The Instigator
Oliop
Pro (for)
Winning
1 Points
The Contender
carriead20
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

School should start later.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
Oliop
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/3/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 836 times Debate No: 66271
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (2)

 

Oliop

Pro

There is actually a good argument for this. If school starts even one hour later, children would have more sleep and therefore would be more awake in class, and being awake will improve concentration.

Let me just state the one rule: NO DUMB*SSES.
carriead20

Con

I accept the challenge and look forward to debating you.
Debate Round No. 1
Oliop

Pro

As I said in my original argument, if school starts earlier then the children get more sleep, and therefore are more alert and they concentrate more.
carriead20

Con

As far as Con's arguments I can refute them with one solution. If students are feeling tired all they need to do is go to bed earlier.

Back over to you Con.
Debate Round No. 2
Oliop

Pro

Yes, but even then, they may not be able to go to sleep until their normal time because of the sleep cycle. If school started later then they would actually get more sleep than if they went to bed earlier.
carriead20

Con

My opponent has just agreed with my arguments.

1. Transportation

Because most school districts have a delicately balanced bus transportation system designed to run as efficiently and inexpensively as possible, any change in the school schedule can have a severe impact. The specific circumstances in each district vary, but problems that arise can include cost, recruiting drivers, and/or redesigning the routes.

One solution that has worked to solve this problem is flipping start times, most commonly elementary with high school. This solution requires no extra buses or drivers, just a change in the order of pickups. This schedule also seems to be more appropriate to elementary school students’ sleep schedules, because young children tend to wake up earlier in the morning. This is a very dicey issue; however, in districts where the start time is quite early. If the young students have to go to school so early, they have to go to bed VERY early (because they need 10 - 11 hours of sleep). Parents may not get home from work until very near or after bedtime. The direct flip cannot work unless all start times are reasonable.

Another solution that may be implemented is a shift to public transportation for older students. In many cases, the public bus routes are similar to yellow bus routes, and can be used by students. Many districts have found they can actually save money by buying students bus passes and eliminating a large portion of their yellow bus fleet.

2. After School Activities

High school athletics are very important to many students who have obvious concerns about the impact of a change in start times on their ability to participate. Any delay in the start of school will most likely result in

a later release time, which may reduce time available for practice and matches (especially daylight hours). One result of later release times may be greater competition for field and gym space, which may result in the cancellation of some programs (JV and sports like swimming and golf, for example, which often require the use of facilities during off-peak hours). If school gets out later, some athletes might be required to leave class early in order to attend a match. In this case, students may have to choose between a game and a test, a choice no student should have to make.

Despite all these concerns, most districts that have changed their start time have experienced few problems with regard to athletics. Practice times are rescheduled, and in some cases lights are installed so practice can run a little later. Match times are changed so that students do not have to leave class early. Many districts have even seen increased participation in sports (Edina, MN) and improved performance by their teams (Wilton, CT; Nathan Hale, Seattle, WA). Research has shown that sleep deprivation has a severe negative impact on coordination and endurance, so it makes sense that better rested student athletes would perform better.

Also, while athletics are obviously very important to many students and their families, everyone must remember that a school’s first obligation is to provide its students with an environment conducive to learning.

The delay in release time for students also means that students with after-school jobs may be affected. This issue is important for certain students and their families who rely on the extra income to get by. Therefore, the change may disproportionately affect low income families. On the other hand, studies have shown that employers indicate a change in start times has not affected their business or the number of hours their student employees can work. They indicate that extra help is not usually needed until school gets out anyway, so they can easily adjust to the new schedule.

(1) http://www.abc.net.au...
(2) http://wtkr.com...;

Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by ShadowHawk555 2 years ago
ShadowHawk555
I agree but the main problem is school times are set early so a parent can drop off their kids on the way to work
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by 9spaceking 2 years ago
9spaceking
Oliopcarriead20Tied
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Total points awarded:10 
Reasons for voting decision: conduct to pro because of con's final round Blitzkrieg. Only counting the previous rounds, it is unsure who wins, because although con's plan seems available, pro refutes it--but not stressing enough on the supposed "sleep cycle" (I know this is true but he doesn't use anything to support this). Thus, I null-vote on the arguments.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 2 years ago
Ragnar
Oliopcarriead20Tied
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: This is a good example of a Final Round Blitzkrieg (URL at bottom). "As a general rule, the final round is not the time for epiphanies. As a voter, if the final round does not feel like a natural extension of the prior debate, dismiss it. The most blatant of these abuses is the contender not making a case until the final round, at which point the instigator cannot respond." Note that while I dislike the conduct of that final round (accidental or not), my solution of discounting it in whole means conduct remains unaffected. I suggest a rematch, to get that final round earlier into the debate when it could be responded to, and in essence springboard a debate instead of a couple minor opinions each round. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B2zJX6-A0NNwQguIoWrM9HDoB_nbGhi7NIhYZ2v68Q4/edit#heading=h.fqhyjzd2wxfi