The Instigator
Sdewalden
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
JMartinez21
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Schools should be required to teach a trade skill class.

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Sdewalden
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/20/2017 Category: Education
Updated: 9 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 350 times Debate No: 101174
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

Sdewalden

Pro

The focus in primary education has shifted in recent decades. With common core policies across the nation, primary schools main focus has turned towards "making the grades" needed to be accepted into a university system to continue education with an importance focused on continuing for a bachelors degree. According to collegedata.com college board, the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2016"2017 school year was $33,480 at private colleges, $9,650 for state residents at public colleges, and $24,930 for out-of-state residents attending public universities. Take a trade like Heating, ventilation, and refrigeration technician, you could take the entire program at RCC for $1,276 plus about $500 for books and fees. If you go to college for a non STEM related degree your average first year job offer is around $49,000 according to business insider. As a first year HVAC technician in California the average first year salary not including overtime hours is in the range of $43,000 -$53,000. If primary schools could help give the needed skills and access to a new trade, it can help streamline the decision process and help put people into the workforce with a good paying job sooner, which will help the economy grow.
JMartinez21

Con

By currently being a high school student I have personal experience of understanding how these school systems prefer "making the grades" but just because schools may enforce this does not mean they are not attempting to teach trade skills. In Rubidoux High School there are many opportunities such like those of Video Production, Agriculture, Publishing, Culinary, Auto Body, and even a Nursing program but it is up to the student if they wish to take these courses. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics we see that most vocational and trade skill courses are already taught in public high schools but high school students typically do not formally enroll. Despite the many advantages these courses may hold it is really the student's own responsibility to enroll in them and if they do not they may seek an education past that of just trade skills. Many students alone already find it difficult enough to decide on their final major and seeing that 80% of students end up changing their life ambitions at least once in their life based off Borderzine Reporting Across Frontiers article. These trade skill classes having a lack of diversity and based off the online site, Classroom, the lack of course and subject diversity constricts a vocational student's knowledge to his career, which he/she may decide to change later on. Trade skill classes preparing students for that job force, but overall limiting to a multiple variety of other jobs that are open for them which they may then decide to strive for.
Debate Round No. 1
Sdewalden

Pro

Students being afforded the opportunity to take some of the trade classes you mentioned is an exciting bit of knowledge to learn. I do want to stress the portion of this debate that calls for the schools being "required" to teach a trade skill class. The requirement would be designed to reach those students that do not yet understand what they are interested in doing as a career. Some high school students are fortunate enough to have been exposed to "other knowledge" outside of a traditional classroom environment because maybe they had a family that had experience with a trade, whether it's a business or just a passion or hobby. The requirement would be most beneficial to the students that don't get that exposure simply because the life they have outside of school doesn't afford them the opportunities to learn a trade skill. As for a trade skill constricting the knowledge to one's career and the possibility to change careers if one decides to later in life, I do agree a bit but, people are responsible for the knowledge they receive through the experiences they have in life. The education you receive initially is not intended, in either scope (traditional education or vocational) to be the final bit of knowledge that is gained. In both paths, the initial knowledge gained is only a stepping stone to further educating ones self to succeed in any industry. A trade school does not have to be a one way road to a career that never changes. In fact a March 2015 article written by BLS.gov states that on average the baby boomer generation held on average 11.5 jobs over their lifetime. It is not uncommon to experience job changes due to downsizing, or technology replacing a workforce. A trade like electrician, or heating and ventilation technician can never be outsourced. They require unique skills and hands on work. With the right trade, not only will your job never go anywhere, you could go anywhere and find a job as long as you are willing to work.
JMartinez21

Con

Seeing and reading how important these trade skills are is quite an eye opener to the different opportunities and paths students may take toward their future. Like you said these are skills that will never go anywhere and the person may also go anywhere in order to fulfill their role. However, as you have mentioned before these trade skills are also available past high school and into community colleges at, what seems, a much lower cost than any other four year university. Our debate focuses around the requirement of public schools to teach these trade skills but despite how important these skills may be there is still modern education that many students need. Due to the recently implemented Common Core for nationwide schools there are now set expectations for students to learn and even though it is about "making the grade" at times these skills are no doubt just as important for students as preparing our future labor forces. By implementing trade skill courses it will no doubt broaden many students horizons, but there is still other necessary education that students require that cannot also fit requiring trade skill classes. Perhaps instead of requiring trade skill classes let them continually be an option for all students to have and take if so desired. Leaving actual trade skill opportunities in the student's capable hands and having them take the responsibility of finding ways to learn of a new skill or even taking the two year community college degree as mentioned before. As the Common Core State Standards Initiative website states, through further implication of these math, englishes, and sciences, students will be able hoan their learning abilities and apply them to later requirements in life such as those trade skills that may take later in life.
Debate Round No. 2
Sdewalden

Pro

As common core is seeping into the education system of our youth, which is a different debat topic for another time, I want to ensure your understanding of my complete agreement in maintaining the "modern education". I feel education is extremely important and do not wish to take anything away from that importance. I simply feel like opening a new avenue of choices to all students will help eliminate some unneeded stress that can arise when a student realizes they do not want to do the traditional college route but they want to be successful. The path for education is not a one size fits all path when it comes to interests. In my life I have learned that if you are not happy with a path you are on, you will not be as successful as doing something that do want to be doing. The saying holds true, "if you find something you enjoy, then you will never work a day in your life". The traditional education path may not be for everyone, and as a society we should introduce different options in an attempt to help those who don't have a means of being introduced to a trade that may bring them the enjoyment they arelooking for, which can help create a stronger economy for all of us. A person sucessfully working in a trade is more beneficial to society than a peron who is unemployed or underemployed in a career or a job that they are not truly happy in. Education is very important, I am only asking to include trades into the educational environment.
JMartinez21

Con

I understand that trade skills jobs are very important in our society and I have seen already how desperately the society is lacking in these specific skills, even seeing in current times how many of our trade labor forces are beginning to lessen. I am not against trade skills being taught, they are an important part of our society, but by requiring them for students to take during their public schooling should not be fully allowed. I am not concerned toward these trade skills taking up all modern education but what I am concerned for is the students themselves. Students can only learn so much at a time, especially teenagers, and then easily lose focus again. I battle through 6 classes each day in my high school, 4 being the essential math, english, science, and history, while the other 2 being elective. Yes, there are openings for 2 electives where possible trade skill requirements may belong, but after focusing so much on the essential math, english, science, and history I can imagine, not just myself, but others too must be mentally exhausted. Then putting the student through another important class such as their required trade skill may even be too much for the student. Seeing in the online Forbes article, "Motivation Matters: 40% Of High School Students Chronically Disengaged From School", that on average 40% of high school students lose all motivation facing such demanding classes. By requiring trade skill courses then it will only push that much more of a burden upon the student. My high school has already implemented some trade skill courses has I have mentioned before, but the difference is that they are not required and are the student's choice whether or not they would want to take the class. By leaving the decision in the student's hands rather than requiring them to take the course it will ensure not all students face this academic suicide while others then take up the task and work through the skill.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Electric 9 months ago
Electric
SdewaldenJMartinez21Tied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: I felt Sdewalden had stornger arguments overall and cited more hard data and less personal experience. I personally wish my education had more value in trade skills. I spent too much time taking classes that did not help me in HS and college.