The Instigator
KillerSCorpion321
Con (against)
The Contender
missbailey8
Pro (for)

Should Animals Be Kept In Captivity?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Debate Round Forfeited
KillerSCorpion321 has forfeited round #3.
Our system has not yet updated this debate. Please check back in a few minutes for more options.
Time Remaining
00days00hours00minutes00seconds
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/15/2017 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 820 times Debate No: 99952
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

KillerSCorpion321

Con

I think animals should not be kept in captivity. Because some animals might not have what they need in their area. Say a lemur is inside a building and only gets food, water, and one tree to climb. Does it have what it needs? No, it would need a natural habitat.
The Christmas Day tiger mauling at the San Francisco Zoo that killed a 17-year-old boy and severely injured two men has ignited a national debate about whether wild animals should be held in captivity.

When a 350-pound Siberian tiger named Tatiana killed Carlos Sousa, it wasn't the first time that the animal had attacked someone. On Dec. 22, 2006, the animal attacked a zoo keeper, who survived.

Police are investigating whether the three victims provoked the tiger to scale a 20-foot wall and jump over a moat.

"If you go across a barrier at a NASCAR race and go on to the track, you get hurt," said Jack Hanna, director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo, on "Good Morning America" today.

But Adam Roberts, senior vice president of the animal protection advocacy group Born Free USA, said caging animals can create problems for both humans and the animals.

"It's not good for the animals," Roberts said on "GMA" today. "It's not good for humans either. First, the animals are put in unnatural settings. They're taken out of their biological comfort zone and the way they actually live in the wild and forced into these artificial enclosures on concrete, behind bars."

Roberts argued that having animals in unnatural environments provides no educational value.

"You're not getting the right education about what animals are like in the wild. That's why we believe that you should keep wildlife in the wild. That's best for animals and it's best for the people," Robert said.

"We're not getting an educational benefit from zoo-going or from circus-going, and more importantly, as you unfortunately have seen recently, there is the potential for attack," he added.

But Hanna vigorously disagreed, saying millions of dollars had been spent to ensure the health of animals and education of people.

"I take great offense to anyone saying there's no education done there," Hanna said. "Most of these animals live better than people in the world. You have to have the love for animals in order to save animals, and that's what we teach. " We're doing the best we can to provide habitat for these animals."

For zoos that are lacking suitable animal habitats and settings, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and others are working to close them down, Hanna said.

But those actions haven't appeased objectors.

"It's not enough to say we're pouring money into education or conservation without quantifying exactly what that means," Roberts said. "It's very easy to say we're doing it, but we have to see the results. AZA's [Association of Zoos and Aquariums] own research has suggested that we don't know whether the results on educational values of zoos are conclusive or not."
missbailey8

Pro

Hey. This guy plagiarized. http://abcnews.go.com...

Just wanted to accept this so no one else would be forced to debate someone who doesn't have original arguments.

Bye.
Debate Round No. 1
KillerSCorpion321

Con

I think animals should not be kept in captivity. Because some animals might not have what they need in their area. Say a lemur is inside a building and only gets food, water, and one tree to climb. Does it have what it needs? No, it would need a natural habitat.
The Christmas Day tiger mauling at the San Francisco Zoo that killed a 17-year-old boy and severely injured two men has ignited a national debate about whether wild animals should be held in captivity.

When a 350-pound Siberian tiger named Tatiana killed Carlos Sousa, it wasn't the first time that the animal had attacked someone. On Dec. 22, 2006, the animal attacked a zoo keeper, who survived.

Police are investigating whether the three victims provoked the tiger to scale a 20-foot wall and jump over a moat.

"If you go across a barrier at a NASCAR race and go on to the track, you get hurt," said Jack Hanna, director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo, on "Good Morning America" today.

But Adam Roberts, senior vice president of the animal protection advocacy group Born Free USA, said caging animals can create problems for both humans and the animals.

"It's not good for the animals," Roberts said on "GMA" today. "It's not good for humans either. First, the animals are put in unnatural settings. They're taken out of their biological comfort zone and the way they actually live in the wild and forced into these artificial enclosures on concrete, behind bars."

Roberts argued that having animals in unnatural environments provides no educational value.

"You're not getting the right education about what animals are like in the wild. That's why we believe that you should keep wildlife in the wild. That's best for animals and it's best for the people," Robert said.

"We're not getting an educational benefit from zoo-going or from circus-going, and more importantly, as you unfortunately have seen recently, there is the potential for attack," he added.

But Hanna vigorously disagreed, saying millions of dollars had been spent to ensure the health of animals and education of people.

"I take great offense to anyone saying there's no education done there," Hanna said. "Most of these animals live better than people in the world. You have to have the love for animals in order to save animals, and that's what we teach. " We're doing the best we can to provide habitat for these animals."

For zoos that are lacking suitable animal habitats and settings, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and others are working to close them down, Hanna said.

But those actions haven't appeased objectors.

"It's not enough to say we're pouring money into education or conservation without quantifying exactly what that means," Roberts said. "It's very easy to say we're doing it, but we have to see the results. AZA's [Association of Zoos and Aquariums] own research has suggested that we don't know whether the results on educational values of zoos are conclusive or not."
missbailey8

Pro

...

He just did it again with the exact same article.
Debate Round No. 2
This round has not been posted yet.
This round has not been posted yet.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Dirty-Morgs 1 year ago
Dirty-Morgs
only losers plagerise
This debate has 0 more rounds before the voting begins. If you want to receive email updates for this debate, click the Add to My Favorites link at the top of the page.