The Instigator
Pixelberrymc
Pro (for)
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The Contender
Leugen9001
Con (against)
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Should kids be able to have dyed hair at school

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/9/2015 Category: People
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,003 times Debate No: 77482
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
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Pixelberrymc

Pro

Kids (or teens) should be able to have dyed hair. It is their hair, thier life, and their money. I dyed my hair and spent 100$ on it and now school is soon to start and I have to dye it natural again -_- if they are going to make us dye our hair they should pay us, its not illegal for children to dye their hair. So should we be able to?
Leugen9001

Con

Greetings


Hello, pixelberrymc, and thank you for creating this debate. I am looking forward to having a nice, intellectual debate with you. In this round of this debate, I will make a few positive arguments to support my side of the debate, and then attempt to provide adequate rebuttals for your arguments.


On dyed hair and school


Hair dyes are used by many people all around the world for many different purposes: to change their appearance, just for fun, or to cover up grey hair. However, there are many reasons why a student should not dye his or her own hair. First of all, the act of dying one’s hair can distract other students and therefore disrupt classes. Secondly, having dyed hair can lead to bullying or mockery. Finally, hair dye contains substances which may not necessarily be good for the health of school aged children. Students should not have dyed hair at school.


1. Hair dying can be disruptive.


When a student dyes her hair, her peers will inevitably notice that she did so, and therefore become distracted by her dyed hair. Her dyed hair would most likely become the centre of attention for her class for a day or so. This can be disruptive, since one cannot be surprised by her hair and also work on one’s homework at once, as people cannot multitask efficiently. [1] When a large group of people choose to dye their hair a particular colour, hair dying can become a trend and people can become pressured into dying their own hair also. [2] (note: the example in source 2 never escalated into anything unacceptable) This may lead to bullying if the peer pressure escalates.


2. Hair dying can lead to bullying.


When a student dyes her hair an unusual colour, others may pick on her for doing so. Although one may argue that the bullies are the ones at fault, not the student with dyed hair, her dyed hair still would have disrupted things at her classroom.


3. Dying one’s hair is unhealthy.


Most school aged students are, well, fairly young. And young children are the most susceptible to lead poisoning,[4] as their brains are still developing. [3] This makes hair dye unsuitable for children, since the lead acetate in hair dye can end up inside them through a variety of ways. [5] When an adult applies hair dye onto her own hair, she might end up spreading the lead by touching objects which would later end up in the mouth of a small child. That lead would be enough to harm the child. Imagine if said small child had hair dye on her own head.


Rebuttals


Pro argues that teens should be allowed to have dyed hair, since “it’s their hair, their money, and their life”. However, one can also smoke drugs on one’s own money in a way that does not affect others—it’s their own lungs, and their own money; yet this does not make smoking drugs acceptable. Although smoking drugs is obviously different from dying one’s hair, it remains that the fact that an action does not affect others does not make said action acceptable. In other words, the same argument Pro used to defend hair dying can also be used to support smoking drugs, yet smoking drugs is agreed to be bad, making Pro’s argument absurd.


Sources




  1. http://www.scientificamerican.com...

  2. http://www.creators.com...

  3. https://en.wikipedia.org...

  4. https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov...

  5. http://edition.cnn.com...


Debate Round No. 1
Pixelberrymc

Pro

Pixelberrymc forfeited this round.
Leugen9001

Con

Leugen9001 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Pixelberrymc

Pro

Pixelberrymc forfeited this round.
Leugen9001

Con

Leugen9001 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by parkerg27 1 year ago
parkerg27
P.s. Anti-bullying programs in schools suckkkk. If you want to stop bullying then blame governments that don't want to help your children, or parents who don't know how to help their children, or children who don't know how to help themselves.

If you want to:
1) have students focus on learning, get them interested in learning by showing them the rewards of a good education
2) reduce bullying then address root problems and solve them, rather than making the absurd argument that hair color is a major factor in determining who's likely to be bullied
3)improve the health and safety of children then take it up with the corporations and governments which are the most responsible for poisoning you and your child in more ways than I can even list off the top of my head right now

And P.s., justtt because ignorance kind of annoys me when it deals with things which in some way involve legal policies which affect the populations of entire nations, no, all drugs are not bad, in fact many of the most beneficial substances are actually illegal while the least beneficial and most toxic are actually legal. Cannabis, a plant that can cure cancer, fuel cars, build roads and buildings, amongst many other things, is as illegal as heroin, where as most prescription pills that schools and doctors (both bribed, ere, funded by? is that the word?, oh wait, provided incentives by major pharmaceutical corporations), those are totally legal even though they have been proven time and time again to be damaging and even deadly.

To end, let me just point out that the system we live in is actually a huge system of systems, and if we don't address the network of systems as a whole then we'll never have a chance at solving the root problems, only by addressing the foundational problems will we ever have a chance at really making this world a better place.
Posted by parkerg27 1 year ago
parkerg27
Yes, any freedom of expression should not be limited, especially when it comes to public property.

And yes, hair dye is incredibly damaging, attack the laws/politicians who make it legal for corporations to flood their products with toxic chemicals rather than the people who simply want to live their lives and happened to be fooled by corrupt corporations in the pursuit of self-expression.

And distraction comes down to the individual, people who don't want to focus on work will alwaysss be able to find something to distract them from their work such as: doodling, passing notes, staring at the clock, staring out the window on a sunny day, staring out the window on a rainy day, staring out the window on any other day, staring at the blinds on a day where the blinds are covering up the window, randomly looking around the classroom, or their hands, or just plain pretending to listen when really they're daydreaming their class time away. The question isn't about how many shiny things there are for a student to find in the classroom, but the individual's desire to learn and ability to focus. If a student really wants to learn they'll do it with their ghetto parents yelling in the back ground and rap music blaring, but if they don't want to learn then even placing them in the best of environments won't make a bit of significant difference.

If we really want students to be well-educated then they should learn from an early age exactly why they should even be interested in learning in the first place and then once they care enough to learn something provide them with enough freedom to study the things which interest them the most so that they have the duel-benefit of learning more while enjoying their life at the same time. Restricting freedom never promotes any kind of positive growth (unless it's self-restricted), it's only when we expand the freedoms of individuals that they really have a chance to grow the most into their full-potential.
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