The Instigator
Logical-Master
Con (against)
Winning
65 Points
The Contender
clegdor
Pro (for)
Losing
37 Points

Resolved: There were no time travel plot holes in any of the three "Back to the Future" films.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/13/2008 Category: Entertainment
Updated: 9 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 4,514 times Debate No: 1757
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (18)
Votes (26)

 

Logical-Master

Con

(SKIP THE FIRST PARAGRAPH IF YOU DON'T WANT TO READ THE BACKGROUNG INFO)

1985. It was a a well-renowned year for many. However, it was also a successful year for the entertainment industry as it was the year "Back to the Future" had made its debut. Now this wasn't the first time time travel had been utilized in a film, but it was certainly the first time a "time-travel" plot had produced a block buster. The movie was so successful that it managed to have sequals. Some contest that the sequ3ls weren't that great, whereas others contest that they were. Personally, I was thoroughly entertained by all three films. As implied, it was a great movie, but like many movies, it had its fair share of problems--most notably its time travel plot holes.

In today's debate, the objective of the instigator (myself) will be to prove that there were the "Back to the Future" films contained plot holes. Given the understanding that the term "holes" being plural may bring one to the conclusion that my opponent can show that there were one or zero plot holes, I am willing to allow that. In other words, if my opponent concedes to one of my arguments, it will not be counted against him when it comes to your judgment concerning who won this debate. That said, such a condition would work both ways as that would mean that I was allowed to concede to arguments as I long as I showed that there were two or more plot holes in the series. If there are any questions concerning the conditions, you are free to ask them in the comment section. With that said, onto my case:

#1. How did Jennifer end up on the bench outside of her home at the end of the third film? Through destroying the Almanac in 1955, that alternate 1985 time line was never created. So if that is the case, that would mean that Marty had taken Jennifer back to her home in what is the time line at the end of the movie. That would also mean that Doc had destroyed the time machine. So tell me? Wouldn't that invalidate more than half of BTTF2 as well as all of BTTF3.

#2. Why have Marty go back through time to rescue Doc Brown in 1885? Wasn't Marty aware of the fact that merely warning 1955 Doc Brown of the events that lead to him to being killed in 1885 would easily prevent him from getting trapped back in 1885 in the first place? It sure worked in the first movie.

#3. How were Marty and Doc able to return from 2015? When old Bif came back to 2015, shouldn't Doc Brown have been transported to a psychiatric asylum? Why wasn't everyone rearranged to match up with the changes in the time line?

#4. When old Bif came back to 1955, he was able to use the time machine in the open. How could anyone not have noticed his entrance?

#5. Finally, the granddaddy of them all. At the end of the third movie, Doc says that the reason the fax (which Jennifer had taken in 2015) had vanished is because the future hasn't been decided yet and that it was whatever you wanted it to be. If that is the case, shouldn't all objects taken from the future vanish? In the first film, Marty's photo of him and his siblings should have vanished. The same goes for the rest of the photos which were said to have been taken from the future.

My answer to all five of these observations is that they are plot holes in the films.

With that said, I now stand ready for my opponent's rebuttal.
clegdor

Pro

|-|/-\|_() \/\/ /-\ |) (
This is what i think|\ )

This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. For information on the series as a whole, see Back to the Future trilogy.
Back to the Future

Back to the Future film poster
Directed by Robert Zemeckis
Produced by Bob Gale
Steven Spielberg
Neil Canton
Kathleen Kennedy
Frank Marshall
Johnny Colla (uncredited)
Written by Robert Zemeckis
Bob Gale
Starring Michael J. Fox
Christopher Lloyd
Lea Thompson
Crispin Glover
Thomas F. Wilson
Music by Alan Silvestri
Cinematography Dean Cundey
Editing by Harry Keramidas
Arthur Schmidt
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) July 3, 1985
Running time 116 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget US$ 19,000,000
Followed by Back to the Future Part II
Official website
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile
Back to the Future is a 1985 science fiction–comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and produced by Steven Spielberg. Zemeckis wrote the story, along with Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly and Christopher Lloyd as mad scientist Doctor Emmett L. Brown.

The story's basic plot concerns Marty's accidental traveling back to the year 1955 in a time machine that Doctor Emmet Brown constructed. This causes a number of problems, such as how he will be able to return to 1985, where he came from, when he does not have the necessary plutonium to fuel the journey. He also inadvertently interferes with his parents' first meeting in 1955, and must get them to fall in love before he goes back to 1985.

The film opened on July 3, 1985, and grossed U.S. $210 million at the U.S. box office, making it the highest grossing film of 1985.[1] The film was followed by two sequels, Back to the Future Part II in 1989 and Back to the Future Part III in 1990, forming a trilogy. On December 17, 2002, Universal Studios Home Entertainment released the film on DVD and VHS as part of Back to the Future: The Complete Trilogy.

Due to the film's success, three spin-off projects were made. CBS TV aired an animated series, Back to the Future: The Animated Series and Harvey Comics released a handful of similarly styled comic books, although their stories were original and not merely duplicates of the films. In 1991, Universal Studios Theme Parks opened a simulator ride based on the series called Back to the Future: The Ride. The ride closed on March 30, 2007 in Orlando, FL, and September 3, 2007 in Hollywood, California. The ride remains open at Universal Studios Japan.

Contents [hide]
1 Plot
2 Production
2.1 Script
2.1.1 Pronunciation of "gigawatt"
2.2 Casting and filming
2.3 Music
3 Reaction
3.1 Critics
3.2 Cultural impact
4 Series continuity
5 Home video release history
6 See also
7 References
8 External links

[edit] Plot
Marty McFly (Fox) is a seventeen-year-old living in Hill Valley, California. On the morning of October 25, 1985, his eccentric friend, scientist Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown (Lloyd), calls him, asking to meet at 1:15 a.m. After school that day, a solicitor approaches Marty and his girlfriend Jennifer (Claudia Wells), asking for donations to preserve the town's clock tower which has not run since it was struck by lightning thirty years before. Upon arriving home, Marty finds the family car wrecked in the driveway. Inside the home, he finds his neurotic father George (Crispin Glover) being bullied by his supervisor Biff Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson), who wrecked the borrowed car. At dinner that night, Marty's mother Lorraine (Lea Thompson) recounts how she and George first met when her father hit George with his car.

"Doc" Brown, (Christopher Lloyd) and Marty McFly, (Michael J. Fox) watch as the time machine vanishes.That night, Marty meets the Doc as planned in the parking lot of Twin Pines Mall. Doc presents a De Lorean DMC-12 which he has modified into a time machine. As Marty videotapes, Doc then explains that the car travels to a programmed date and time upon reaching eighty-eight miles per hour using plutonium in a nuclear reaction to generate the 1.21 gigawatts of power it requires. Demonstrating how to program the machine, Doc enters in November 5, 1955 as the target date, explaining that it was the day he conceived the idea of the flux capacitor; the device which "makes time travel possible." Before Doc can depart for his planned trip twenty-five years into the future, a pair of Libyan terrorists, from whom he stole the plutonium, arrive in a Volkswagen van and ruthlessly gun him down. Marty jumps in the De Lorean and is pursued by the Libyans until he hits eighty-eight miles per hour and is instantaneously transported to 1955.

The car stalls shortly after his arrival, so Marty hides it and makes his way into town, finding that the town square now reflects the popular culture of the 1950s. He runs into his own father, then a teenager, being tyrannized just as he was in 1985 by Biff, then the school bully. Marty follows George, and as he is about to be hit by Lorraine's father's car, Marty saves his father by taking the hit himself resulting in Lorraine becoming infatuated with Marty instead of George. Marty is disturbed by her sexual advances which contrast her prudish attitude in 1985. He leaves to track down the Doc of thirty years ago. After managing to convince the scientist that he is from the future, Doc learns of the power requirements of the De Lorean from Marty's videotape. He tells Marty that aside from plutonium, which is unobtainable, the only possible source of that much power is a bolt of lightning, which is unpredictable. Marty realizes that the lighting strike at the clock tower will occur the following Saturday, and Doc concocts a way to harness the bolt's power.

However, Doc deduces that Marty has prevented his parents from meeting. Since Marty will not exist unless his parents fall in love, he finds that Marty is in danger of being erased from time. After several failed attempts at playing matchmaker, Marty eventually works out a plan to have George appear to rescue Lorraine from his own advances on the night of a school dance. When Biff shows up unexpectedly and attacks Lorraine, George manages to defend her for real, knocking Biff out with a single punch. Lorraine and George return to the dance together where they kiss for the first time, ensuring Marty's existence. Doc, meanwhile, has used cables to connect the clock tower's antenna to two lamp posts, which he plans to have Marty drive under in the De Lorean, now sporting a lightning rod, at eighty-eight miles per hour the moment the lightning strikes.

The clock tower gets struck by lightning at 10:04 P.M. on November 12, 1955Before Marty can leave, Doc finds a letter in his coat pocket that Marty had written, warning him about his future assassination. Doc rips up the letter without reading it, knowing the dangers of learning about the future. Marty adjusts the time machine to take him back to 1985 ten minutes earlier than he left, giving him time to prevent the shooting. Upon his arrival, however, the car stalls and Marty arrives at the mall too late to save the Doc. When the coast is clear, Marty runs to Doc's body and finds him alive. Doc unzips his radiation suit to reveal a bulletproof vest, and shows Marty the letter he had written in 1955, taped back together.

The next morning, Marty finds his family has been changed for the better. Most notably, Lorraine is no longer prudish, and George has become self-confident, ordering around Biff, who is no longer his boss, though he seems to be a bit more lenient with him. Just as Jennifer and Marty reunite, Doc arrives from the year 2015, appearing frantic about a problem with the couple's future children. Marty and Jennifer climb aboard the De Lorean and, aided by the technology of thirty years hence, the car lifts off into the sky.

[edit] Production

[edit] Script
The ins
Debate Round No. 1
Logical-Master

Con

My opponent's copy/paste from IMDB was rather "interesting", but if you'll notice, it's mostly just a brief overview of the first film and has nothing to do with the matter of plotholes (much less my arguments which address plot holes). Therefore, I extend all of my arguments while affirming that the back to the future films contained plot holes.
clegdor

Pro

Plot
Taking up where the previous film left off, Marty McFly, "Doc" Brown and Jennifer Parker arrive in 2015. Doc tranquilizes Jennifer, who is not necessary for his plan, explaining that he brought her along only because she saw the time machine. Doc explains that Marty's son is about to be approached by Griff Tannen, Biff's grandson, and his gang, who will ask him to take part in a robbery. According to Doc, this event leads to the ruin of the entire McFly family. Marty impersonates his future son and tells Griff he will not join the robbery, leading to a hoverboard chase that damages the nearby courthouse. Griff and his gang are arrested and the planned robbery never occurs.

Before meeting up with Doc, Marty notices a sports almanac in a store window which lists sports statistics through the year 2000. Imagining the potential for financial gain in 1985, Marty buys the book. Doc discovers the almanac and throws it away, chiding Marty for his plan. Meanwhile, Jennifer, still tranquilized, is found by the police, mistaken for her future self after thumbprint identification, and taken to her future home. Hiding in a closet, she witnesses the Marty of 2015 being fired from his job he is caught in an illegal scheme that his colleague, Douglas J. Needles, goaded him into joining. Doc finds Jennifer and sneaks her out of the house.

Biff's casino hotel in 1985A.While Doc is rescuing Jennifer, the old-aged Biff of 2015 recovers the discarded sports almanac and steals the De Lorean. He returns the car to 2015 just as Marty and Doc prepare to leave for their own time. Upon arrival in 1985, Marty and Doc find that Hill Valley has become a dilapidated, crime-ridden slum lorded over by a middle-aged Biff, who is now immeasurably rich and powerful thanks to decades of successful sports betting. He has also married Marty's widowed mother, Lorraine, after secretly killing her husband George. Doc deduces that the Biff of 2015 must have given the almanac to his younger self sometime in the past. Marty confronts Biff and finds out that he received the almanac on November 12, 1955, the date on which the climax of the previous film took place.

Marty and Doc travel back to 1955 to prevent Biff from getting the almanac. Marty eventually manages to steal the book from the 1955 Biff and burns it, restoring history to its proper course. As Doc attempts to land the De Lorean to pick Marty up, the car is struck by lightning, causing it to disappear. A few seconds later a Western Union delivery man appears with a letter, which he explains was sent seventy years ago with the explicit instructions that it be delivered to Marty "at this exact location, at this exact minute, November 12, 1955." Marty tears open the letter, which is from Doc, explaining that he is now trapped in 1885. Marty runs to the clock tower to find the Doc of 1955, just as lighting strikes as depicted in Part I. Seeing Marty, who he has just sent back to 1985, Doc faints to a cliffhanger of "to be concluded..." appearing onscreen.

This is followed by a teaser trailer to Back to the Future Part III before the credits.

[edit] Cast
Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly Sr., Marty McFly Jr. and Marlene McFly
Christopher Lloyd as Dr. Emmett L. Brown (aka Doc Brown)
Lea Thompson as Lorraine Baines (McFly/Tannen)
Thomas F. Wilson as Biff Tannen and Griff Tannen
Elisabeth Shue as Jennifer Parker (McFly)
James Tolkan as Mr. Strickland
Jeffrey Weissman and Crispin Glover (BTTF1 footage) as George McFly
Billy Zane as Match
Casey Siemaszko as 3-D
J.J. Cohen as Skinhead
The characters of George McFly and Jennifer Parker were played by actors different from those of the original film, requiring that some previous scenes be reshot.

[edit] Production
The original script for Back to the Future Part II had Marty and Doc Brown go back to 1967 instead of 1955, had Mr. Fusion destroyed, with Marty and Doc Brown having to fly the De Lorean over the Grand Canyon.

[edit] Replacement of Crispin Glover
As Bob Gale states in the DVD commentary, actor Crispin Glover was asked to reprise the role of George McFly in this film. Glover indicated interest, but demanded a salary the producers felt was unreasonable. Glover reportedly refused to budge, so he was dropped from the picture. Glover later insisted in a 1992 interview on The Howard Stern Show that he and Zemeckis had had some "creative disagreements" over the character, and felt that the director simply wanted an actor who was more pliable. He also said that the salary offered was "really low" (reportedly around $50,000), and that he was certain they never really wanted him back.[citation needed]

In the BTTF FAQ, Gale and Zemeckis state that Glover was uninterested in doing the sequels and was asking for the same salary as Michael J. Fox, and therefore was written out of the story.[1]

As a result, the filmmakers found inventive ways of avoiding showing the character's face in the movie, despite the fact that George McFly was in certain key scenes and dialog. During all scenes in which the George McFly character appears in both this film and Back to the Future Part III, he is played by Jeffrey Weissman and seen wearing sunglasses, from the back, upside-down, or out of focus in the background. This was to prevent audiences from realizing that George McFly was played by a different actor. However, producers also recycled unused footage from the original Back to the Future that included Crispin Glover's portrayal of George McFly. Glover sued Universal for compensation, on grounds that his contract for the first film did not allow subsequent uses of his portrayal of George McFly in new films. The day before the lawsuit went before a judge, Universal quietly settled the case, paying the actor an undisclosed sum. Glover would not reveal the amount during his Howard Stern Show appearance, but did suggest the real reason for the settlement was that Universal was reluctant to "open up their accounting books to the public" during the trial. The Screen Actors Guild later rewrote their rules regarding the derivative use of actors' works in films or TV series, requiring the studios and networks to give appropriate payment and credit to the actors.

[edit] Replacement of Claudia Wells

Claudia Wells' scene at the end of Back to the Future (top) was reshot with Elisabeth Shue for the beginning of Back to the Future Part II (bottom).Claudia Wells, who had played Marty McFly's girlfriend Jennifer Parker in the original Back to the Future, reportedly had personal problems and opted to drop out of acting in 1987.[citation needed] The producers reluctantly cast Elisabeth Shue for the part, which required reshooting the closing scenes of Back to the Future for the beginning of Back to the Future Part II. A comparison of both films reveals that Shue appears to be considerably older than Wells (and slightly taller than Michael J. Fox).

It was more than a decade before Claudia Wells returned to Hollywood, with a starring role in the 1996 independent film Still Waters Burn. She is one of the few actors not to make an appearance during the 2002 "behind the scenes" documentaries on the Back to the Future trilogy documentaries on DVD.

[edit] Rumors and urban legends

Marty, wearing self-fitting sneakers, riding a Hoverboard in 2015As a joke, Director Robert Zemeckis said during an interview that the hoverboards (flying skateboards) used in the movie were real. A surprising number of people thought he was telling the truth and demanded them at toy stores. After the release of Part III, Zemeckis had the opportunity to explain in another interview that all of the flying scenes were accomplished by a variety of special effects techniques. There was even a high demand for the Nike Sportshoes Marty wears with automatic shoe-laces, which fans thought to be real.

After the Florida Marlins beat the Cleveland Indians in the 1997 World Series, and
Debate Round No. 2
Logical-Master

Con

Again, my opponent list an overview of one of the films as well as few other irrelevant tib bits of information, but doesn't address the issue of plot holes. So like I said earlier, extend my arguments.
clegdor

Pro

There cant be plot holes in this because time travel is a neverending conundrum of just random theroys, since there is no such thing as it, there can be no plot holes......Ron Paul R[evol]ution !!!!

Time travel is the concept of moving backwards and/or forwards to different points in time, in a manner analogous to moving through space. Additionally, some interpretations of time travel suggest the possibility of travel between parallel realities or universes.[1] Although time travel has been a common plot device in fiction since the 19th century, and one-way travel into the future is arguably possible given the phenomenon of time dilation in the theory of relativity, it is currently unknown whether the laws of physics would allow backwards time travel. Any technological device, whether fictional or hypothetical, that is used to achieve two-way time travel is known as a time machine.

Contents [hide]
1 Origins of the concept
2 Time travel in theory
2.1 Tourism in time
2.2 General relativity
3 The "presentist" view
4 Time travel to the past in physics
4.1 The equivalence of time travel and faster-than-light travel
4.2 Special spacetime geometries
4.3 Using wormholes
4.4 Other approaches based on general relativity
4.5 Time travel and the anthropic principle
4.6 Experiments carried out
4.6.1 Non-physics based experiments
5 Time travel to the future in physics
5.1 Time dilation
5.2 Time perception
6 Other ideas about time travel from mainstream physics
6.1 The possibility of paradoxes
6.2 Using quantum entanglement
7 Ideas from fiction
7.1 Types of time travel
7.1.1 Immutable timelines
7.1.2 Mutable timelines
7.2 Gradual and instantaneous
7.3 Time travel, or space-time travel?
8 See also
8.1 Speculations
8.2 Claims of time travel
8.3 Fiction, humor
9 References
10 Further reading
11 External links

[edit] Origins of the concept
There is no widespread agreement as to which written work should be recognized as the earliest example of a time travel story, since a number of early works feature elements ambiguously suggestive of time travel. For example, Memoirs of the Twentieth Century (1733) by Samuel Madden is mainly a series of letters from English ambassadors in various countries to the British "Lord High Treasurer", along with a few replies from the British Foreign Office, all purportedly written in 1997 and 1998 and describing the conditions of that era.[2] However, the framing story is that these letters were actual documents given to the narrator by his guardian angel one night in 1728; for this reason, Paul Alkon suggests in his book Origins of Futuristic Fiction that "the first time-traveler in English literature is a guardian angel who returns with state documents from 1998 to the year 1728",[3] although the book does not explicitly show how the angel obtained these documents. Alkon later qualifies this by writing "It would be stretching our generosity to praise Madden for being the first to show a traveler arriving from the future", but also says that Madden "deserves recognition as the first to toy with the rich idea of time-travel in the form of an artifact sent backwards from the future to be discovered in the present."[2]

Louis-S�bastien Mercier's L'An 2440, r�ve s'il en fut jamais ("The Year 2440: A Dream If Ever There Was One") is a utopian novel set in the year 2440. An extremely popular work (it went through twenty-five editions after its first appearance in 1771), the work describes the adventures of an unnamed man, who, after engaging in a heated discussion with a philosopher friend about the injustices of Paris, falls asleep and finds himself in a Paris of the future. Robert Darnton writes that "despite its self-proclaimed character of fantasy...L'An 2440 demanded to be read as a serious guidebook to the future." [Robert Darnton, The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France (New York: W.W. Norton, 1996), 120.]

In the science fiction anthology Far Boundaries (1951), the editor August Derleth identifies the short story "Missing One's Coach: An Anachronism", written for the Dublin Literary Magazine by an anonymous author in 1838, as a very early time travel story.[4] In this story, the narrator is waiting under a tree to be picked up by a coach which will take him out of Newcastle, when he suddenly finds himself transported back over a thousand years, where he encounters the Venerable Bede in a monastery, and gives him somewhat ironic explanations of the developments of the coming centuries. It is never entirely clear whether these events actually occurred or were merely a dream — the narrator says that when he initially found a comfortable-looking spot in the roots of the tree, he sat down, "and as my sceptical reader will tell me, nodded and slept", but then says that he is "resolved not to admit" this explanation. A number of dreamlike elements of the story may suggest otherwise to the reader, such as the fact that none of the members of the monastery seem to be able to see him at first, and the abrupt ending where Bede has been delayed talking to the narrator and so the other monks burst in thinking that some harm has come to him, and suddenly the narrator finds himself back under the tree in the present (August of 1837), with his coach having just passed his spot on the road, leaving him stranded in Newcastle for another night.[5]

Charles Dickens' 1843 book A Christmas Carol is considered by some[6] to be one of the first depictions of time travel, as the main character, Ebenezer Scrooge, is transported to Christmases past, present and yet to come. These might be considered mere visions rather than actual time travel, though, since Scrooge only viewed each time period passively, unable to interact with them.

A clearer example of time travel is found in the popular 1861 book Paris avant les hommes (Paris before Men), published posthumously by the French botanist and geologist Pierre Boitard. In this story the main character is transported into the prehistoric past by the magic of a "lame demon" (a French pun on Boitard's name), where he encounters such extinct animals as a Plesiosaur, as well as Boitard's imagined version of an apelike human ancestor, and is able to actively interact with some of them.[7] Another clear early example of time travel in fiction is the short story The Clock That Went BackwardPDF (35.7 KiB) by Edward Page Mitchell, which appeared in the New York Sun in 1881. Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), in which the protagonist finds himself in the time of King Arthur after a fight in which he is hit with a sledge hammer, was another early time travel story which helped bring the concept to a wide audience, and was also one of the first stories to show history being changed by the time traveler's actions.

The first time travel story to feature time travel by means of a time machine was Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau's 1887 book El Anacron�pete.[8] This idea gained popularity with the H. G. Wells story The Time Machine, published in 1895 (preceded by a less influential story of time travel Wells wrote in 1888, titled The Chronic Argonauts), which also featured a time machine and which is often seen as an inspiration for all later science fiction stories featuring time travel.

Since that time, both science and fiction (see Time travel in fiction) have expanded on the concept of time travel, but whether it could be possible in reality is still an open question.

[edit] Time travel in theory
Some theories, most notably special and general relativity, suggest that suitable geometries of spacetime, or specific types of motion in space, might allow time travel into the past and future if these geometries or motions are possible.[9] In technical papers physicists generally avoid the commonplace language of "moving" or "traveling" through time ('movement' normally refers only to a change in s
Debate Round No. 3
18 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by beem0r 9 years ago
beem0r
I don't even want to ask if that was sarcastic.
Posted by diaxheart 9 years ago
diaxheart
AMAZING debate, my favorite on this site so far by a lot haha. Better than many others, actually has good ground on both sides of the debate and its not something about personal taste like Jelly VS Jam debates. Hahaha, good job, great resolution. I look forward to seeing more from you two!
Posted by Miserlou 9 years ago
Miserlou
Yeah, even clegdor thinks he shouldn't win... I guess people are just looking at length and just thinking that that counts for someone.
Posted by clegdor 9 years ago
clegdor
wtf how was i winning? this is messed up
Posted by Mr.Cactuar 9 years ago
Mr.Cactuar
How is pro winning? All he did was jsut copy and paste and not prove a single thing!
Posted by beem0r 9 years ago
beem0r
LOL @ THE VOTES, LOL.

That's just sad. This is why long debates are always epic fail here.

You'll probably eventually come out in the lead though. Hopefully.
Posted by Logical-Master 9 years ago
Logical-Master
Wow, whoever said the voters don't actually read the arguments is right on the money. lol! I think I'm going to make a debate concerning the voting system in the near future.

This is the comment section and not part of my argument, but since I see no rule against commenting on my own debate, I think I'll do so.

Clegdor loses on two counts.

#1. He doesn't even address the matter of time travel plot holes until his last round (where I am unable to respond). This is considered abuse. I could ALMOST see if I had just made this a one round debate, but it was 3 rounds, and clegdor did nothing but show his copy/past from imdb (which incidentally, his material in round 3 is copy/paste) until I was unable to respond.

#2. His final response doesn't address the plot holes I stated were in the film.

In fact, there is a huge problem with his initial argument.

Clegdor: Time Travel is merely theoretical and doesn't exist, therefore, there can be no plot holes in the film back to the future.

This is non sequitur. Not only that, but we are discussing a FICTIONAL movie. According to his logic, there can be no plot holes in any fictional movie that uses themes which don't exist in the real world. There's another problem with this, but I don't have the time or patience to deeply get into the absurdity of this logic.

As for the rest of the post, it merely addresses time travel theories which clegdor copy/pasted from another site.

Once again, I am rather disappointed in the voters of this website, but since this is just a website (not like I winning any money, getting into Harvard, or increasing my chances of becoming president), I think I'll be able to live with this and brush it off with a good laugh.

I just hope voters don't continue voting on who posts the most text as that completely defeats the purpose of the system in the first place. Remember, it's quality not quantity.
Posted by Logical-Master 9 years ago
Logical-Master
Rockband: I beg to differ as I've actually argued this before. I think the problem is that there aren't really any people here who have seen the movie recently and/or have pondered on this particular subject.

Miserlou: lol! I used to do that myself.

Yraelz: This briefly outlines it:

http://en.wikipedia.org...
Posted by Yraelz 9 years ago
Yraelz
Haven't read enough about Socrates to know much about his method. I'm pretty sure I frown on how he used it, but not how he said he used it.

I may have to try it.
Posted by Miserlou 9 years ago
Miserlou
Logical-Master: Not personally, but it was one of my friend's favorites for a while and he'd always say "objection!" in that voice whenever the situation called for it (or didn't).
26 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Vote Placed by Tatarize 8 years ago
Tatarize
Logical-MasterclegdorTied
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Vote Placed by Logical-Master 8 years ago
Logical-Master
Logical-MasterclegdorTied
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Vote Placed by JBlake 8 years ago
JBlake
Logical-MasterclegdorTied
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Vote Placed by s0m31john 8 years ago
s0m31john
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Vote Placed by Robert_Santurri 8 years ago
Robert_Santurri
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Vote Placed by scarrig 8 years ago
scarrig
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Vote Placed by necromancer 8 years ago
necromancer
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Vote Placed by Jamcke 9 years ago
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Vote Placed by eyeleapy 9 years ago
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Vote Placed by mattresses 9 years ago
mattresses
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