The Instigator
niltiac
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
hcps-landrumce
Pro (for)
Winning
9 Points

Should Native American Mascots be Banned from sports teams?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
hcps-landrumce
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/21/2013 Category: Sports
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 6,617 times Debate No: 33984
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (3)
Votes (2)

 

niltiac

Con

Well, many believe that the Native American mascots are racist &/or offending. I, for one, am not native american but I duly believe it would be an honor to have a professional sports team representing your race/nationality. I understand the other side's opinion when many say that some logos or mascot names such as the logo for the Cleveland Indians logo or the term "redskin". However, just these small adjustments can be made without having to revoke the whole idea of having a Native American culture mascot.
hcps-landrumce

Pro

The entire idea around using Native Americans as a mascot is offensive. Mascots or logos are often highly racist and stereotypical. For example, the mascot for the Cleveland "Indians" is a ridiculous grinning, red-skinned Indian named "Chief Wahoo".
Some people claim that Native American people should feel "honored" that they are being represented by schools and sports teams, but many Native Americans feel the complete opposite.
But the Merriam-Webster dictionary says this: "The word redskin is very offensive and should be avoided." The term "Redskin" refers to the redness of a Native American"s skin color. It has also been said that it refers to the bloody skin of Native Americans that were considered prizes.
Debate Round No. 1
niltiac

Con

That is a valid argument, however...
Royce Young, CBS writer & sports manager says "But why can"t OU bring back Little Red? Oklahoma prides itself on being "Native America." American Indian heritage is something that is more prevalent in this state than any other in the nation. Would it be so wrong to have Native American imagery representing "Native America?" "

Also, I believe you stated "Some people claim that Native American people should feel "honored" that they are being represented by schools and sports teams, but many Native Americans feel the complete opposite" In your argument above?

In our next argument I will show you what's wrong with that statement.
hcps-landrumce

Pro

To answer your question above, yes, I believe it would be wrong. The imagery you mentioned above includes mocking Native American religion, culture, and ideologies. The Atlanta Braves do a tomahawk chop at their games where thousands of fans mock Native American culture. The logos, along with other societal abuses and stereotypes separate, marginalize, confuse, intimidate and harm Native American children.

If this is the way Native Americans are being represented by sports teams, it needs to stop.
Debate Round No. 2
niltiac

Con

You make a strong argument, however you're saying YOU believe that Native Americans feel opposite?

That's a false fact. 79% of Native Americans ages 20-50 state that they feel honored by the Native American presence in public sports. Only few of the very many native american mascots are racist, and only those few should have to change.
hcps-landrumce

Pro

...those few should have to change."

You just agreed to my point.

Certain Native American mascots have negative effects on Native American children going to those schools, and are considered by physchiatric experts a contributory factor towards native kids attempting suicide. Imagine if you were American Indian attending a school where the mascot is a name that has always been considered a slur in your home. How would you feel?

For those reasons, the condemnation of Indian mascots is supported by the American Indian Education Association, National Education Association, American Psychological Association and the American Indian Psychologists Association. The National Congress of American Indians, which has well over 300 Indian nations as members, has signed a resolution, condemning American Indian sports team mascots. Other organizations, Indian and non-Indian, join the condemnation.
I would say that Native Americans support the banning of "Indian" mascots, and that's far from a false fact.
Debate Round No. 3
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by samwilly67 2 years ago
samwilly67
no
Posted by Ragnar 4 years ago
Ragnar
I could not help but imagine if there were a smiling black slave mascot...
Posted by hcps-amazingkid 4 years ago
hcps-amazingkid
I think you lost hcps-landrumce but it wont let me vote because this site is a dumb dumb.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 4 years ago
Ragnar
niltiachcps-landrumceTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: In future: PLEASE GIVE LINKS TO YOUR SOURCES! Argument: Con proved that morally they should be banned, even if it is unlikely to ever happen. Even for a primarily Native American team, it's a harmful stereotype that should end.
Vote Placed by SaintMichael741 4 years ago
SaintMichael741
niltiachcps-landrumceTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro's writing was much better, talked about multiple organizations, and was more more clear about his points. Con needed to elaborate more and use more convincing sources other than an uncited percentage.