The Instigator
boots6978
Pro (for)
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The Contender
Gandhi
Con (against)
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Should it be legal for children under the age of 15 to be able to work in Canada?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/19/2013 Category: Society
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 4,565 times Debate No: 31441
Debate Rounds (2)
Comments (4)
Votes (0)

 

boots6978

Pro

Children under the age of 15 should be able to work because every child hates to depend on their parents for everything. As long as the child's well being or health is not at risk I don't see the problem in a kid stepping up and realizing that once he/she reaches a certain age then that is the time that he/she will start taking care of themselves and mature into the people that they will become. Experience is also a great factor for children in shaping their personality's and in helping them become aware and grounded in the world that they live in. So that when they are old enough to move out of their home and start creating a life of their own, they won't be terrified in learning all of the things that they now need to do. To start working at a young age such as 12/13, a child starts to understand the world in small portions at a time with a less dramatic, Oh My Gosh affect in the kids life.
Gandhi

Con

I heartily accept your challenge, and I hope that this will be a clean and interesting debate.

I am not from Canada, but there is a similar problem in the United States. Also akin to your situation, I wanted to work before the age of 15, but was not able to. Being above 15 now, and working, here are some reasons as to why it's not practical to hire before 15.

1. Many jobs require tasks that a person < 15 could not do

In America, many jobs which are held predominantly by teenagers are in supermarkets or other retailers. However, most of these jobs are in the back, where these people are called "stock boys". Stocking requires a lot of heavy lifting, which may cause injury in someone who is not physically capable. This incapability may lead to physical injury, something that, of course, companies don't want to be held responsible for. Also, there are certain jobs that don't require physical strength, but responsibility, such as using the grease fryers in a fast food restaurant. No company wants to hold a 13 or 14 year old kid in charge of a large, boiling vat of grease; if they get burned, any sensible parent would want to press charges.

2. Kids under 15 are not always the most responsible lot

In the US, kids get a temporary permit at 15, and get their full license to drive at 16. This license is essentially a certificate of responsibility, as if it says "look, I can transport myself around and get to work on time". Without a license, parents or friends would have to drive the employee to work every day. This essentially puts responsibility of showing up to work on time in the hands of not the employee, but the parent or friend. What if they're running late, or if they have another appointment and can't drive you? This 15 year old limit ensures that the employee alone is responsible for themselves, and does not have to trust others to do half of their work for them.

3. Just stay in school

Let's say someone hires you at 13 or 14, and you get paid well (which you won't, by the way. Probably after your first paycheck you'll realize that you're working for almost nothing, especially if you're working few hours). You may like this job, and want to stick with it. However, just because you're making good money now doesn't mean that you won't make more in the future if you continue your studies. If you work now, you may not put as much effort into school as you usually do, since you'll have less time; thus, your grades slip and your chances of getting a good education slowly recede out of your grasp. Now, you drop out of high school because you aren't doing good in school and you're already making a living, but what you don't realize yet is that good things come to those who wait, and you'll realize that these jobs are not really stepping stones, they're traps which fool you into thinking you're making a good living.
Debate Round No. 1
boots6978

Pro

Round 2 Argument-


I have read through your argument and still believe that children under the age of 15 should be able to work. I say that because I am not sure if you are aware of this but the human brain grows until you reach 22 years of age, so if a child actually does end up dropping from school because they can't deal with school and going to work then they always have a chance to go back or to re-due the grade a year after so they feel more ready to continue on in the line of work and school as a mix... Also you are assuming that the child would be working full time, when no "suitable parent" like you had stated before would allow their child to work full time when they know that their kid will still have to go to school and keep up with their studies. To address the getting to work, if the parent, employer, and child can't agree on certain days of the weekend, or time off from school then definitely I think the child should wait a few more years to start working. Also not every child will be hired to do every job... If you have ever been in an interview room, which I'm sure you have, you would know this. And in the way of the parent wanting to press charges, any person going into a job should know the consequences of misbehaving or knowing their limits. Yes some children under 15 are not the most mature but that is why I think it is important for them to get a job, if working and giving something your all doesn't change your personality to make you more mature in strong are you telling me school will? School helps children with learning and definitely prepares you for the world and teaches discipline, but not in the way different types of jobs will. I have a job as a baby sitter and child care giver, and will soon be getting another by helping my mother in a soup and sandwich café. I am doing a paper on whether children under the age of 15 working should be legal or not. I am 13.
Gandhi

Con

I thank PRO for responding.

The key word to your argument is that the brain "grows" until 22. That is to say, the brain is more developed at say, 16, than 13. Obviously, you are very mature for your age, but again, not everyone is physically and mentally capable of dealing with an occupation in the workforce, whether it be full or part-time. A job puts a lot of stress on adults, let alone children. Thus, any kind of work, while not physically strenuous, may critically affect a person's personality, social life, desire to achieve, etc.

Also, you completely skirt around my argument that jobs can and sometimes will hurt a person physically, whether it be from heavy lifting, burns, powerful equipment or just all-around dangerous tasks. Further, you display your immaturity by using the fact that one can just "re-do" a grade in school if their grades slip. You act as if this is a viable alternative, and will have no effect on chances of further education. Repeating a grade shows up on transcripts, and it becomes more of a red flag to universities when the grade repeat is later in one's academic career. Again, you completely disregard my argument that kids who are paid will gain a sense of apathy for school, as money > learning to a young adolescent mind.

Finally, all you really do in your rebuttal is state your primary argument, that jobs build responsibility. While this may be true for some, for others, jobs may be treated as no more than social gatherings, I'm sure you've seen people just "hanging out" on the job. These jobs, you may argue, should go to people who will actually work instead of hang out. This same argument can be applied to adolescents; if 13 year olds suddenly begin to get jobs, they may start working with each other and begin to slack off and hand out on the job instead of staying in a work-like mindset. Then, you might argue, that these jobs don't belong to these 13 and 14 year olds who are slacking off, but to people who deserve those positions, older kids who'd take jobs a bit more seriously and stay in a work mindset for a longer period of time, due to their advanced brain development, as you have so eloquently stated above.
Debate Round No. 2
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by boots6978 3 years ago
boots6978
Oh I don't mind that no one voted it was a great debate, and there is no need to have votes prove it.
Posted by wolfman4711 3 years ago
wolfman4711
Your welcome, shame no one voted..
Posted by boots6978 3 years ago
boots6978
Thank you wolfman4711 I will remember that next time i post a debate.
Posted by wolfman4711 3 years ago
wolfman4711
U should right with a bigger font..
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