The Instigator
joep200
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Steve221
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Should Schools Have the Power to Enforce Hair Color, Hair Length and Beard Regulations?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/7/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,661 times Debate No: 31039
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

joep200

Con

I believe that schools exist to educate. When I was in school many people were told not to dye their hair eccentric colors, and were thrown into isolation if they did. I've heard from others that boys were not allowed to grow their hair long or grow beards in their schools. This would often cause unnecessary conflict between teachers and pupils, with the pupils receiving the raw end of the stick, naturally.
Schools should not have the power to dictate a doctrine of near-robotic uniformity in something which is not clothes--something which the pupils take with them after they leave school and go home or stay with their peers and socialize. I believe that schools are inhibiting the self identification process which all teens go through as they grow up. I also hold the belief that an entire body of pupils who look like they've just come from an assembly line does not look good, so much as one of those stereotypical images of communism.
Like I said, schools are there to educate. They should not serve as an authoritative force presiding over the self-image of each of its pupils.
Steve221

Pro

I too believe that the soul purpose of the education system is to educate our youth and prepare them with knowledge they will need in the future. In this debate I will show why it is necessary for any school to give students a strict set of guidelines and rules about their appearance.
examples I will be using in this debate are as follows:
1.) avoiding distractions: why neon colored hair, beards, clothes and facial hair can hinder other students ability to learn.
2.) specific guidelines that schools do have: why these rules are not "unfair" to the students

I look forward to my opponents opening argument.
Debate Round No. 1
joep200

Con

I would like to start by, firstly, thanking my opponent for accepting this debate, and, secondly, addressing the two points my opponent made in their opening statement. But before I move on to the second point I would like to remind my opponent that we are talking about hair, not clothes. If clothes become relevant to the argument later on then I will engage in debate about them.
Firstly, if brightly colored hair is to be banned based on a flaccid premise of distraction--if indeed the fine-tuning of the learning environment needs to be tweaked so extremely--why not ban all pupils from having their own schoolbags? Why not ban brightly colored posters in the class room? Why not ban colorful textbooks which so mischievously grasp the attention of a pupil, laying there on the bookshelf? Why not ban all of these things which have never distracted me to the point of hindering my ability to learn? Indeed there is one aspect of a classroom which has often taken my attention as I gazed into the world of daydream--the window. Yes, looking outside and into the sunlit day has often stolen my focus. Why not ban windows?
To remain on the point of distraction, I have to testify that a beard has never hindered my ability to learn. Nor has it ever hindered the learning of anyone that I know. I have never come across evidence which even faintly suggests that it does. Nevertheless, my teachers thought otherwise"they did indeed think that it was a distraction to the pupil in question and those around them. So, of course, that pupil was placed in isolation. If there"s one thing I can think of which is a dire hindrance to learning, it's not being in the classroom and instead being in an environment with no educator--isolation in a nutshell, basically.
Ultimately it amounts to pupils being taught that it's wrong to change themselves--and change is a huge part of learning and the development of self-identity.
Steve221

Pro

Steve221 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
joep200

Con

joep200 forfeited this round.
Steve221

Pro

Steve221 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by JOhn_D.5ilver 3 years ago
JOhn_D.5ilver
This is the kind of topic someone who wants to test his debating skills would engage with. Not really room to debate and therefore interesting to see if they could win. Other that that I would like to add that you should look upon this example and apply it wider.
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