The Instigator
NickMDebate
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
1Devilsadvocate
Pro (for)
Winning
7 Points

Should Violent Video Games Be Banned?

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Post Voting Period
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after 1 vote the winner is...
1Devilsadvocate
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/28/2013 Category: Technology
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 3,971 times Debate No: 29654
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (4)
Votes (1)

 

NickMDebate

Con

Violent video games should not be banned. Last year, the massacre in Sandyhook restarted the video game argument. Adam Lanza was "obsessed" with Call of Duty Black Ops II, but so were 82% of all people his age. Lanza's mother owned a gun, and trained Adam to use it. Most of all, Lanza had mental health problems. Violent video games dont hurt the public, but IGNORANCE TO MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES DOES. Everybody wants a quick fix to problems like this, so they immeadiately turn to banning video games, instead of taking a harder, more expensive, more difficult approach in attacking the real problem, mental health. While this is a tougher plan, it is the real one, not a kneejerk reaction. I have several friends who play video games, and none of them have tried to harm anyone they know in the way Lanza did. My final message is that people need to solve the real problem at hand, and forget the pointless video game debate, and go after America's mental health concerns.
1Devilsadvocate

Pro

This is the 2nd time that I've taken a debate on this topic. The 1st 1 ended a F.F.
I hope my opponent will see this to the end.

Science has come to a general consensus that violent TV does have an effect on kids' behavior.

video games have additional reasons for concern, leading psychologists to believe that it is worse than TV.

1) video games are even more likely to affect people's behavior than TV because they're immersive. People don't just watch video games; they interact with them.
2) The games are also repetitive
3) based on a rewards system.
Repetition and rewards are primary components of classical conditioning, a proved psychological concept in which behavioral learning takes place as a result of rewarding (or punishing) particular behaviors.

The brains of children and teens are still developing, & are thus even more susceptible to this type of "training."

THE EVIDENCE:

A 2001 study reported in the journal "Psychological Science" ( the highest ranked empirical journal in psychology)
found that:
"Children who play violent video games experience an increase in physiological signs of aggression."[1]

In 2006 at the Indiana University School of Medicine researchers found that kids who played violent game showed increased activity in the amygdala, which stimulates emotions, and decreased activity in the prefrontal lobe, which regulates inhibition, self-control and concentration. [2]

The 2008 study Grand Theft Childhood reported that 60% of middle school boys that played at least one Mature-rated game hit or beat up someone, compared to 39% of boys that did not play Mature-rated games.[3]

In March 2011 A study published in the afore mentioned "Psychological Science" found that:
"playing violent video games is associated with denying humanness to other people and Violent Video Games Increase Aggressive Behavior."[4]

The APA:

The (APA), is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and is the world's largest association of psychologists. The following are from the APA:

Article: "Video Games and Aggressive Thoughts, Feelings, and Behavior in the Laboratory and in Life,"
Craig A. Anderson, Ph.D., Iowa State University of Science and Technology and Karen E. Dill, Ph.D., Lenoir-Rhyne College:

Violent Video Games can Increase Aggression:

"...Video games may be more harmful than violent television and movies because of the interactive nature of the games.
Playing violent video games increase a person's aggressive thoughts, feelings and behavior both in laboratory settings and in actual life. violent video games may be more harmful than violent television and movies because they are interactive, very engrossing and require the player to identify with the aggressor...

...Violent video games provide a forum for learning and practicing aggressive solutions to conflict situations," said Dr. Anderson. "In the short run, playing a violent video game appears to affect aggression by priming aggressive thoughts. Longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well, as the player learns and practices new aggression-related scripts that can become more and more accessible for use when real-life conflict situations arise...

...One major concern is the active nature of the learning environment of the video game," say the authors. "This medium is potentially more dangerous than exposure to violent television and movies, which are known to have substantial effects on aggression and violence..."[5]

"Two studies examined violent video game effects on aggression-related variables. Study 1 found that real-life
violent video game play was positively related to aggressive behavior and delinquency... Academic achievement was
negatively related to overall amount of time spent playing video games. In Study 2, laboratory exposure to a
graphically violent video game increased aggressive thoughts and behavior. The results from both studies are consistent with the General Affective Aggression Model, which predicts that exposure to violent video games will increase aggressive
behavior in both the short term (e.g., laboratory aggression) and the long term (e.g., delinquency)...

...Violent video games provide a forum for learning and practicing aggressive solutions to conflict situations. The effect of violent video games appears to be cognitive in nature. In the short term, playing a violent video game appears to affect aggression by priming aggressive thoughts. Longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well, as the player learns and practices new aggression-related scripts that become more and more accessible for use when real-life conflict situations arise. If repeated exposure to violent video games does indeed lead to the creation and heightened accessibility of a variety of aggressive knowledge structures, thus effectively altering the person's basic personality structure, the consequent changes in everyday social interactions may also lead to consistent increases in aggressive affect. The active nature of the learning environment of the video game." [6]

"Research shows playing violent video games increases aggressive behavior and decreases helpful behavior..." [7]

From APA's Resolution on Violence in Video Games and Interactive Media:

"...Exposure to violent media increases feelings of hostility, thoughts about aggression...

Comprehensive analysis of violent interactive video game research suggests such
exposure a.) increases aggressive behavior, b.) increases aggressive thoughts, c.) increases
angry feelings, d.) decreases helpful behavior, and, e.) increases physiological arousal
(Anderson, C.A., 2002b; Anderson, C.A., Carnagey, N. L., Flanagan, M., Benjamin, A. J.,
Eubanks, J., Valentine, J. C., 2004; Anderson, C.A., & Dill, K. E., 2000; Bushman, B.J., &
Anderson, C.A., 2002; Gentile, D. A., Lynch, P. J., Linder, J. R., & Walsh, D. A., 2004).

Studies further suggest that sexualized violence in the media has been linked to
increases in violence towards women, rape myth acceptance and anti-women attitudes.

The characteristics of violence in interactive video games appear to have similar
detrimental effects as viewing television violence; however based upon learning theory (Bandura,
1977; Berkowitz, 1993), the practice, repetition, and rewards for acts of violence may be more
conducive to increasing aggressive behavior among children and youth than passively watching
violence on TV and in films (Carll, E. K., 1999a). With With the development of more sophisticated
interactive media, such as virtual reality, the implications for violent content are of further concern,
due to the intensification of more realistic experiences, and may also be more conducive to
increasing aggressive behavior than passively watching violence on TV and in films (Calvert, S.
L., Jordan, A. B., Cocking, R. R. (Ed.) 2002; Carll, E. K., 2003; Turkle, S., 2002); and
studies further suggest that video games influence the learning processes in many
ways more than in passively observing TV: a.) requiring identification of the participant with a
violent character while playing video games, b.) actively participating increases learning, c.)
rehearsing entire behavioral sequences rather than only a part of the sequence, facilitates
learning, and d.) repetition increases learning (Anderson, C.A., 2002b; Anderson, C.A., Carnagey,
N. L., Flanagan, M., Benjamin, A. J., Eubanks, J., Valentine, J. C., 2004; Anderson, C.A. & Dill, K.
E., 2000)..." [8]

[1] http://www.apa.org...
[2] http://www.soc.iastate.edu...
[3] http://repository.upenn.edu...
[4] http://www.academia.edu...
[5] http://www.academia.edu...
Debate Round No. 1
NickMDebate

Con

NickMDebate forfeited this round.
1Devilsadvocate

Pro

:( extend :(
Debate Round No. 2
NickMDebate

Con

NickMDebate forfeited this round.
1Devilsadvocate

Pro

Extend.

Vote pro.
Debate Round No. 3
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by NickMDebate 3 years ago
NickMDebate
Ya ok
Posted by 1Devilsadvocate 3 years ago
1Devilsadvocate
I think you misunderstood tvellalott, he wasn't trying to "hate" your argument.

On the contrary, he was saying that there so good that he can't think of a way to win.
Posted by NickMDebate 3 years ago
NickMDebate
Ok tvellalott if u want 2 hate on my arguments then be a man and challenge me. If not keep ur mouth shut and go back 2 ur parents basement
Posted by tvellalott 3 years ago
tvellalott
*tries to think of a way to successfully argue devil advocate on this*
*fails*
*tries to think of a way to successfully troll a way to victory*
*can't be bothered*

Meh.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Skepsikyma 3 years ago
Skepsikyma
NickMDebate1DevilsadvocateTied
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Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: Full points for forfeiture.