The Instigator
Emily1358
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Wretched_Lime
Con (against)
Winning
1 Points

Should Hoverboards be banned?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Wretched_Lime
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/6/2016 Category: Technology
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 778 times Debate No: 87751
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

Emily1358

Pro

I think that they should be. Yes, they might be fun, but only until it sets someone's feet on fire. It is reported that there were at least 77 hoverboard accidents that happened in the first 5 days since Christmas. One hoverboard destroyed a $1 Million dollar home located in Nashville, Tennessee on February 10th. The house held a Mother, Father, and a Son and a Daughter. They got out alive, but with burns and no shelter or food. Hoverboards have also exploded. These items cost at most $10,000 depending on which it is, but that's $10,000 or less that has set fire, exploded, and caused destruction.
Wretched_Lime

Con

I will argue against the resolution that hoverboards should be banned. Since you're prescribing an action, you instigated the debate, and you're arguing the Pro side the onus is on you to prove your case that they ought to be banned; I will endeavour to prove that they ought not to be banned, but if neither you nor I is able to make a sufficiently convincing case I should win because the onus is on you.

Hoverboards ought not to be banned because the risk is small. Hoverboards were a very popular holiday gift and 77 accidents is small compared to the total number of the devices sold. Only 22 of the accidents were fires, the majority are falls; anyone can fall from anything, risk of injury from falls isn't sufficient cause to ban an item else ladders, bicycles, skateboards, and many other things should be banned. People should be free to decide whether the risk of injury outweighs the fun they could have from the boards, we don't need an outside force to make the decision and prohibit us from buying and using them.

The already small risk can be further reduced without jumping to the very extreme reaction of a ban. The following tips recommended by the CPSC chairman[1] can greatly reduce risks:
1.Avoid buying the product at a location (like a mall kiosk) or on a website that does not have information about who is selling the product and how they can be contacted if there is a problem. 2.If you do not think you could find the seller again, were a problem to arise with your board, that should be a warning to you not to do business with them.
3.Do not charge a hoverboard overnight or when you are not able to observe the board.
4.Charge and store in an open dry area away from combustibles (meaning items that can catch fire).
5.Do not charge directly after riding. Let the device cool for an hour before charging.
6.If giving a hoverboard to someone for the holidays, leave it in its partially charged state. Do not take it out of the package to bring it to a full charge and then wrap it back up. Often, the product comes partially charged. Leave it in that state until it is ready to be used.
6.Look for the mark of a certified national testing laboratory. While this does not rule out counterfeits, the absence of such a mark means your safety is likely not a priority for that manufacturer.
7.Do not ride near vehicular traffic.
8.It is important to wear safety gear when using a hoverboard. We recommend the same safety gear that you would wear when riding a skateboard -- a skateboard helmet, and knee and elbow pads and wrist guards for protection from falls

Some of the risk can be reduced by imposing safety standards, which are a less restrictive and less extreme action than a ban. Manufacturers should use quality batteries to reduce the risk of fine, a third party could do testing to ensure that the products meet reasonable safety standards. A disclaimer should accompany all sales informing the consumer of the risks and some tips to help reduce them.

Some of the costs associated with damages from hoverboard accidents can be attempted to be recovered by tort law. This helps make right any wrongs caused by manufacturers and sellers failing to disclose risks.

Source 1: http://www.cpsc.gov...
Debate Round No. 1
Emily1358

Pro

Emily1358 forfeited this round.
Wretched_Lime

Con

Most of the risk from hoverboards is confined to the people riding them. Hoverboards shouldn't be banned because the risk to other people (which itself is small) is minimal. Since the risk is mostly limited to themselves people should be free to decide whether the risk is worth the reward.

I apologize for this very short and hastily written R2. I'm sick with a fever and it's hard for me to get anything done right now.
Debate Round No. 2
Emily1358

Pro

Emily1358 forfeited this round.
Wretched_Lime

Con

I'll use R3 for a brief summary.

The risk of hoverboards is small, the reaction of a ban is big; the prescribed action of a ban is too extreme of a reaction to a small threat.

Since the risk is mostly limited to the user of the board that person ought to be free to decide whether that risk is worth the fun for them. If they hurt someone else then restitution can be made through tort law.

Other less extreme measures than a ban (disclaimer, insurance, recall on defective models, safety standards for battery, etc.) can be taken to mitigate the already small risks that the boards pose.

Following the safety advice recommended by the Consumer Product Safety Commission can eliminate some of the dangers.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by fire_wings 1 year ago
fire_wings
Emily1358Wretched_LimeTied
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Total points awarded:01 
Reasons for voting decision: ff