The Instigator
KuronoaYoshiaki
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Jonbonbon
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Several religions restrict free-thinking

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/4/2015 Category: Religion
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 434 times Debate No: 82078
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (5)
Votes (0)

 

KuronoaYoshiaki

Pro

I believe that several religions restrict people from being able to think their own thoughts. Specifically Christianity and Islam's laws are very restrictive and do not allow people to express themselves. A basic law is in the ten commandments, it restricts people from looking in to other religions. I personally disagree with religious ethics as they repress people's freedom of speech and create social taboos that will always bother me. This may be short, but I usually don't spend most thinking on my opening remarks and wait for an opponent to attack me.
Jonbonbon

Con

Thank you for instigating this debate.

Here I'll just move into the debate to explain why these religions do not restrict free will.

1) Misinterpretation

I believe my opponent has misinterpreted what the verses mean. I'm going to be specifically talking about Christianity, as my opponent did not provide the verse from Islam that he believes restricts free will.

The verse he's talking about basically just says that the God of Christianity is the only God. This doesn't mean Christians aren't allowed to explore other ideologies and belief systems. It's just a verse that keeps Christianity consistent. The Bible wouldn't make sense if there was more than one God. So this verse does not restrict free will. It's just a statement that people need to agree on if they want to follow that religion.

2) Choice

People who are religious are choosing that religion. Now at an earlier age, you can argue they are not choosing, but before the age of say 10 or 11, no belief system is truly there's. Some people figure it out by 13 or sometime in the later teen years. Either way, when people are capable of making an autonomous choice toward their belief, they usually choose. Some take longer than others, but in the end, you can leave a religion and follow a different belief system if you disagree with that religion.

Why is that important?

That means you don't have to follow any ideologies you don't want to. That extends to mean that the people who do follow those ideologies are freely choosing to do so.
Debate Round No. 1
KuronoaYoshiaki

Pro

As I did not include one about Islam, here you go. Islam is a very strict religion and you can tell, by having women wear certain clothing, forbidding certain activities, and making them perform certain daily tasks a day. This is making people essentially cattle, having them do the same thing just like everyone else each day. Also, for Christianity, the bible originally restricts asking psychics, getting tattoos (which restricts people from expressing themselves), women are not allowed to wear certain clothes, getting remarried after divorce ( which is what most Christians do if they are divorced), using polyester, or trimming beards. Doesn't this make people slaves to this religion? (as there is a lot more of these pathetic laws that make people completely give in to the religion) People say these (especially ones from the old testament) don't count anymore, well then your 10 commandments, original sin, and objections to gay marriage don't count either.
Jonbonbon

Con

Thank you for that response.

1) Islam

I need my opponent to be more specific. The fact that Muslim women generally wear the same thing does not justify the position. And the examples provided otherwise are extremely fague. Everyone has daily tasks they're required to complete, and even in the religious examples, people generally feel some sort of gratification for completing those tasks.

2) Christianity

Allow me to explain why Levitical Law isn't applicable anymore.

Levitical Law (the law in the Old Testament that my opponent referenced) was only ever meant to be temporary. Here's the misinterpretation. People see it as an overall religious law. Levitical Law was actually a form of governance meant for Ancient Israel.

The laws that apply to modern day Christians are all listed in the New Testament. The 10 commandments were all restated in the New Testament, making them applicable.

A proper exegesis of the Bible is needed for this debate.
Debate Round No. 2
KuronoaYoshiaki

Pro

KuronoaYoshiaki forfeited this round.
Jonbonbon

Con

Thank you for reading.
Debate Round No. 3
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Jonbonbon 1 year ago
Jonbonbon
Well yeah but you sound like you're saying that religions restrict free thinking, but Thad not what God intends.
Posted by Dave.Carter 1 year ago
Dave.Carter
You can debate an atheist about what the Bible does or does not teach can't you?
Posted by Jonbonbon 1 year ago
Jonbonbon
Dave, for that verse to apply to the person you're debating, they have to believe in God.
Posted by Dave.Carter 1 year ago
Dave.Carter
Are there not various exegesis of the bible?
Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. (Proverbs 3:5)
Case closed.
Posted by Jonbonbon 1 year ago
Jonbonbon
So I'm getting this vibe that your arguments are founded more in a sense of disgust than anything else. Mind keeping it a little more civil? I'm a person too despite my belief system.
No votes have been placed for this debate.