The Instigator
332059
Con (against)
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The Contender
CodeFunny
Pro (for)
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Resolved: On balance Standardized testing is beneficial to K-12 education in the United States

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/20/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 9 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 413 times Debate No: 85204
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (3)
Votes (0)

 

332059

Con

Ken Robinson said "Now the problem with standardized tests is that it's based on the mistake that we can simply scale up the education of children like you would scale up making carburetors. And we can't, because human beings are very different from motorcars, and they have feelings about what they do and motivations in doing it, or not." With this, I don"t not agree with the following resolution.

1 Standardized Test does not show respect
-Tampio 14( Nicholas Tamio/ www.cnn.com/ Why Common Core test are Bad/ April 24, 2014/ November 18,2015/ http://www.cnn.com...

According to the 2014 New York Testing Program School Administrator's Manual, parents may eventually review students' responses to open-ended questions, but they are not allowed to look at the test itself. Although educators are under a gag order from New York State and Pearson that prohibits them from discussing specifics of the tests, Principal Elizabeth Phillips of PS 321 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, and other educators across the state have decried the ELA exams as confusing and developmentally inappropriate. The situation may be the same in mathematic]s. Stanford professor James Milgram argues that the Common Core math standards do not command international respect and will not prepare students for STEM careers. If the state keeps hiding the exams from public scrutiny, then parents and educators have a right to doubt their pedagogical value.

2 Standardized testing has swelled and mutated
-Kohn 00(Alfie Kohn/ www.alfiekoh.org/ Standardized testing and It"s Victims/ September 27, 2000/ November 18, 2015/ http://math.buffalostate.edu...)

Non-Instructional factors explain most of the variance among test scores when schools or districts are compared. A study of math results on the 1992 National Assessment of Educational Progress found that the combination of four such variables (number of parents living at home, parents' educational background, type of community, and poverty rate) accounted for a whopping 89 percent of the differences in state scores. To the best of my knowledge, all such analyses of state tests have found comparable results, with the numbers varying only slightly as a function of which socioeconomic variables were considered. Norm-referenced tests were never intended to measure the quality of learning or teaching. The Stanford, Metropolitan, and California Achievement Tests (SAT, MAT, and CAT), as well as the Iowa and Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS and CTBS), are designed so that only about half the test-takers will respond correctly to most items. The main objective of these tests is to rank, not to rate; to spread out the scores, not to gauge the quality of a given student or school.

3 Testing Does Not Measure up for Americans
-Kappan 15 (http://web.a.ebscohost.com... September 2015/ November 23, 2015/ http://pdkpoll2015.pdkintl.org...)

Overall, most Americans believe there"s too much emphasis on standardized testing in public schools, and they rank standardized testing lower than other approaches to measuring student progress such as examples of student work, grades awarded by the teacher, or written observations by the teacher. But, when the results are broken out by demographics, two important groups of Americans " blacks and Hispanics " are somewhat more likely than whites to say that results of standardized tests are very important to improve schools and compare school quality.

With this evidence of standardized testing is bad, I believe that the resolution should be changed.
CodeFunny

Pro

Hello everyone, and thank you Con for instigating. I accept the debate.



First, I will present a rebuttal to Con's first argument, "Standardized Test does not show respect". "Principal Elizabeth Phillips of PS 321 in Park Slope, Brooklyn, and other educators across the state have decried the ELA exams as confusing and developmentally inappropriate." Con decided not to apply to his argument the percentage of educators in New York, or the country, thought that ELA exams are "confusing and developmentally inappropriate." In fact, there has been a survey to parents and grandparents of children of ages 3-18 (randomly selected). The results showed that 66% were in favor of standardized tests and only 28% were not.
Also, Con gave "If the state keeps hiding the exams from public scrutiny, then parents and educators have a right to doubt their pedagogical value." I would like to agree that parents and educators have the right to doubt their pedagogical value, but I would also like to ask Con how many actually do so.
http://educationpost.org...

Next, I will give a rebuttal to Con's second argument, "Standardized testing has swelled and mutated." As far as I understand, tests like the SAT are used for college purposes. Who goes to what college. And also as far as I understand, college is not K-12.

My final rebuttal addresses Con's third argument, "Testing Does Not Measure Up for Americans". "[When] the results are broken out by demographics, two important groups of Americans 'blacks and Hispanics' are somewhat more likely than whites to say that results of standardized tests are very important to improve schools and compare school quality." Irrelevant, as this discussion is about America, a nationality; not Hispanics, Blacks, and Whites, races.


Now I will provide my final argument of this round before I close Round 1 up.
"[Tests] drive schools to focus on getting all students to meet basic proficiency levels and achieve basic skills. The tests provide a measure of accountability for what goes on in the classroom." Simple as that.



Thank you, I look forward to the next round of the debate.
Debate Round No. 1
332059

Con

332059 forfeited this round.
CodeFunny

Pro

CodeFunny forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
332059

Con

332059 forfeited this round.
CodeFunny

Pro

CodeFunny forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
332059

Con

332059 forfeited this round.
CodeFunny

Pro

CodeFunny forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by CodeFunny 10 months ago
CodeFunny
Oops, I forgot to cite my source, I guess I'll fix it in Round 2.
Posted by Zaradi 10 months ago
Zaradi
I would personally work on re-writing your tag lines to better reflect what your cards are actually talking about. Your card selection is decent, but your tag lines say something that's almost entirely different from what your cards are actually talking about.

Moreover you need to actually supplement the evidence you find with analytics to explain the importance of the evidence you find. It's not enough to simply just copy and paste a paragraph from your source and just say "look at my card! I'm right!". Explain why hiding the actual tests from parents hurts the educational value of the tests, explain why the socioeconomic variables in the testing scores makes the testing harmful or not beneficial, and why a lack of people thinking that the tests are important, like, makes the testing less beneficial. The only kind of analysis and impacting to the cards you give is the little "because this evidence says that testing is bad" you give at the bottom, but you never really give me any kind of explanation as to why this is actually true.

With a little more work put into developing your arguments a little more, you could actually have a solid case.
Posted by ObiWan 10 months ago
ObiWan
I'm a tad confused. Your resolution is: On balance Standardized testing is NOT beneficial to K-12 education in the United States and you have taken to con side, which would imply you are arguing for standardised testing being beneficial. However your arguments seem to be against the testing.
I would possibly be interested in debating this either way but I need to clearly know which side you're on.
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