The Instigator
Piratemir144
Pro (for)
Losing
7 Points
The Contender
Johnicle
Con (against)
Winning
13 Points

Public schools shuld not give out homework

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/2/2009 Category: Education
Updated: 7 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 8,573 times Debate No: 10314
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (3)

 

Piratemir144

Pro

Nowadays, students can not indulge in any activities other than those included in their school syllabus. School takes up half of the day, while the other half is wasted on homework. Students can only take a short nap after their school, and then start completing their homework. Homework is done when it's nearly time for bed, and Mom starts telling them to go to sleep. Weekends, instead of bringing fun, bring a diary full of test schedules, and a sleepless night plus a tense day.

Thus, homework is more of a burden than any help to the students. Keeping this in mind, anyone can come to the conclusion that homework should be abolished. To compensate the loss, school hours can be increased. It may also help if only four or five periods are held in class, so that students can understand and memorize the lesson then and there. In this way, students can spend appropriate time on study, and the remaining time on other healthy activities like Sports, Reading, and Writing etc.

This will also give time to students to spend with their family. To conclude, homework should be abolished, but steps should be taken to compensate the loss. In this way we might also see many budding sports persons, writers etc who will bring pride to their families and their nation too.
Johnicle

Con

I will be supporting the idea that homework is essential for a child's academic progress. Should schools be giving less homework? Maybe... but since this topic indulges us to completely abolish homework, I am inclined to defend the position that homework, even in small doses, is required for a proper education.

There is no doubt that teachers may go overboard with the amount of homework they assign to their students. On other occasions, however, teachers under-assign homework. The education system is not black and white like my opponents topic presupposes, but a middle ground can be found. If I was asked to fix the education system there are many things I would implement, but none of them would cause abolition of homework, and here's why:

1. Homework allows for parents to guide educational advancement.
---Source: http://www.theallineed.com...
- "Teachers need to have parents on their side, not for the teacher's benefit, but for the child's. When a parent gets involved and stays involved on a routine basis, this catapults the child to another level. A parent who reads to a child, models life-long learning, participate in school events and monitors homework time is doing his or her job of setting up the child for success."

2. There needs to be learning going on outside of school since currently established school hours simply do not have enough leniency.
-My opponent gets at the idea that if we extend school hours, there would be no need for homework. But not only does this eliminate my first reason for how essential homework is, but it furthers the amount of money that economically suffering school systems have to put into teachers pay. Adding even just one day to the school year would cost America billions of dollars in the long run.
---Source: http://bctf.ca...
- Take year-round schooling as an example... "In some cases, year-round schooling has clearly cost more." ... Although my opponent hinted at adding hours at the end of days instead of adding days, the same concept applies. Time is money and adding time to any school system would cost school districts vital money.

3. Homework adds a 2nd way to make sure that students have learned the curriculum.
---Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk...
- "Young people are under far too much pressure to do well in exams, says an expert in teenager suicides. For some the pressure is more than they can bear."
-If we were to just eliminate homework, it would have a significant impact on how exams effected the grades of students. Increasing this impact, would increase the stress that minors undergo while in the process of studying, and taking, every exam. Homework is a good way to not only learn the material in the class, but to furthermore have a secondary alternative to grading a students performance.

I shall further my stance in the next round. Thanks for the opportunity and good luck!
Debate Round No. 1
Piratemir144

Pro

Homework is of little benefit to students from junior kindergarten to Grade 6, say the authors of a just-released Canadian study, who also found it is often the source of stress and burnout in children, as well the cause of conflict – even marital stress – for many families.

In the first-ever look at the homework load in this country, the study by two Toronto professors found homework rates vary wildly from student to student, and from grade to grade, with some Grade 2 students spending less than 10 minutes a night, while others log more than 45 minutes.

On average, Ontario students spend almost 40 minutes on homework a night, compared to 32.6 minutes in other provinces, which, statistically, is significantly more, say the authors.

While research shows some benefits to homework in grades 7 and 8 and high school, there's scant evidence that it improves student achievement in the younger years, say professors Linda Cameron and Lee Bartel of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto.

Parent Mary-Margaret McMahon, a mother of two children at Gledhill Junior Public School in Toronto, believes children need more unstructured time.

Both of her children have had homework since junior kindergarten – when they brought home books to read several times a week. Her daughter, in Grade 3, does about half an hour of homework a night and her older son, in Grade 4, about an hour.

In fact, studies have shown that reading with, or to, children every day is the only conclusive way to boost their academic success, and Cameron believes that should be the only "homework" for younger children.

She and Bartel released their report to a group of about 55 teachers, parents and principals who gathered Tuesday night at a Scarborough elementary school to discuss reforming the Toronto District School Board's homework policy. The board voted to look into the issue after complaints students are saddled with too much work outside of school.

There is a growing body of research in the U.S. that has found homework isn't all it's cracked up to be, and a growing number of parents who say because of homework and other demands, children have no downtime; one writer has even gone so far as to say today's children have a "nature deficit disorder." Some American elementary schools have cut back or entirely banned homework.

Cameron and Bartel embarked on this study because of the lack of comparative Canadian data.

In their study, more than 1,000 parents were surveyed and said while they like the good work habits homework promotes, as well as how it helps parents be involved in their children's academic lives, the amount students are getting is interfering with family time, play time, causing stress and even marital troubles.

"Kids are at school for six and a half hours ... and some are on buses at 7:30 in the morning and get home from school at 4:30 or 5 o'clock. That's a very long day, and then they are supposed to do homework?" said Bartel in an interview.

Generally, students should spend 10 minutes per night per grade on homework. Toronto public school board guidelines recommend 10 to 30 minutes for junior kindergarten to Grade 3; 30 to 60 minutes from grades 4 to 6; 45 to 90 from grades 7 to 9; and up to 120 minutes for older high school students.

Karen Grose, the Toronto board's superintendent of programs, told those at Tuesday's meeting that in some cases, the guidelines are being used as "a floor, not a ceiling." But she also noted that time requirements can be tricky, as one assignment may take a child 10 minutes to complete, while a struggling student could take much longer.

Board staff are to present trustees with a report in April or May about possible homework reforms.

Parent Frank Bruni, one of the driving forces behind the review, has said he believes children are so busy with homework, they have little family time or time to exercise and keep fit. He'd like to see no homework on weekends or during holiday breaks.

Trustee Josh Matlow believes the process will lead to profound changes in the way homework is dealt with in Toronto schools.

A recent survey of Toronto public board students found that those in grades 7 and 8 reported 10 hours of homework per week, and those in grades 9 to 12 were doing 12 hours per week. Many of those students also took part in music or sports, as well as holding down a part-time job.

Aurelija Jusyte, in Grade 12 at Humberside Collegiate, said high school students always complain about homework.

"They understand that assignments are building their skills, but it's the busy work that doesn't get anything done" that's frustrating, said Jusyte, who is one of two student trustees on the Toronto District School Board. Personally, she enjoys homework.

The Canadian homework study, which focused on Ontario, found that almost 20 per cent of students in the same grade as Jusyte spend more than two hours on homework a night. Cameron said that any longer than that and students' brains are "maxed out."

The study also found:

* Not only does homework cut into family time, it becomes a primary source of arguments, power struggles and is disruptive to building a strong family, including putting strain on marriages. Bruni said it even negatively affects family holidays.
* A large number of children in kindergarten are assigned homework, most of it "drill and practice."
* 28 per cent of Grade 1 students and more than 50 per cent of Grade 2 students spend more than 20 minutes on homework daily.
* While there's no real difference in the attitude of children toward homework, Ontario parents definitely feel more negative about it than others across the country.
* More than three-quarters of parents with children in Grade 4 and under help their children with homework. But, by Grade 4, only half of parents feel they are competent enough to do so.
* Parents are unsure about the benefits of homework; by Grade 5, just 20 per cent of parents feel it has a "positive effect on achievement."
* Half of children in junior kindergarten are enthusiastic about homework; by Grade 6, it drops to just 6 per cent and by Grade 12, just 4 per cent.

The researchers also came across several themes from parent comments – that homework is too difficult or the assignment unclear, that it cuts into family time and causes stress at home and that children are left with little time to play.

Homework has been a hot topic since the 1980s, when Ronald Reagan began peppering his speeches with talk of back-to-basics, more rigorous schooling as the way to economic prosperity, said Bartel. In Ontario, the Conservative government under Mike Harris
Johnicle

Con

In my opponent's last speech, he simply went to an article about homework and copy/pasted it. (As seen here http://www.thestar.com...). In pasting this article, my opponent has successfully done the following,

1. Failed to refute my arguments.
2. Plagiarized the article.
3. Supported my original case idea.

--- "Generally, students should spend 10 minutes per night per grade on homework."

--- "In their study, more than 1,000 parents were surveyed and said while they like the good work habits homework promotes, as well as how it helps parents be involved in their children's academic lives, the amount students are getting is interfering with family time, play time, causing stress and even marital troubles."

--> Both of these ideas support my original thesis that teachers may go overboard with homework. But that is absolutely NO reason to accept this resolution that all "Public schools should* not give out homework." Since my opponent gives no alternative to the lost work ethic and lost educational foundation, only the con side achieves any sort of benefit whatsoever.

I would like to challenge my opponent to give me a reason, that has already been established in his case or article, that under no circumstances should a student receive homework. A few immediate benefits do not outweigh the exponentially greater benefits that homework achieves in the long run.

Finally I would like to flow through my original case points.

1. Homework allows for parents to guide educational advancement.
2. There needs to be learning going on outside of school since currently established school hours simply do not have enough leniency.
3. Homework adds a 2nd way to make sure that students have learned the curriculum.

All of these were backed with evidence and all of these went dropped. Combine this with all of the other reasons given throughout this speech and I can see nothing but a CON vote.

Thank you and good luck!
Debate Round No. 2
Piratemir144

Pro

Piratemir144 forfeited this round.
Johnicle

Con

I would like to thank my opponent for this debate and urge an extension on all of the many dropped arguments.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by hot639 4 years ago
hot639
Excuse me, but since he plagiarized, he therefore has better spelling and grammar!
Posted by Procrastarian 7 years ago
Procrastarian
Piratemir... what a fitting name.

Plagiarism = Very very uncool = LOSS
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by Cliff.Stamp 6 years ago
Cliff.Stamp
Piratemir144JohnicleTied
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Vote Placed by Antonio12 6 years ago
Antonio12
Piratemir144JohnicleTied
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Vote Placed by Johnicle 7 years ago
Johnicle
Piratemir144JohnicleTied
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