The Instigator
EFDebate
Con (against)
The Contender
TheDangerZone
Pro (for)

Should a man be allowed to sign away his custodial/financial obligations to a child?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/29/2016 Category: Society
Updated: 2 days ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 58 times Debate No: 97463
Debate Rounds (4)
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EFDebate

Con

Should a man be allowed to sign away his custodial/financial obligations to a child if the woman wants a child but he doesn't?
Rules:
This is an LD style debate
No profanity
Make sure you provide value and criterion
Please be respectful with the opinions said during the debate

Who ever takes this debate will be affirmative. They will have first say like in actual LD debate. Your first response will be your case.
TheDangerZone

Pro

I believe that if a man signs away his financial obligations to a child it can be a pro for the economy by giving a child responsibility of money so then they can end up being good with money in their futures
Debate Round No. 1
EFDebate

Con

Although the opponent didn't fully understand the resolution, we will continue the debate. For clarification, the meaning of the resolution for affirmative is that the man should be able to sign away their rights.

value - morality
criterion - personal obligation

Overall child support payments averaged $5,150 annually, or $430 per month.
About 85 percent of payers were male and 15 percent were female.
Male providers paid an average $5,450 annually, or $455 per month.
Female providers paid an average $3,500 annually, or $290 per month.
About three of every four child support providers had some type of an agreement or court order for support.

Child support collection also positively affects family relationships and increases the involvement of noncustodial parents in children"s lives. This means that the father who if responsible for paying for the child that he may or may not have wanted is more likely to form bonds and improve the overall enthusiasm of the child.

contention 1 - Child support payments decrease child mortality rates and increases child well being.

child support reduces poverty and financial insecurity among children and custodial parents. It reduces public spending on welfare by preventing single-parent families from entering the welfare system and helping them leave the system more quickly. evidence pulled from "The rate of participation in at least one public assistance pro-gram has increased for custodial parents in the last few years.16Among custodial mothers,34.9 percent received at least one form of public assistance in 2007. By 2011, this proportion had increased to42.9 percent. Custo-dial fathers were less likely than custodial mothers to participate in at least one public assistance program in 2011 (23.3 percent)." This shows that if the payments stopped, the child would be put in a much worse situation. In the year 2008, around 625,000 children would have been below the set poverty line if child support payments had not been payed to the family with custody. This payment that allows for the children to not be poor decreases the child mortality rate and allows for the well being of the child to significantly increase. The Father that is paying this child support has a personal obligation to assure the survival of this child. This means that the father must pay and cannot skip out even if he didn't want the child in the first place. This personal obligation upholds morality in which the

http://www.ncsl.org...

Timothy S. Grall, Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2011 (Washington, D.C: United States Census Bureau, December 2010)
Jose Y. Diaz and Richard Chase, Return on Investment to the FATHER Project (St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research, November 2010)
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Debate Round No. 2
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Debate Round No. 3
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Debate Round No. 4
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