The Instigator
happycamper13
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
dhumphreys17
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should kids be able to bring there phones in class?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/21/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 473 times Debate No: 87025
Debate Rounds (3)
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Votes (0)

 

happycamper13

Pro

I really do not see the harm with kids bringing there phones to class. I am a teenager and in high school and even if the teachers see you phone they get taken away. One time a girl in my class her mom had an emergency, so her mom was trying to contact her. The teacher just took it away and did not care what was going on.
dhumphreys17

Con

I argue that kids should NOT be allowed to bring their cell phones to class. For the purposes of this debate, allow me to define the following terms.

Kids:

For the purposes of this debate, I hereby define "kids" as people attending class at a primary or secondary institution (i.e., elementary, middle or high school). This INCLUDES students over the age of 18 still attending high school while EXCLUDING students in college regardless of age.

Should not be :

The affirmative's definition of "should be" is different from the negative's definition of "should not be" in more than an antonymical sense. By stating that kids "should be" allowed to bring their cell phones to class, the affirmative is noting that this is not currently the status quo (a point backed up by his opening statement, and, at least in my opponent's case, a point which I readily concede).

However, the definition of "should not be" cannot merely be an antonymical rejection of the affirmative's resolution, due to the nuances surrounding the usage of the word "should". The wording "should not be" signifies that I will be arguing against the hypothetical situation in which kids can bring their cell phones to school, even though they are not allowed to do this already. Therefore, although the burden of proof rests on the affirmative because what he or she proposes would change the status quo, I will nonetheless argue as if I have the burden of proof.

Allowed:

This word is crucial to the nature in which this debate takes place. If my opponent had merely postulated that "students should bring their cell phones to class", then administrative rule-setting would have no place in the debate. However, the usage of the word "allowed" introduces administrative rule-setting into the field of discussion on this issue. I will argue that as setters of rules, school administrators have every right and responsibility to set rules conducive to social order, including with regard to cell phones. This course of debate is "allowed" (no pun intended) because the word "allowed" is used in the resolution.

Cell phones:

For the purposes of this debate, I define "cell phone" as an electronic device able to wirelessly communicate with other cell phones owned by other people. This therefore INCLUDES smart watches and the like.

Class:

For the purposes of this debate, I define "class" as a learning session led by a teacher and participated in by at least 2 students, additionally EXCLUDING home-school groups, online schooling, and the like, for reasons to be explained later.

In the upcoming rounds, I will present my arguments and rebut those of my opponents while providing sources for the benefit of the voting public.
Debate Round No. 1
happycamper13

Pro

happycamper13 forfeited this round.
dhumphreys17

Con

dhumphreys17 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
happycamper13

Pro

happycamper13 forfeited this round.
dhumphreys17

Con

dhumphreys17 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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