The Instigator
jlogreco93
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Nick_Cima
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should Socrates have drunk the hemlock?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/7/2013 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 806 times Debate No: 31060
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

jlogreco93

Pro

-Socrates was indeed correct in drinking the hemlock, because if he had not done so, the entirety of his defense throughout the Apology would have fallen short and would have cast a negative affect to those who so closely listened to and followed his teachings. Socrates found himself against the men of Athens when he was placed on trial and was ultimately sentenced to jail to drink the hemlock. When in prison Socrates was given the option to leave and run away from Athens to another land where he could live and continue to spread his "teachings.' Although this would have been the easy route to take, Socrates wisely chose to remain in jail to follow through with his sentence. He was wise in making this decision because Socrates himself believed there should be laws and that people should follow them. The men of Athens believed he had gone against their laws and should be killed for it. One of his many beliefs was to be an honorable man towards everything he did, so when he was given his sentence, no matter how just or unjust it was, the only way to stay honorable and follow his morals was to drink the hemlock and take his own life.
Nick_Cima

Con

- No, I believe that Socrates was absolutely wrong when he decided to drink the hemlock for a variety of different reasons. To start things off he was thee greatest philosopher during his time. Throughout his life he helped multiple citizens of Athens and people in general interpret the different ways that one could think or understand different topics or theories. Socrates wanted to die on his own terms, which he could not because he was forced to drink the hemlock. Yes, he could have escaped from prison to continue his teachings, but he didn't. Not because he wanted to follow through with his sentence, but that if he ran away the government would then know that Socrates had committed the crime, which he did not. What do you mean that if Socrates did not drink the hemlock by the entirety of his defense throughout the Apology would have fallen short and would have cast a negative affect to those who so closely listened to and followed his teachings? First off the court system proved Socrates guilty in an unjust manner as the evidence was not supported. And Socrates was not liked by the citizens to begin with as they thought he was a arrogant showoff. Socrates had no reason to drink the hemlock, he didn't deserve it and should have kept on living his life.
Debate Round No. 1
jlogreco93

Pro

Yes, Socrates was unrightfully accused of corrupting the youth and was unjustly sentenced to imprisonment and death. But as you said, Socrates was a man who felt responsible for helping others to understand society and by not going through with drinking the hemlock, he would have been seen as a dishonorable man; and that"s the last thing Socrates was. This being said, Socrates himself had a couple different options to choose from in order to cope with this ultimate punishment. Although he had the option to escape imprisonment and banish from Athens forever, suicide was ultimately his only and best option. As stated in David Hume"s article "Suicide," "I may add, that though death alone can put a full period to his miser, he dares not fly to his refuge, but still prolongs a miserable existence, from a vain fear lest he offend his maker, by using the power with which that beneficent being has endowed him." This perfectly states why suicide was truly his only option. Leaving jail and continuing his teachings elsewhere, Socrates would have run the risk of committing this "crime" and facing this punishment once again. But by drinking the hemlock and taking his own life, Socrates put the power into his own hands and made the decision to end his life once and for all.
Nick_Cima

Con

- Yes, I do agree with you when you state that Socrates was accused of "corrupting the youth" as he taught students his different thoughts and ideas that he believed in especially revolving around agnosticism. And he was definitely unjustly sentenced to imprisonment and death as he did not commit the crime. How could you call drinking the hemlock suicide? Drinking the hemlock was his punishment and ultimately resulted as a death penalty that was forced upon him as he had no other choices, this was all for a crime that he did not commit. The Athens government did not like Socrates for the actions that he performed in their society. The government of Athens believed that Socrates talked down about or did not believe in the Greek beliefs involving their variety of gods and goddesses. But what they did not know is that Socrates himself believed in a "Devine spirit" also known as a type of god. The spirit guided him through his life and told him everything that he should do and what Socrates did is listened his spirit which got him into the position that he was in. So the accusation that Socrates did not believe in a god is false as he truly does.
Debate Round No. 2
jlogreco93

Pro

- I would like to begin by saying that I can call drinking the hemlock suicide because he, as I had stated and you agreed with before, was given the opportunity to escape. At no time was Socrates pinned down and forced to drink the hemlock, he drank it under his own power. Although you and I both agree that Socrates was unjustly sentenced to death, some things cannot be avoided. To better enforce this statement, I will refer to a brief excerpt from Epictetus" "The Enchiridion." "Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and, in one word, whatever are not our own actions." Socrates in the end of it all did not prove himself to be innocent. He was still found to be guilty in Athenian court and even for this reason alone he was right for drinking it. But he was also right for drinking it because if he did not, his so-called "teachings" of living a good and honorable life no matter what the cause, would have meant nothing.
Nick_Cima

Con

- As we are in agreement that the court system found Socrates guilty in an unjust way as the accusation could not have been proved with evidence that would back it up. The court system did not and could not find an appropriate or a correct way for a philosopher such as Socrates to die as this was stated within the "Phaedo." Socrates could have and should have escaped from prison so he could continue on with his life and spread his knowledge to others. The reason he drank the hemlock is because Socrates was faced with no other options, as if he escaped which he had the opportunity to do it would have made him look as if he committed the crime. Also it is obvious that he was not pinned down and the hemlock was shoved down his throat, but this was Socrates's "death penalty" which entails that he must drink it as that is his punishment. They do give him the opportunity to decide if he is ready to drink it or not as he must drink it. And the only reason he was found guilty by the Athenian government is because they disliked Socrates for his actions and his overall well being, so there was no doubt that he was going to be found guilty. This corrupt government killed a wise man that did not deserve it as there was no evidence shown and in the end resulted in the death of an incredible philosopher.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Wallstreetatheist 3 years ago
Wallstreetatheist
You should both drink the hemlock.
No votes have been placed for this debate.