The Instigator
jessica01
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
themohawkninja
Con (against)
Winning
11 Points

Should Physical Education be banned from schools?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
themohawkninja
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/24/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 3,251 times Debate No: 41150
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (2)

 

jessica01

Pro

Physical Education is mandatory every day in most public and catholic schools. The kids are required to play sports, exercise and run. Yes, as this may be good exercise for them, I believe it should be banned. These kids are being required to sprint excessive amounts of time and it could take a toll on their body. They are being forced to play sports that they are not capable of. If there leg hurts or they have a physical injury, they are required to complete PE until they get a doctors note. What if they hurt it that day? You are expecting a child to play sports with a twisted ankle?
If you want the children to get a certain amount of exercise a week then have them bring home a paper on Monday and by Friday they are required to have a signature from a parent or athletic teacher saying they have had the required number of hours of exercise complete.
themohawkninja

Con

"These kids are being required to sprint excessive amounts of time and it could take a toll on their body."

How much time is excessive? I would like to make the point that man children that are involved in P.E. classes are athletic individuals who would not see such sprinting as "excessive". Secondly, exercise is supposed to put a toll on your body, as the pain you feel when exercising is due to a combination of lactic acid (short term) and muscle fibers tearing, which are then repaired in such a way to make them more resilient (long term) [1].

"They are being forced to play sports that they are not capable of."

Why should that matter? Twice as many schools (averaged 33.59%) grade students on just trying than they do performance (averaged 16.782%) [2]. What you are saying is the P.E. equivalent of asserting that kids are being forced to do math that they don't know how to do when they are only being graded on whether or not there are answers on the paper, while ignoring whether or not the homework is even correct.

"If there leg hurts or they have a physical injury, they are required to complete PE until they get a doctors note. What if they hurt it that day? You are expecting a child to play sports with a twisted ankle?"

While I am unable to locate statistics, I will assert that many if not most schools ranging from public high schools to prestigious universities allow students to make up their P.E. class period if they are unable to do anything in class [3][4]. Even if you just Google "PE make-up form", you get over 81 million results with at least the first page (if not many more) being just comprised of make-up forms for P.E. classes [5].Secondly, it's not that the P.E. instructors are expecting children to play sports with a twisted ankle, but rather that since there is no proof, who's to say that the child isn't merely faking to get out of class?

"If you want the children to get a certain amount of exercise a week then have them bring home a paper on Monday and by Friday they are required to have a signature from a parent or athletic teacher saying they have had the required number of hours of exercise complete."

A parent could easily lie about that sort of information. For example, in the U.K: "Admission forms from more than 1,000 families in 91 councils were queried in 2012/13 because of concerns about fake addresses, bogus baptism certificates, and even families claiming, falsely, that a child already in a school was a brother or sister to get a place under the "sibling rule". As for an athletic director, how would they keep track of all of the kids?

1. http://www.nytimes.com...
2. http://everychildstronger.org...
3. http://mitpe.com...
4. http://www.columbia.k12.mo.us...
5. https://www.google.com...
Debate Round No. 1
jessica01

Pro

Yes, you may say that exercise should take a toll on your body but there is a point when it becomes too much. Some kids are not able to run or exercise but are not able to go to the doctors or seek medical help. At. Local school school near me, i watched 4th period PE to see how they did it. These kids were sprinting back and forth for up to 10 minutes. These kids were panting asthey stopped but the PE teacher could care less. After there so called "warm up" was done, they then played flag football. I do not know how to play this game but I was watching to see how they taight. There was a child there who obviously didn't understand the sport but the teacher was yelling at them.
themohawkninja

Con

"Yes, you may say that exercise should take a toll on your body but there is a point when it becomes too much."

This is true, but can you prove that this amount (which is most likely quite subjective to the individual) occurs in a statistically frequent enough amount to warrant a ban on physical education in school?

"Some kids are not able to run or exercise but are not able to go to the doctors or seek medical help."

Can you prove that there are enough kids in a school that are unable to do exercise and are also unable to receive medical help to warrant a ban on physical education?

"At. Local school school near me, i watched 4th period PE to see how they did it. These kids were sprinting back and forth for up to 10 minutes. These kids were panting asthey stopped but the PE teacher could care less."

So you observed one set of students in one demographic in one area at one time. That isn't a very scientific observation. Secondly, panting is simply a way to regulate the temperature of an organism [1]. You wouldn't complain about exercising because you were sweating, because it's expected that you will sweat a bit if you get a good exercise.

"After there so called "warm up" was done, they then played flag football. I do not know how to play this game but I was watching to see how they taight. There was a child there who obviously didn't understand the sport but the teacher was yelling at them."

Why was the teacher yelling at the child? Was it because the child clearly wasn't trying, or was it because the child wasn't performing well? If it is the latter, then that is one example and probably doesn't apply to the rest of the country as I have shown in round one.

1. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoregulation#Thermoregulation_in_birds_and_mammals
Debate Round No. 2
jessica01

Pro

This kid was obviously trying as hard as they could from what I could see and the teacher was yelling at them for not playing correctly. Not all children are going to be superstar athletes but these PE teachers are not realizing it. These kids are dreading each day of PE because they are afraid they will not please their teacher and they don't want to be called out and embarrassed in front of the class.
themohawkninja

Con

"This kid was obviously trying as hard as they could from what I could see and the teacher was yelling at them for not playing correctly."

Ah, so the child was being verbally reprimanded for not doing what they are told. A teacher wouldn't be a very good teacher if they didn't do anything when a child didn't do as they were told.

"Not all children are going to be superstar athletes but these PE teachers are not realizing it."

I highly doubt that your teachers actually think that all of their students are going to be "superstar athletes". Even if they do, that is only one teacher in one school relative to the entire country. That's hardly statistically significant.

"These kids are dreading each day of PE because they are afraid they will not please their teacher and they don't want to be called out and embarrassed in front of the class."

Are all of the kids really dreading each class, and are they really afraid that they will be embarrassed? Even if they are, do they represent a statistically significant portion of the children who take P.E. classes to warrant a ban on physical education in school? I highly doubt it.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
jessica01themohawkninjaTied
Agreed with before the debate:-Vote Checkmark-0 points
Agreed with after the debate:-Vote Checkmark-0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:-Vote Checkmark-2 points
Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro had a heavy BoP to meet in this one... ARGUMENT: Con demolished pro's case, and used my favorite tactic of quoting what they're responding to (makes it very easy to follow). Pro even failed at cross examination, when con tried to guide their argument into a better form by requesting sources to prove one of pro's points. SOURCES: The above failure cements this, but con used a number of ones making his case seem properly researched, instead of just a rant.
Vote Placed by jvava 3 years ago
jvava
jessica01themohawkninjaTied
Agreed with before the debate:-Vote Checkmark-0 points
Agreed with after the debate:-Vote Checkmark-0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:-Vote Checkmark-2 points
Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Con clearly won. He provided at least some sort of resource - Pro's argument was largely based on emotion, not fact.