The Instigator
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0 Points
The Contender
Con (against)
5 Points

Should homeschool student be allowed to play public school sports?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/20/2016 Category: Sports
Updated: 4 months ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 276 times Debate No: 91574
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (1)




States use a unique vocabulary in this area: "extracurricular," "cocurricular," "curricular," "interscholastic," "program," "activity," etc. Care should be taken to distinguish one from another. When a state defines a word, it is important.
While athletic association rules are not "law," public schools are generally constrained to operate within them, or their teams could be disqualified. We therefore refer to association rules of particular importance in a number of entries.


I accept.

I am glad my opponent has decided to argue this issue and hopefully bring more clarity to the universe one debate at a time.

Now, before I begin, let me respond to your points

First of all, what country are we talking about? America? Not everyone on this site is American you know. So clarify that please.

Pro presented two points.

(1) States define the boundaries of what a sport qualifies as, to be different things. Several definitions names were presented, but not the definitions. So as of right now, this point has no pertinence whatsoever on the resolution which is "Should homeschool students be allowed to play public school sports?" It may seem evident that this argument of definitions by Pro does not address whether sports for these students should happen, but it bears mentioning.

(2) Public Schools not having all their students adhere to these standards, can result in team disqualification from athletic associations. A couple questions and clarifiers. First of all, what athletic associations are you referring to? What rules within those associations? As of the moment the amount of warrants for this claim amount to zero, and voters on this site are not supposed to take just "your word for it". They need evidential proof. So answer what association you are addressing first. Second, how many times have disqualifications resulted in leagues being unable to function and/or kids who consider sports their only opportunity not being able to participate on a sports team? How many teams have had those problems? I would argue those are the only reasons that a disqualification of a sports team could be detrimental in a large enough way to warrant change. Once again, Pro has no warrants for this claim, just their say so.

Now I have some arguments why homeschool students should not be allowed to participate on public school teams. Bear in mind voters I am homeschooled, so I will be speaking from some experience here.

1. Homeschool students are outcasted by public school students.

This is a common epidemic these days. Homeschoolers get made fun of by public school students who are either annoyed by the unsociable skills of said homeschooler, or by making the public schooler look bad for numerous reasons. But those are not the only sources of bullying and verbal abuse. There are multiple reasons why it can occur, but note that it does.

According to PBS, "But as any high school freshman can attest, getting along in school isn’t just a matter of academics. Kenneth Bernstein... estimates that about half of his previously homeschooled students experience “some difficulties in adjusting,” though, he adds, “once they form networks of friends, these largely disappear.” A larger issue than finding friends, says Bernstein, is the fact that some students who come from a homeschool setting have not been exposed to “diverse points of view,” and thus aren’t used to being in settings where their patterns of thinking get challenged by students or teachers whose ideas are very different. For these students, a high school government class can feel foreign—or even hostile."

Now clearly the quote is moderate, but the point it is helping me make is that some homeschoolers do not get along well with public school students. What does that have to do with joint sports? Teammates on sports teams need to work together. If they don't then their team loses games. Putting these different cliches together on a team and meshing them, can in the average situation, be a recipe for issues.

2. Moral environment change.

One thing that can be agreed upon probably by both of us, is that public schools in America are secular, and are meant to be that way per Supreme Court decisions. So these schools have no moral code except the country's laws. Besides that, kids can do whatever they wish in school, as long as it is not disruptive.

For the parents who do hold religious beliefs, if they homeschool their kids it is recognized that their kids will pick up those beliefs. Or at the least, they will believe that a moral framework is the only correct way to live life. According to the Department of Education in a recent survey, about 64% of homeschool parents from 2011-2012 cite the wish to provide religious instruction as a reason to homeschool. In 2006-2007 the number was 83% []. So when homeschool kids encounter public school kids on a joint sports team, who are willing to use foul language, make out, drink, party, and do other less moral things, then homeschoolers will be highly uncomfortable. When they are uncomfortable, they cannot perform at their peak, and the team suffers.

3. Coaches can have an undesirable impact on homeschool kids.

Let's keep in mind that the coach is a public school coach. So the crossover is completely on the homeschooler's part. That means they don't have the assurance that their coach is someone who isn't undesirable to their wishes (the parent's wishes). If they get a coach like that, and they made a commitment, then they are stuck all year with that coach. That situation can lead to friction, and harm on the team.

With these arguments, I eagerly await my opponents response!
Debate Round No. 1


Wesroxs22 forfeited this round.


According to his profile, this is his only debate, he joined three days ago, and was last online three days ago. *sigh I seem to have found yet another troll. For a five round debate. Vote for me please. VOTE CON.
Debate Round No. 2


Wesroxs22 forfeited this round.


Debate Round No. 3


Wesroxs22 forfeited this round.


Debate Round No. 4


Wesroxs22 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by whiteflame 1 month ago
>Reported vote: Reigon// Mod action: NOT Removed<

5 points to Con (Arguments, Sources). Reasons for voting decision: Con provided sources while Pro FF'd every round.

[*Reason for non-removal*] Full forfeit debates are not moderated unless the voter votes for the forfeiting side.
Posted by 42lifeuniverseverything 4 months ago
Thanks for the vote Reigon!
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Reigon 4 months ago
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Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Con provided sources while Pro FF'd every round.