The Instigator
BlueOrangutan
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Kelisitaan
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Schools should always try to mimic the challenges adults face in daily life.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/24/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 416 times Debate No: 98394
Debate Rounds (5)
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BlueOrangutan

Pro

My argument is that the education sector should always be analysing modern living and be altering the curriculum to simulate the challenges adults face day to day in such a way as to provide good learning experiences and prepare the younger generation for world they will soon be entering.
Kelisitaan

Con

Although I agree that schools should try to mimic the challenge that adults face in daily life, the problem is the word "ALWAYS."

Furthermore, since school is not the only thing one can learn from, it is unnecessary to make it ALWAYS mimic the challenges adult face in daily life.

One main problem for people in school is "burn out" or lack of interest. If school has nothing interesting, e.g. art for an art student, gym for fun, etc., then a student will be more likely to burn out. It is important that there are fun activities in school as well that do not mimic daily life problems in order to keep a kid interested.
Debate Round No. 1
BlueOrangutan

Pro

I appreciate you highlighting the 'always' in my statement and agree with you to the greater extent regarding the "burn out" effect. I think my poor wording has not conveyed my meaning. I do not intend for school to ever be uninteresting and it is my feeling that most people learn better when they are enjoying what they are doing. With that in mind my thinking would be to base lessons around the challenges we face when we come across any roadblocks to success. For example, a common problem in adult life could be financial planning. My intention is not to hand children a profit and loss spreadsheet, instead construct a task or activity that simulates a similar or parallel difficulty (here I am thinking maybe enhanced version of the game of life) to help build a basic understanding of core concepts.

In regards to the arts, they are a vital (in my opinion) part of life and yet the tasks given can still reflect the challenges to be faced. For example I love to make sculptures and stop-motion animations and feel alive when I am being creative but I often find myself either uninspired or demotivated by the day to day hum-drum. This is a challenge i face, so could an art teacher show me how to engender and nurture inspiration and creativity?

I agree that school is not the only place of learning in life but for many (particularly those facing difficulty perhaps due to poverty or hardship) it can be the only organised and resource rich environment they encounter and this is why it should always provide the best balance of educational experience (in nutrition, finance, e.t.c). This could even be done through art, using my previous example I may construct a lesson like this: "Can you construct a piece of artwork of your choosing that will help educate people on the subject of healthy eating? your challenge is to take this exhausted topic matter and make something people will pay attention to." If I were given this task I could take my love of stop-motion and make a short film whilst also learning about nutrition. I don't remember doing anything like that at school and feel that it may have benefited me. Instead I remember distinctly being given the task of "Design a website to sell sandwiches to order." This task followed a booklet of instructions and had little creativity within it and a level of hand holding that that I have rarely experienced in my adult life.

With your comments taken into account let me amend my statement.

"The over arching aim of educators should be to prepare children for any of they challenges they may face in their futures."

In my mind this includes any financial hardship, health, social and creative issues.

Thoughts? (apologies for being so wordy)
Kelisitaan

Con

"The over arching aim of educators should be to prepare children for any of they challenges they may face in their futures."

There you go, that statement I agree with. However, the problem is, that's not what you originally stated. You are goal post shifting now, but it seems that you agree with that.
Debate Round No. 2
BlueOrangutan

Pro

I absolutely am goal post shifting, its why I like this site as a learning experience. Next time my arguments will be better thought out and worded ;)

Thanks for the input.
Kelisitaan

Con

Agreed, you are definitely one of the smart ones. It takes a VERY smart person to figure out quickly when he is wrong and to adapt and become smarter. That already makes you smarter than 99% of people.

I will say, however, that I read your statement too quickly. (I wish there were an edit button but there isn't.)

"The over arching aim of educators should be to prepare children for any of they challenges they may face in their futures."

I don't agree with the word "any." Same concept as not agreeing with the word "always" in your previous statements. I think changing "any" to "most" or "the vast majority" would be a far superior argument.

Best of luck.
Debate Round No. 3
BlueOrangutan

Pro

I guess, as with many discussions like this, the aim of it will inevitably shift. My questions to you then is what challenges do we face that couldn't be prepared for in some productive way in the school setting? Where in the school day are such concepts that these challenges highlight not appropriate?

This is something I have discussed with many people as I do feel that school should give you all (I know there I go again with all/any/always) the tools necessary to be happy and/or productive human.

I guess the goal shifts again and I apologise again... perhaps I should find a discuss.org...
Kelisitaan

Con

The point is, you can't expect school to prepare you for everything in life; some things really just need to be experienced in order to be learned. For example, can school prepare you on how to deal with losing a loved one?

Moreover, school isn't the only educational tool, and it only goes until one is 18 years old (high school that is). Learning doesn't stop when school stops; therefore, it's unnecessary for school to have to teach you everything, especially when it's a much better idea to focus on teaching you the stuff it needs to teach you well.
Debate Round No. 4
BlueOrangutan

Pro

This is where our arguments differ then. I see school as a good place to prepare for such experiences. Obviously nothing can truly prepare you for a loss like that but that is not to say that learning through discussion cannot have a hugely positive effect. Another example: when I was at child and lost a grandparent with whom I was very close, I was lucky to have a strong and loving support network to help guide me through it. Had I not such support the experience could have been considerably worse. To prepare children for this I think death is an important discussion and school an ideal place in which to have it. Hearing other people's understandings of such an immensely confusing and unknown aspect of life and the realisation that you are not the only person who has no idea what to think can be hugely beneficial.

How could this be done? It already is to some extent within religious studies, although the discussion here would benefit leaning a little more as to why such beliefs in the afterlife are held (this is a tentative subject to approach but when you do I have found in my personal experience that the discussions are engaging and enjoyable). Art can obviously be used to explore this as can literature and media. Great honest explorations of death in my youth were the Harry Potter series and, even younger, the tales of Redwall by Brian Jacques. By staying mindful of these aspects of life we can far better improve the chances of many individuals when they are faced by these challenges out in the real world.

I agree that learning never stops, but to me it is not a stepping stone process, it infinitely expands and deepens in all directions as you pass through life and shared learning is an great place to dip our toes into the water for the first time, supported by both the experienced and our young peers. This to me is the stuff that school needs to teach you well and can be a foundation upon which literacy and numeracy can be engagingly built.

I suppose to close my side of this discussion i see it as follows; in a world in which we seem to be increasingly leaning on the established structures of state and industry (healthcare, infrastructure) and away from the support of close-knit community, education must strive to evolve to prepare the young in whichever way they require for their future.

In its most simple form I see it like this:

Child 1 has wholesome healthy meals made by parents every night. Child 2 is not so lucky, one parent has left and the other is struggling for both time and money so Child 2's nutrition is poor. Child 2 grows up with health issues (obesity, diabetes, depression). In society what are the only common denominators here? Both children and entitled to and required to have an education. Can we justify saying "Well Child 1 learnt about nutrition at home so there is no reason Child 2 couldn't have." I know I don't feel comfortable with that.

Thanks for your input and keen eye for detail, I have thoroughly enjoyed the discussion and hope you did too!

Peace and good luck!
Kelisitaan

Con

The problem is, there are many problems that people face; it is unrealistic for school to be able to prepare you for all of them. You should be spending your entire life learning, not just until 18, so concepts that occur later in life, e.g. taking care of a child, should be taught then as well.

Use school to focus on more important problems/harder concepts/to explain the problems that it does teach in depth. I do agree that nutrition is vastly underrated and should probably be taught in school; however, certain things, such as how to deal with death of a loved one, childbirth, how to ask a girl out on a date, etc., can be taught in other places and through other means.

You have limited time in school; if you try to teach everything, then you won't go in depth on anything either.
Debate Round No. 5
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