The Instigator
thedoctor13
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Beagle_hugs
Con (against)
Winning
14 Points

Schools should be co-ed

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
Beagle_hugs
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/16/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,651 times Debate No: 67149
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (3)

 

thedoctor13

Pro

Round one: opening statement and main argument
Round 2: rebuttals
Round 3: conclusion

I do not care how experienced or old you may be i would like a clean polite arguement.

Although it may seem contrary to popular belief, co-ed schools are much better than schools with separated girls and boys. Co-ed schools prepare students for real life. In single sex schools the students may be left out of important teaching methods, and they may not develop needed social cues. Students will see the opposite gender out of school and it will be socially awkward. The students do not learn the social skills needed for the real world, that is dealing with the opposite gender. Long story short, co-ed schools are much more productive, and beneficial than single sex schools.
Co-ed schools are better than single-sex schools because in single sex school the students might feel left out. Imagine a sensitive boy who just messed up a problem, and the teacher starts yelling and getting up in his face. Of course, that is what the teacher thinks that is the good method of teaching a group of boys. The same thing goes for a hardcore girl in an all girls school. It can be clearly seen, that there are detrimental flaws to single-sex schooling.
When students are put through single-sex schooling they do not learn any of the social cues that students learn in co-ed schools. In real life, students need to know how to have friends that aren't the same gender. If they don't, they would be extremely awkward which would make the student sad. Also it is proven that boys work better when girls are near. If 3-7 years of contact with the opposite gender are eliminated, the students will have a lot of catching up to do
I know that test scores are higher in single-sex schools. Even if the test scores are higher, you are not going to get a job when you are older because you can't do well in the interview because you are socially awkward in the interview.Co-ed schools also promote equality. Single-sex schools are promoting gender stereotyping. Students that go to single-sex schools end up doing much worse in the real world than student that go to co-ed schools.
It has now been clearly stated that Co-ed students end up doing better long term that single-sex educated students. There are flaws with single-sex schools like, students not learning
social cues, the fact that not all students fit the stereotypical method of teaching one gender, and that single-sex schools promote gender stereotyping. Create a better generation of children make sure that kids go to co-ed schools.
Beagle_hugs

Con

I will assume that "co-ed" schools do not include gender-segregated schools where both genders attend.
I will assume that a "co-ed" school could have a teacher or professor of any gender.
I will assume that the Pro is asserting that co-ed schooling should be chosen in every society that exists today.
I will assume that the question is personal and individual as well as societal.

I.

As the Pro concedes, gender-segregated classrooms result in higher test scores. It must be acknowledged that the educational advantages of gender segregation is a hotly contested topic, with claims to fact on both sides of the issue. Within that debate, it should be sufficient to note that there is a significant ideological element. Ideologies are not susceptible to evidence; they are generally pseudo-scientific in that their adherents simply shop for information that confirms their ideological biases. One cannot ignore the powerful ideological drive to plug evidence into the story that gender segregation is damaging or that gender segregation is helpful.

I believe this state of affairs advises against a universal conclusion and that, on a social level, it is important that localities be able to experiment and more fully develop an answer to this question.

Also, the evidence that individuals who have certain characteristics may benefit from gender-segregated schooling (see GAO studies) is enough for me to conclude that, on an individual basis, there are times when gender-segregated schooling may be appropriate.

I believe that, for the "person" who has motives and acts with intent, it is very straightforward that some schools may be gender-segregated. If there is a social or individual reason for gender-segregated schools to exist, then a personal motivation to attend such a school, especially in a society where the decision of a few such people does not greatly alter the prevailing co-ed approach, should not be written off as incorrect. The person's freedom to choose is what is "correct."

II.

I believe that it is inevitable that Islamic and similar cultures will progress toward gender equality. The question of co-ed or gender-segregated education does not need to consider whether co-ed education would accelerate equality. What I am most concerned with is the plight of girls and women in societies where they might not have a education (or might have less of it) except through gender segregation, such as Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, etc. Some cultures are exploring gender segregation to address violence against women as educational access expands. Correct or not, this is experimentation towards equality. Furthermore, the result of education today may be to undermine inequality and may have a greater effect than opposition to gender segregation today.

Conclusion.

I believe that it is important to allow for experimentation, individual differences, personal choice, and pragmatism--accordingly, I conclude that gender segregation of schools is sometimes permissible.
Debate Round No. 1
thedoctor13

Pro

thedoctor13 forfeited this round.
Beagle_hugs

Con

So, although my opponent has forfeited this round, I will post a brief rebuttal:

1. Pro concludes that harsh teachers might make students feel left out. I'm not sure what the connection with gender is, though, since the Pro proposes that this condition could exist in either an all-male or an all-female school. It's possible that the Pro meant to argue that it's wrong to assume that all boys or all girls benefit from the same learning style as the rest of their gender. While that may be true, it doesn't demonstrate anything about whether a co-ed classroom is preferable, because that just means there are potentially more individuals with different learning styles all in the same room. This might exacerbate the consequences of having a one-dimensional approach to teaching, but Pro hasn't offered any reason why it would help resolve that problem.

2. Pro claims that without co-ed schooling, students cannot learn ANY social cues. However, it's unclear why that is true, except with regard to gender-interactions, and it's further unclear why there would be no other contexts in which students learned gender-related social cues. Similarly, it's unclear why students wouldn't make friends outside of school.

3. Pro claims that it is proven that boys learn better around girls, but this says nothing of whether girls learn better around boys. As such, the claim is flawed and gender-biased in favor of what is good for males. Additionally, as referenced in my position, Pro's claim is not entirely proven. Also, "learn better" doesn't mean "learn more."

4. Pro claims that social awkwardness will be a problem for job-seekers, but does not explain why gender separation in the classroom will diminish interviewing skills in the workplace.

5. Pro claims that co-ed schools promote equality, Simple research demonstrates that co-education has been present in the U.S. for over 200 years, but equality has not followed until recent years. Access to education is part of gender equality, but it is unclear that simply having co-ed schools promotes equality alone.

6. Gender stereotyping is rampant in co-ed schools and in our culture in general, in particular social, sexual, and intellectual stereotypes based on gender. Pro has not offered any argument why a gender-separated classroom would make matters worse.

7. Pro claims that gender-segregated students fare worse than co-ed students. This assumes causation from correlation, which is a fallacy. The studies I cited indicated use of gender-segregated classrooms in situations where students tend to be at-risk, so outcomes of gender-segregated schooling may not be easily compared to co-ed students who already had advantages. This is like saying that crutches make it hard for a person to run.

Pro's arguments were not solidly established, and, contrary to Pro's conclusion, nothing "clearly" follows his arguments.
Debate Round No. 2
thedoctor13

Pro

thedoctor13 forfeited this round.
Beagle_hugs

Con

Well, this has been unfortunate. Anyway, as the Pro has not offered any valid arguments, proof, or defense of his universal resolution, and I have established that there are circumstances under which it is permissible for a school to be gender-segregated, I win this rather pointless engagement.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by lannan13 2 years ago
lannan13
thedoctor13Beagle_hugsTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture
Vote Placed by Bennett91 2 years ago
Bennett91
thedoctor13Beagle_hugsTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: FF, points to Con
Vote Placed by Zack95 2 years ago
Zack95
thedoctor13Beagle_hugsTied
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Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro's instigating argue made no sense in my opinion. I cannot deter whether he is for or against. Also voted in favor of con since pro forfeited.