The Instigator
bluerunner87
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
GoldenDragon29
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Personal Searches in School

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/25/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 506 times Debate No: 46684
Debate Rounds (3)
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Votes (0)

 

bluerunner87

Con

Searching schools is a violation of the 4th amendment, one of the basic rights. So, if we are violating that amendment, why don't we just violate the right of religion or free speech? In short, it is not fair to violate the 4th amendment, privacy.
GoldenDragon29

Pro

My opponent has stated that Personal Searches in school is violating the 4th amendment. But is this statement accurate?
I have found evidence that under "reasonable suspicion" it is legal for school officials to search students personal belongings.

http://www.infoplease.com...

I would feel awfully unsafe if I heard a rumor going on that someone had a weapon in school. Sure...it's just a rumor, but what if it is true?
Violating other amendments would have direct punishments, but under "reasonable suspicion" searches are not violating the 4th amendment.
Debate Round No. 1
bluerunner87

Con

I see what you are saying, but by violating the 4th amendment in schools, you are just making it OK to violate all amendments, all basic rights. Sometimes, schools do these searches at random, taking a student's things to rummage through them, and some schools do pat downs after RANDOM SEARCHES. Some schools even make students pay $5 to get their stuff back. And if you are going to do it based on rumors, you need to get some evidence based off of that.
GoldenDragon29

Pro

The searches that I am talking about are NOT random. One other point that I would like to state is that, lockers are the school's property: so therefore, the contents inside of the locker are subject to periodic administrative searches, and districts reserve the right to search lockers without the consent of the student if necessary.

Since I see you have not completely grasped the concept of the T.L.O case, the T.L.O case made it legal for school officials to search students belongings. Schools can use metal detectors for weapons, but that will not stop drugs and substances from entering school grounds.
Debate Round No. 2
bluerunner87

Con

Ask yourself this question, though: "What defines a reasonable suspicion?" Because if you are going to search a locker off of a student's consent, it could be a rumor that they've heard or even trying to get revenge on the other student for something in the past. Then what does this do?
GoldenDragon29

Pro

If the "reasonable suspicion" is a rumor, what does the other student have to hide? They should be willing to let the school officials search their belongings with ease if they have nothing to hide. You brought up some points but you have not provided enough information to convince me about how these points are accurate.
Debate Round No. 3
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