusion I will provide definitions of the focal point of the argument. I look forward to an engaging debate as this is growing more controversial as the supplement industry continues to rapidly grow.

rec•re•a•tion•al
(of a drug or medication) used for recreation and enjoyment rather than to treat a medical condition.

sup•ple•ment
Something added to complete a thing, supply a deficiency, or reinforce or extend a whole.

Round 1 Acceptance
Round 2 Opening arguments
Round 3 Rebuttals
Round 4 Rebuttals and closing arguments
jpvn14

Con

First off, I would like to thank Doulos1202 for creating this debate and giving me the opportunity to express my feelings in the form of an argument. I personally do not condone the use of Performance Enhancing Drugs and/or Supplements whether they are illegal or not. But, I believe that in small quantities they are not harmful to teenagers.

I look forward to further informing you on this topic.
Debate Round No. 1
Doulos1202

Pro

Thank you Jpvn14 for accepting this debate, I will be speaking of the following supplements:

Thermogenics (fat Burners), creatine (specifically monohydrate), protein, testosterone boosters, BCAA's, growth hormone supplements and anabolic steroids.

I will once again state that I am not against the use of performance enhancing supplements but there is a big however. There are many factors as to why the listed supplements can be more harmful than beneficial to the individual also not necessary seeing how at that age the body is still developing and still producing necessary hormones to keep up with activities, from sedentary to rigorous.

Supplements that promise not only faster results but better results influence the attitude that hard work comes secondary to the type of supplements you are taking in. All of the ingredients that supplements offer (proteins, amino acids, and vitamins) can be adequately provided with a healthy diet. Our food supply provides a unique balance that cannot be duplicated by taking any combination of supplements. In addition, eating is one of life's pleasures. However, it is evident by supplement sales totaling over $23.7 billion a year that much is invested in the hope that supplements will help. [1]

The body also treats the listed supplements above as "synthetic". For example to effectively load creatine monohydrate in the body the user must not only take increased amounts for the first 5 days but must also continue a consistent regiment of it for months at a time to start seeing noticeable results. [2] Over time the body will slowly cease to producing natural ATP (ingredient found in creatine, transfers chemical energy to promote metabolism). Once the individual decides to cease taking creatine he/she faces the consequences increased muscle deterioration due to the fact that the body must fight to catch up producing natural chemicals. The same goes for protein supplements, testosterone, and fat burners (if requested either by the voters or Con I will gladly go into detail).

Collectively these supplements also strain vital organs due to the difficulty of digestion. The two in particular being the kidneys and liver take the brunt of the damage. According to Mayo Clinic, the kidneys and liver work to eliminate the by-products of protein metabolism, and may be taxed by the overuse of protein shakes and similar products. Over an extended period of time, protein shakes can damage the liver or kidneys, or may worsen pre-existing cases of organ failure. [3]

Thermogenics, and pre-workout supplements combined also quickly dehydrate the body seeing how they are both packed with doses of up to 200mg of caffeine in their products. [4] This is not including the energy drinks, coffee, and other stimulants the individual may be taking daily.

With BCAA's (Branched chain Amino Acids) the body must undergo rigorous amounts of training to adequately balance the amount of BCAA's being digested into the body. Once again both essential and nonessential amino acids can be provided through a healthy diet. The majority of these supplements offer some portion of BCAA's. Research has shown that massive amounts of BCAA's can be harmful to the liver. [5]

Let's talk about anabolic steroids; I will say that there are large quantities of evidence those anabolic steroids to provide medicinal benefits to those who need it (i.e. muscular dystrophy, patients with low T cells, COPD, and other hormone deficiencies) however this is not the argument. The potential for abuse increases drastically of those using AS recreationally. Not only that the lack of education of AS can lead significant medical complications due to higher risk of misuse dosages and improper handling. Another study combined methyltestosterone (15 mg/d) with imipramine (25-50 mg/d) and found a prompt paranoid response in 4 of 5 men treated. In a 1983 study of 32 weightlifters using AASs, 56% reported a temporary increase in self-defined irritability and aggressive behavior. When these psychoactive effects combine with strong positive reinforcement from weight and strength gains, as well as from improved self-image, AASs can prove addictive. [6]

[1] http://www.ext.colostate.edu......
[2] http://reference.medscape.com......
[3] http://www.livestrong.com......
[4] http://www.gnc.com......
[5] http://www.health24.com......
[6] http://emedicine.medscape.com......
jpvn14

Con

Since I am Con, I will start by rebutting my opponent. I'll take various quotes from his argument, and prove they are not true in all cases. Then, I will further precede by verbalizing my own opinions.

"Supplements that promise not only faster results but better results influence the attitude that hard work comes secondary to the type of supplements you are taking in."

That quote is completely dependent on the teenager. Many teenagers may value hard work, but use just a little Performance Enhancing Supplement to give them an "extra boost." Believe it or not, most teenagers are aware that these Supplements are dangerous and that they should limit the amount they partake of.

"All of the ingredients that supplements offer (proteins, amino acids, and vitamins) can be adequately provided with a healthy diet."

While Pro speaks truth about this matter, the amount and power of the amino acids in a "healthy diet" would be no where near the amount in Supplements. For instance, L-Arginine is an amino acid found in many performance Enhancing Supplements. Even the healthiest eater in the world cannot get that amount of proteins, vitamins, and/or amino acids whilst eating naturally. [1]

"In addition, eating is one of life's pleasures. However, it is evident by supplement sales totaling over $23.7 billion a year that much is invested in the hope that supplements will help."

Whether or not the teenager takes P.E. Supplements, I'm pretty sure he/she will still eat a hefty amount, especially if it's a boy. Have you seen those teenagers eat at buffets? Let me tell you, they realize the importance of food too well. Also, nowhere on the internet could I find a figure that said the sales for supplements totaled over $23.7 billion. The link you gave guided me to some Colorado State University website about agriculture.

"The body also treats the listed supplements above as "synthetic". For example to effectively load creatine monohydrate in the body the user must not only take increased amounts for the first 5 days but must also continue a consistent regiment of it for months at a time to start seeing noticeable results. [2] Over time the body will slowly cease to producing natural ATP (ingredient found in creatine, transfers chemical energy to promote metabolism). Once the individual decides to cease taking creatine he/she faces the consequences increased muscle deterioration due to the fact that the body must fight to catch up producing natural chemicals. The same goes for protein supplements, testosterone, and fat burners (if requested either by the voters or Con I will gladly go into detail)."

In large quantities, this is true. However, to the teenagers who use supplements, especially testosterone, this is utterly unfair and incorrect. Upon research of some supplements, I found that these supplements begin to work in less than a month's time. [2] You are wrong when you say a person must "also continue a consistent regiment of it for months at a time to start seeing noticeable results." While this is true for some supplements, this is not the case for most.

"Collectively these supplements also strain vital organs due to the difficulty of digestion. The two in particular being the kidneys and liver take the brunt of the damage. According to Mayo Clinic, the kidneys and liver work to eliminate the by-products of protein metabolism, and may be taxed by the overuse of protein shakes and similar products. Over an extended period of time, protein shakes can damage the liver or kidneys, or may worsen pre-existing cases of organ failure."

The key phrase in Pro's argument above is: "over an extended period of time." As mentioned before, you are assuming all supplement users are going to be taking these products for months or years on end. According to a CNN report, doctors have found little to no risks or side effects for short term supplement users. [3]

"Thermogenics, and pre-workout supplements combined also quickly dehydrate the body seeing how they are both packed with doses of up to 200mg of caffeine in their products. This is not including the energy drinks, coffee, and other stimulants the individual may be taking daily."

Don't let this seemingly high number of caffeine fool you. After all, there is more caffeine in one cup of Dunkin Donuts coffee then there is in some of the most powerful supplements. [4] Plus, most teenagers don't drink too much coffee per day anyway, so I don't think this factor should even be in consideration.

"Let's talk about anabolic steroids; I will say that there are large quantities of evidence those anabolic steroids to provide medicinal benefits to those who need it (i.e. muscular dystrophy, patients with low T cells, COPD, and other hormone deficiencies) however this is not the argument. The potential for abuse increases drastically of those using AS recreationally. Not only that the lack of education of AS can lead significant medical complications due to higher risk of misuse dosages and improper handling. Another study combined methyltestosterone (15 mg/d) with imipramine (25-50 mg/d) and found a prompt paranoid response in 4 of 5 men treated. In a 1983 study of 32 weightlifters using AASs, 56% reported a temporary increase in self-defined irritability and aggressive behavior. When these psychoactive effects combine with strong positive reinforcement from weight and strength gains, as well as from improved self-image, AASs can prove addictive."

Notice he amount of supplements those tested were taking. The doses these men/women were taking are far more than the usual athlete, let alone a teenager looking for a "boost." Small amounts are not addictive.

[1] http://www.slideshare.net...
[2] http://www.arginmax.com...
[3]http://www-cgi.cnn.com...
[4] http://www.cspinet.org...
Debate Round No. 2
Doulos1202

Pro

Well done Con, I will respect your format by doing the same this next round. Unfortunately it appears that you took small pieces of my arguments without addressing several of the claims in regards of necessity of supplements/harm. So because I love details, let's dive right in to each argument presented.

"While Pro speaks truth about this matter, the amount and power of the amino acids in a "healthy diet" would be no where near the amount in Supplements. For instance, L-Arginine is an amino acid found in many performance Enhancing Supplements. Even the healthiest eater in the world cannot get that amount of proteins, vitamins, and/or amino acids whilst eating naturally."

While Con offers the idea that pumping more Amino Acids specifically L-Arginine into the body surpasses a natural diet. He fails to see the catch 22 that by introducing "high amounts" of synthetic supplements raises the risk of several complications. Some side effects include; L-arginine can cause an allergic response or make swelling in the airways worse. If you decide to take L-arginine, use it with caution. L-arginine might lower blood pressure. This could be a problem if you already have low blood pressure. It can also cause side effects such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, gout, blood abnormalities. Seeing how the FDA has not yet approved/disapproved the majority of supplements on the shelf, the supplement provider is not obligated to tell you how much is in their product. They legally get away with slapping "proprietary blend" on their bottles keeping you from seeing the rest of the ingredients. This became a law in 1994 putting the BOP on the FDA that the supplements are either harmful or beneficial. [1][2]

"Whether or not the teenager takes P.E. Supplements, I'm pretty sure he/she will still eat a hefty amount, especially if it's a boy. Have you seen those teenagers eat at buffets? Let me tell you, they realize the importance of food too well. Also, nowhere on the internet could I find a figure that said the sales for supplements totaled over $23.7 billion. The link you gave guided me to some Colorado State University website about agriculture."

Being "pretty sure" does not add much weight to your argument if you do not have evidence to back it up. I revisited the link with no problems so I am not sure as to why you are unable too I will repost the link as [3] on my sources. Until then my previous argument goes without refutation.

"In large quantities, this is true. However, to the teenagers who use supplements, especially testosterone, this is utterly unfair and incorrect. Upon research of some supplements, I found that these supplements begin to work in less than a month's time. [2] You are wrong when you say a person must "also continue a consistent regiment of it for months at a time to start seeing noticeable results." While this is true for some supplements, this is not the case for most."

I am so happy you brought up testosterone as this is one of my favorites. A young teenage male between the ages of 16-22 who is otherwise healthy is in no need of increasing his testosterone levels more than they are already at. Teenagers do not need to be increasing their libido more than it already is. This argument is about recreational use of athletic performance, not the use for medicinal purposes. The male teenage body may produce as much as the equivalent of 300 milligrams of exogenous testosterone each week which is optimal for healthy muscle development. [4]

"The key phrase in Pro's argument above is: "over an extended period of time." As mentioned before, you are assuming all supplement users are going to be taking these products for months or years on end. According to a CNN report, doctors have found little to no risks or side effects for short term supplement users. [3]"

I would like to pull a quote from the very link Con has provided:

"Your liver produces about 2 grams of creatine each day. You can also get creatine from the meat in your diet. Creatine is stored in your muscles, and levels are relatively easily maintained. Because your kidneys remove excess creatine, the value of supplements to someone who already has high muscle creatine content is questionable."

This is more evidence that a healthy diet is completely capable of providing the necessary nutrients you need to keep your body going. The majority of "size" individuals see from the use of creatine specifically is water retention which quickly deteriorates after the individual discontinues use. [5] As con accuses me of assuming all supplement users take the products for an extended period of time I could easily ask he assumes they are not. I am simply stating that they are not necessary and harmful to the body's natural development.

"Don't let this seemingly high number of caffeine fool you. After all, there is more caffeine in one cup of Dunkin Donuts coffee then there is in some of the most powerful supplements. [4] Plus, most teenagers don't drink too much coffee per day anyway, so I don't think this factor should even be in consideration."

Thermogenics (fat burners) contain different amounts of different types of ingredients. I will start by stating the function of fat burners and the downside of discontinuing use. FB typically contain a large amount of caffeine along with herbal extracts to increase metabolism. The majority of them direct the individual to take the supplement throughout the day giving a steady stream of the ingredients. As they increase your metabolic rate, they can lead to a number of side effects such as heart palpitations, high blood pressure, anxiety or irritability, tightness in the chest and even heart attacks. Once the individual decides to no longer take the product, the body then must work even harder to keep the metabolism going at the rate it once was. Often times the individual will see the unwanted weight come back.

Several Fat burners have been banned by the FDA because of the severe liver damage they do. According to SteadyHealth.com, a common ingredient in fat burners is chromium picolinate. Consumed in excess, chromium can reduce the binding ability of iron, and can lead to anemia or other problems. Two other common ingredients, rimonabant and sibutramine, carry FDA warnings because they can lead to myriad health effects, ranging from heart attack or stroke to an increased risk of depression.[6] These are fat burners alone, and not including the risks of combing other supplements (stacking) which is commonly done.

"Notice he amount of supplements those tested were taking. The doses these men/women were taking are far more than the usual athlete, let alone a teenager looking for a "boost." Small amounts are not addictive."

These are the result of recreational use by the individual. There is a significant difference in risk factors when comparing medicinal use to recreational. AS has significant impacts on the function of several organs so you can imagine the amount of side effects come with the use. Even after 2 months use of AS the body stops producing natural testosterone due to the massive amounts of synthetic versions. The body is smart and also recognizes that there is now an improper balance of testosterone vs. estrogen this leads to a spike with estrogen production which can explain mood swings and even hot flashes. Once the user decides to discontinue taking AS recreationally they face a huge shift in hormones. The body is no longer producing natural testosterone and is now producing massive amounts of estrogen. Such mood swings can cause an entirely different realm of psychological risks. [7]

In conclusion I have carried BOP that Performance Enhancing Supplements are not necessary and absolutely harmful for teens. I would like to thank Con in participating in this discussion and thank those viewing for taking the time to read it. Sources in comments.
jpvn14

Con

jpvn14 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
8 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 8 records.
Posted by Double_R 4 years ago
Double_R
Athletic performance is simply the carrying out of physical activity. I don't think you are challenging someone to argue that performance enhancing supplements are necessary for someone to weight lift. It sounds like you are arguing that they are not necessary for increasing ones athletic ability to the same level they would have achieved by using them. If so, I think it would be a good idea to clarify that.
Posted by Doulos1202 4 years ago
Doulos1202
Ill consider it, these are significant changes to the resolution.
Posted by bluesteel 4 years ago
bluesteel
I'd argue for protein supplements, but you've made it so I can't accept.

If you want to debate whether people 18+ should be allowed to use steroids (for example in professional sports), I'll defend that. I won't defend them as non-harmful, but that people should have a choice.
Posted by Doulos1202 4 years ago
Doulos1202
Not necessary for athletic performance. For example fitness (weightlifting and cardio), sports, and weight loss. Would it be easier placing BOP on myself even more so if I change "potential" to "absolutely". If so I will be happy to.
Posted by Double_R 4 years ago
Double_R
Not necessary for what? This seems like a very easy victory for Con if you do not explain that in your resolution. And I am not sure that anyone would argue against them being potentially harmful to teens, but you never know.
Posted by Doulos1202 4 years ago
Doulos1202
Yes, Con would be arguing for the recreational use of supplements to enhance athletic performance between the ages of 16-22.

Specifically
Thermogenics (fat Burners), creatine (specifically monohydrate), protein, testosterone boosters, BCAA's, growth hormone supplements and anabolic steroids.

Did you have something else in mind?
Posted by FourTrouble 4 years ago
FourTrouble
does the supplement have to specific to athletic performance?
No votes have been placed for this debate.