The Instigator
niltiac
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
nyltiak
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should homework be banned in middle and elementary schools?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/22/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,875 times Debate No: 34037
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

niltiac

Pro

I believe homework in elementary schools should be banned.

I believe this mainly because 88% of students grades 3-8 participate in at least 1 out of school activity after school, and with homework, this can cause them to be jam-packed and/or stressed.
nyltiak

Con

I believe that homework should not be banned in middle and elementary schools.

1. Many students are struggling in school, and more practice outside of school can help improve their grades with help by their parents and other family members.
Debate Round No. 1
niltiac

Pro

You make a valid argument, however...
If a student is struggling in school, they can easily gain help from other sources, without having to be more confused by extra work.
nyltiak

Con

I understand what you are trying to say, however...

There are not a lot time when the homework is so confusing that the student's parents can't even help them with it, and if they can't, there are websites that can help them and/or they can email their teacher with the questions. Homework doesn't confuse people more, they just enhance the topic that the teacher is teaching to help them understand it more.
Debate Round No. 2
niltiac

Pro

Thank you for your input, but...

If homework is really confusing, not even parents may understand it. I know that both me AND you come to school in the mornings confused about how hard our science homework was. 90% of students grades 6-8 surveyed state that they think that homework is very challenging and stresses out their evenings.
nyltiak

Con

I see your point, however...

If the homework is so confusing to the student that means that they are not very good at the topic and need extra practice. The challenging homework allows the student's teacher's to acknowledge the student's weakness in turn giving them an chance to improve and acquire new skills. They need homework to help improve their academic abilities in that topic/subject and point out their weaknesses so that they can improve and get extra help to understand the topic.
Debate Round No. 3
niltiac

Pro

"If the homework is so confusing to the student that means that they are not very good at the topic"
You and I both know for a fact that not being good at the topic has nothing to do with the homework. However, if the homework is the same as the material taught in class that the students did not understand, then it will be twice as hard, considering they may not have all the notes and resources they may need to become more familiar with the topic.

"The challenging homework allows the student's teacher's to acknowledge the student's weakness in turn giving them an chance to improve and acquire new skills"

This is not true at all. Few teachers do nothing with the student"s homework except simply skim over it, not noticing the wrong answers present on the page. The only way teachers can check on their student"s academic progress is through graded classwork"s, quizzes, and tests.

"They need homework to help improve their academic abilities in that topic/subject"
Would you mind showing some evidence? All that is present in your arguments are personal experiences and opinions.
nyltiak

Con

I see what your trying to say, but..

You are the one that is only talking about your personal experiences and I am speaking for all the children mainly in middle school. You talk about how homework is confusing to you because you don't understand it but that is not the same for all children. I truly believe that homework is better for children and it improves their academics.

According to http://en.wikademia.org...; "Homework should not be banned because if there were no homework no body would succeed at anything because homework is like practice and without practice our teams would not be any good." I think that this explains what I have been trying to say the whole time. Also, taking time each night to do homework is a chance for students to catch up on missed class and further reinforces the day's lessons.

"Several studies have proven that homework, in fact, does improve the balance of the student in school this strengthens the statement that time spent completing homework is time well spent." http://en.wikademia.org...

Instead of playing outside of playing video games when a child gets home from school they are doing homework, which entitles the student to 30 minutes to an hour of enriched education. Yes, I do agree that sometimes the homework that I receive is challenging and takes me a while to complete. However, I do also agree that the challenging homework helps me improve in the topic and brings up my grade.
Debate Round No. 4
niltiac

Pro

You said that I talk about personal experiences? That's a false statement.

You can search my debates, not once have I mentioned how I struggle with my own homework, even if I do, I had not mentioned anything about my personal experience.

"I truly believe that homework is better for children and it improves their academics."
Sounds like an opinion to me...

"According to http://en.wikademia.org......; "Homework should not be banned because if there were no homework no body would succeed at anything because homework is like practice and without practice our teams would not be any good."
Does this show any evidence or facts? No. It shows an opinion of a website that is a lot like wikipedia.

"Also, taking time each night to do homework is a chance for students to catch up on missed class and further reinforces the day's lessons"
This is called make up work, which is a little bit different from homework.

"Instead of playing outside of playing video games when a child gets home from school they are doing homework, which entitles the student to 30 minutes to an hour of enriched education"
Many students do not do their homework at all. (http://www.usingenglish.com...) In fact they believe it is either too easy, too difficult, or is not a main priority for their day. Homework is also very boring for students in elementary and middle school, they would rather participate in more entertaining activities such as sports, outdoor playing, or hanging out with friends.

In your first sentence of your last argument, you stated the following: "You are the one that is only talking about your personal experiences and I am speaking for all the children mainly in middle school."

Then, in your last paragraph you stated this: "Yes, I do agree that sometimes the homework that I receive is challenging and takes me a while to complete. However, I do also agree that the challenging homework helps me improve in the topic and brings up my grade."

I believe that the statements stated above by yourself in the exact same argument show that you have been contradicting yourself by blaming me of stating personal information while you have been doing this yourself.

"...challenging homework helps me improve in the topic and brings up my grade."
This too, is a false statement. Piling on the homework doesn't help kids do better in school. In fact, it can lower their test scores.

That's the conclusion of a group of Australian researchers, who have taken the aggregate results of several recent studies investigating the relationship between time spent on homework and students' academic performance.

According to Richard Walker, an educational psychologist at Sydney University, data shows that in countries where more time is spent on homework, students score lower on a standardized test called the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA. The same correlation is also seen when comparing homework time and test performance at schools within countries. Past studies have also demonstrated this basic trend. "These after-school activities have much more diffuse goals than single subject test scores," he wrote. "When I talk to parents " they want their kids to be well-rounded, creative, happy individuals " not just kids who ace the tests." (http://www.lifeslittlemysteries.com...)

Homework also kills the school and child experience.

"They don't have time to just be kids anymore -- they're so bogged down. And since many of the assignments are simply busywork, learning often becomes a chore rather than a positive, constructive experience. Homework overload is also affecting family life -- a lot of kids can't even make it to dinner, and as a result, the only interaction they have with their parents involves arguments about homework," says Sara Bennett, researcher and anti-homework enthusiast (http://www.parenting.com...)

But the biggest fallacy of all lies in our near religious confidence that more homework makes better students. If homework were a prescription drug, the FDA would long ago have demanded its recall. Over the years, homework has been subjected to a series of controlled trials. These trials vary considerably in their attempts to control for such confounding variables as the education and financial well being of the parents. Bringing together all such trials into the kind of meta-analysis often attempted with respect to drugs is a difficult task, but it so happens that one respected investigator has done so. Harris Cooper, a close student of the subject, reports that "The conclusions of past reviewers of homework research show extraordinary variability... Even in regard to specific areas of application such as within different subject areas, grades or student ability levels, the reviews often directly contradict one another." Even where a positive correlation is established, it is not clear whether homework makes good, well motivated students or privileged and well motivated students do homework. Cooper's work is unequivocal in its conclusion that no significant gains for homework are established for the elementary school years. (http://www.alternet.org...)

Just as tellingly, virtually no one so far has attempted to ascertain the side effects of homework. What are its effects on families, on children's life long interests in the learning? Our own ethnographic research shows that extensive homework assignments have played a major role in school dropouts. In interviews with high school dropouts as part of a study for the Maine Department of Education, we asked students if there was a moment when they knew they were going to drop out of school. Their tales told the story of incomplete homework, of parent-child conflict exacerbated by homework demands that seem to grow as fast as the time parents have available shrinks.
nyltiak

Con

nyltiak forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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