The Instigator
muffinjacker
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
kevin24018
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Should Sex-Ed Be Mandatory in Tennessee State Public Schools?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/27/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,074 times Debate No: 64031
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

muffinjacker

Con

Sex-Ed should not be mandatory in public schools unless it is needed. The current policy in the state of Tennessee is that Sex-Ed is only mandatory once a county reaches a certain percent of teenage pregnancies.
kevin24018

Pro

I should be Mandatory.
1. It's not just about sex, there are public health issues involved, ways to prevent disease and unwanted pregnancy.
2. Some wouldn't get accurate information if it was not available in school.
3. The risk of not educating students or that they maybe misinformed is too great not to make it mandatory.
Debate Round No. 1
muffinjacker

Con

1. It is the responsibility of the parent to address sex when it comes to their child. Having sex ed in schools is imposing on the job of the parent by teaching the child about sex. It is up to the parent when and how their child learns about sex. It is not and should not be the responsibility of the school.
2. Teaching kids about sex and having save sex does not guarantee that they will participate in safe sex. Just because you know how to do something does not mean you WILL do it.
3. Sex ed costs money. Supporting sex ed programs in schools will cause tax payers to pay more money for the resources and equipment needed for the classes. Tax payers want to LOWER taxes, not increase them. The taxes would have to be increased to be able to support this.

Addressing your first point: Providing information about safe sex in sex ed classes does not insure that people will HAVE safe sex, nor does it mean that pregnancy will go down. Birth control does not always work. It may help, but it does not guarantee that this problem will be fixed.

Addressing your second point: You say that some wouldn't get the information if it weren't provided in schools in this class. However, that isn't true. In every day life and in some of my required classes in schools, we have learned about diseases (regular diseases and STD's). I believe that your point is invalid.

Addressing your third point: You say that the risk is too great not to educate students, but students learn about them early on before high school, which is when the class would be taken. Parents talk to their kids about them and kids see, hear, and read information about them in the media almost every day. It's hard not to learn something when you have your face buried in your phone or your laptop, searching the internet.
kevin24018

Pro

while I agree it is the parent's responsibility, that obviously doesn't always happen. In addition the information may not be current, complete or accurate. The issue of when it should be taught is a tangent and a different issue altogether.
With regards to tax burdens. Health care costs related to disease treatment and unwanted pregnancy is a far greater expense than the classes would ever be. "The average cost of HIV treatment is $14,000 to $20,000 a year," says Michael Kolber, MD, a professor of medicine and director of the Comprehensive AIDS Program and Adult HIV Services at University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida.
The goal is to get as many students as accurate information as possible. The best way to do that is professional teachers. To your point a student could learn anything they wanted to on their own and yet a majority of learning is not done that way yet. Students could learn math via the Internet as an example and yet math is still taught in schools by teachers. While it would be a wonderful world if people would educate themselves on stds and so many other important issues on their own, that is not the real world.
Debate Round No. 2
muffinjacker

Con

I agree that people should be educated, but having sex ed doesn't necessarily help. 'The Government's teenage pregnancy strategy is doomed to failure because it sets enormous store on sex and relationships education when clearly it is not working.' said Dr. Daniel Wight, a lead researcher at Glasgow University. Sex ed is only effective when the students want to learn. The same goes for any class. If you decide to hate the class and do not want to learn anything in the class, you won't learn anything. You would automatically block out what the instructor says about the subject. You simply cannot teach someone who is not willing to learn. I find it hard to discover teens that want to learn about sex. Many teens that I know have had sex by the end of their freshman year in high school; some have even had sex in middle school. Sex ed should be taught when sex becomes an issue, if it is to be taught at all. Sex ed classes are taught in high school, not middle school. Making sex ed mandatory will not fix the issues that begin at such an early age. If you want sex ed to be mandatory, you have to also make a petition saying that the age the class is taught at should be changed as well. Another point is that people so young shouldn't be having sex, therefore they shouldn't be taught how to have safe sex. It encourages the students to participate in sexual activities, therefore putting them at risk. A good point to make is this: If the students believe that they are old enough and responsible enough to be having sex, they should be responsible enough to understand how it works, use birth control properly, and educate themselves, as well as their partners. Sex is not something meant for children, therefore the topic should not be taught to them.
kevin24018

Pro

You have some good points and much of what you said I agree with. However the topic is not what age should it should be taught, if it is being taught adequately, correctly and if it encourages sexual activity.
Making it mandatory has many benefits.
Some will learn something even if they aren't interested which is better than nothing.
There is potential risk of teasing and peer pressure if the course is an elective for those who are interested in learning.
The benefits of prevention (std,pregnancy etc) far out weigh any arguments against.
Ultimately the information needs to be presented to make the best informed decision one can make. But the bottom line is for the individual to make that decision (freedom of choice). Having been fully informed the decision and consequence then falls on the shoulders of the individual.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by kevin24018 2 years ago
kevin24018
exactally
Posted by PillarOfSalt 2 years ago
PillarOfSalt
Sex Ed isn't just about preventing pregnancy, it's also about preventing STD's and it informs the students that do not particularly know all about sex and what it can cause.
No votes have been placed for this debate.