The Instigator
whatthe.evrocks
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
christian.hughes
Con (against)
Winning
11 Points

Should Students Get Paid For Good Grades?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
christian.hughes
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/21/2015 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,079 times Debate No: 70464
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (3)

 

whatthe.evrocks

Pro

First of all, I want to greet my opponent on this matter. I do not know yet who will be debating with me, but I want to say, most people with be with and supporting the fact that students should get paid for good grades. Ok.
First, I want to point out that school is very much like parents' work. The students can learn new things at school, and their parents also can learn at work, too. Also, the parents get paid for their work, if they do it well, and if students do their work well too, they should get paid. Kids have every right as their parents do to earn and keep and have money, and also to spend it in any way they want, but responsibly. Thank you, and to the Con.
christian.hughes

Con

I would like to start this debate by giving my opponent the best of luck. Should students be paid for obtaining good school grades? I myself am a student in England and despite the fact that I would love to receive payment for my long school hours and hard work, I will try to view this topic from a standpoint of practicality.

Personally, I agree that many students would find payment for there school grades extremely motivating and would be far more enthusiastic with there approach to school work. However, the first (and most obvious) problem with this idea is where the funding would come from. Whilst many parents would happily support there loved children by giving them money for obtaining great grades at school, this would not be a possibility to many families. I personally live in the UK and in the UK 1 in every 6 households are deemed as 'poor' and 'underprivileged' by the UK's government. This concludes that 1 in every 6 parents within the UK would probably not have enough finance to simply hand out to there children under the condition of good grades. Many families may also feel pressured to do so resulting in unnecessary stress for parents and students alike.

My attention now instantly turns to the government. Would the government pay children to achieve good grades? Obviously, the answer due to reasons of practicality and safety is no. The funding for this concept would have to be collected by tax meaning while it is a possibility, many residents may become annoyed with the fact they are having to pay more money every year which is (whether they like it or not) given to there children. Children of age's around 16-17, which is when most children will take GCSE or other exams and therefore receive grades, may also be deemed as irresponsible as some children/teens of this age group are typically known to spend money on alcoholic beverages and even illegal drugs. Parents or even the government would therefore be funding the illegal activities of teens and even promoting drinking.

Motivation (as I previously mentioned) would be the main reason for adopting a new scheme such as this so I would now like to focus your attention on this point. Motivation is obviously the driving force that keeps people going but is it really right to motivate children with money? I personally believe that moral support is one of the strongest methods of motivation and could be far more successful (and economically sustainable) than simply paying off children. If my mother gave me "100.00 but did not aid me otherwise I would feel lost and unsure of how to peruse relatively simple tasks such as completing homework as I would not have the aid of my family just economic benefit. This could also lead to future problems as one may simply feel that instead of supporting friends and family it is appropriate to pay them instead.

I would now like to finish the first phase of this argument by responding to your point that 'adults' in modern day society get paid for work and why should it be any different for children? 'Adults' are perceived to be far more mature than children and my previous point about children wasting the money or even spending it on alcoholic beverages is reinforced through this idea. Most adults have families to raise and bills to pay and the majority of there income will on average be spent on supporting families and attending to these needs. Adults need money to survive in this modern day society however children normally do not as there needs are accommodated by there loving parents.

I would like to thank you for this first round of stimulating debate and look forward to hearing your response.

sources : BBC news - http://www.bbc.co.uk...
Debate Round No. 1
whatthe.evrocks

Pro

Okay, I like the point that you made, that parents are much more responsible and mature with their money, and they also need to pay their bills and stuff. But then you stated the thing about alcoholic beverages. This is true, but most of the people that get paid for good grades have good grades, right? That means they would be sensible enough not to go buying illegal drugs and beer.
Yes, it also gives them motivation. When kids are motivated or encouraged by something they desire, they tend to do better and focus more on what they are supposed to do. Therefore, paying students who not only work hard (not for the money, but for the desire of better grades.) but actually try their best is more or less a good idea. For bad kids that only want the money, they can still have it, but do they feel moral? Or even as if they achieved something? For students that haven't gotten good grades, or students who have never experience getting rewards, this is a good idea, to encourage them and get them going for good grades. But for students that also already get good grades, this is a good chance to help them and motivate them to work even harder, to their limits.

Now I present the Con, who will further state his points. I have found that he is a very worthy opponent, and I look forward to the further arguments he/she will make.
christian.hughes

Con

I would like to start with an unusual but needed request for you to change the font back to a basic font with which you are writing. I used a lot of valuable time simply deciphering your response and i believe that no communication barriers such as this should obstruct the debate.

Again, I would like to start this section of the debate by looking into your point about motivation. You stated that 'kids are motivated by things they desire' which is most definitely a true statement however, I do wish to re-alliterate that not all kids desire money. Many children would simply prefer moral support to payment as this has proven to be far more effective than simply paying off kids. I would like to turn your attention to this article I found and more importantly to 'Adam'. http://www.theguardian.com... Adam quotes in this article that 'no attempt was made to support me'. Adam was one of the more unfortunate children to leave school with zero GCSE qualifications but do you really believe paying Adam under the condition of good grades would have helped and given him the support he would have needed? I am going to take some liberty in answering this for you, no it would not. Even Adam himself discussed the fact that he lacked proper tuition. Adam also had a paid job at the time and what he wanted more than the money was a real education. Simply bribing him to do well would have made no difference at all as he still could not exercise his rights to education.

Secondly, I would like to discuss your other point that children who receive good grades are mature and would not spend there money on irresponsible purchases. To support this point, I would again like to focus your attention on the same article. http://www.theguardian.com... It quotes that 95% of students leave school with a GCSE qualification and that only 5% of applicants leave with no qualifications. This means that 95% of students would receive some sort of payment from this scheme but, is it safe to assume that 95% of students are mature enough to spend that money responsibly and not on drugs or alcoholic beverages? To support this, I would now like to focus your attention on another fact sheet posted by the IAS. http://www.ias.org.uk...
This fact sheet contains a table which shows that within seven days of the survey being taken, 56% of 15 year old pupils in Scotland 2010 were drunk at least once. Now, compare this 56% of drunks to the 95% of students who pass at least one GCSE exam, the government would clearly be funding underage drinking. These figures show that we cannot simply jump to the conclusion that students who receive good grades are mature. So, I would like you to note that i cannot agree with your statement that children who succeed are responsible in the slightest. The statement is far too stereo-typical perceiving all aspects of intelligence to also resemble maturity.

Finally, I would like to re-illiterate one of my initial questions and I hope for a response : where would the money come from to fund a scheme such as this? As mentioned in round one, 1 in 5 children in the UK are deemed to be living in Poverty so parents would not be able to (or may be overcome by unnecessary stress in order to) give there children money if they succeed. And would the government pay for the success of children? The answer due to reasons of practicality and safety is no. The funding for this concept would have to be taxed meaning while it is a possibility, many residents may become annoyed with the fact they are having to pay MORE MONEY every year which is (whether they like it or not) given to there children, and this money could then be spent on drugs and alcohol.

I would like to thank you for another fascinating round of debate, and I am deeply excited for the third round.

sources: The Guardian- http://www.theguardian.com...
IAS- http://www.ias.org.uk...
BBC news - http://www.bbc.co.uk...
Debate Round No. 2
whatthe.evrocks

Pro

I am sorry I cannot finish this debate in time for my graduation trip to New York. I therefore forfeit this debate. Thank you, and sorry again.
christian.hughes

Con

Ok, don't worry about it! I thank you for all of the interesting points you made and for the overall enjoyment I have gained from this debate. Thank you once again and good luck in all your future debates.
Debate Round No. 3
whatthe.evrocks

Pro

Pass. Thank You.
christian.hughes

Con

Thank you for the great debate and i am sorry you had to forfeit.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Welqra 1 year ago
Welqra
It seems every debate worth having doesn't have an opponent I disagree with.

I'd try to play devil's advocate, but I'd rather not lose a debate.
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by Zarroette 1 year ago
Zarroette
whatthe.evrockschristian.hughesTied
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Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro gracefully concedes.
Vote Placed by Blade-of-Truth 1 year ago
Blade-of-Truth
whatthe.evrockschristian.hughesTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct - Tie. Both had appropriate conduct throughout the debate. S&G - Con. Pro utilized a hard-to-read font which forced me to translate it personally. This is not something that should be placed on a judge, rather, it seems Pro went out of his way to use the unusual font. Due to this unnecessary act, I award these points to Con. Arguments - Con. Pro conceded the debate in Round 3. Sources - Con. Pro failed to utilize sources within this debate whereas Con did. This is a clear win for Con.
Vote Placed by John95 1 year ago
John95
whatthe.evrockschristian.hughesTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Both sides make a extraordinary case for their viewpoint.