The Instigator
StormySkies
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
gabesnyds
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should depression be treated as seriously as physical ailments?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/25/2014 Category: Health
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 531 times Debate No: 60913
Debate Rounds (3)
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StormySkies

Pro

I'm starting this debate again, since Aerogant's account was closed so he can no longer bother me.

In many schools, depression and other mental illness are not treated as seriously as physical sickness and injury (such as the flu, or a broken leg). Despite the level of depression or anxiety a student is having, they are still obligated to go to school, which can be seriously detrimental to the mental health, and eventually even physically unhealthy.

The same can go for adults as well, when they have to continue working without rest despite how they feel mentally.

You can open the debate with acceptance or opening arguments.
gabesnyds

Con

If a child presents a clear and present danger to themselves or others, then a teacher should (and in most states, is legally required to) contact authorities. In all other cases, students should be obligated to go to school.

Through the rest of this debate, I will prove that the best thing for a depressed student is almost always to stay in school. In school, students face social interaction, mental stimulation, and, quite simply, being outside of the house. All of these benefit, not hinder, a depressed students mental state. In addition, I will show that while parents often ignore symptoms of mental illness, teachers and other school staff can gain insight into a child's state of mind and, if necessary, help seek out professional guidance.
Debate Round No. 1
StormySkies

Pro

Thank you for accepting.

That is true. But it's better to prevent students from ever reaching that point, instead of waiting until the situation is that extreme.

Depression is characterized by a sad feeling, feeling of emptiness, lack of motivation, etc. Sometimes, instead of pulling the student out of the depression, going to school could lead to a vicious cycle. It is true that students face social interaction and mental stimulation, but sometimes these things can apply more pressure on the depressed/anxious student, making them sink deeper into a feeling of hopelessness or emptiness. In fact, school and social problems are some of the most common triggers for depression.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com...

Forced interaction with many other students can lead to bullying and gossiping, while common, it can cause children or teens to feel worthless, and even hurt others or themselves.

In addition, children or teens may feel that they are stupid. This is also a tremendous trigger.

Keep in mind, I'm not saying that children and teens should ditch school, or be absent most of the time. I'm just saying that there shouldn't be any sort of judgement if a student needs to have a few days of break from school, to improve their mental health.
gabesnyds

Con

gabesnyds forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
StormySkies

Pro

StormySkies forfeited this round.
gabesnyds

Con

gabesnyds forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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