The Instigator
The-Voice-of-Truth
Con (against)
Winning
6 Points
The Contender
AtheistPerson
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points

Should kids be allowed to talk when the teacher is talking?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
The-Voice-of-Truth
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/3/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,421 times Debate No: 66269
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (3)
Votes (2)

 

The-Voice-of-Truth

Con

This is a direct challenge to mars4536; however, anyone can accept it.

The topic we are debating is "Should kids be allowed to talk when the teacher is talking?"

I am against kids being able to talk in class when the teacher is talking.

The rules are as follows:

1. Round 1 is acceptance

2. Round 2 is present argument

3. Round 3 is rebuttal

4. Round 4 is conclusion

5. No inappropriate behavior (cussing, insults, etc.)

6. No trolling; this is a serious debate.
AtheistPerson

Pro

In what situations do you think the student should(n't) be able to speak?

1. Having a side conversation with a friend while the teacher is talking.

2. When the teacher is explaining something to the people that his subject applies to.

3. When a student asks another student a related question.

4. When a student sincerely has to use the bathroom and has to call out

5. When the teacher is speaking about a personal experience related or unrelated to the topic.

6. No matter what circumstance
Debate Round No. 1
The-Voice-of-Truth

Con

I believe that students should not be able to talk in class during all of my distinguished opponent's given circumstances except for circumstance 4. If a student sincerely needs to use the bathroom, then they should be able to speak out. In all circumstances, it is disrespectful and frowned upon, but the bathroom situation is an exception.

School, no matter what aspect of it, is preparing you for the real world. Whether it is working, behaving in a proper manner and instilling common etiquette skills. I will support my arguments using real-world examples.

Now, as for students talking during class, talking while a teacher is talking is considered disrespectful. If you talked while your boss was talking to you, or if you were talking during a meeting when someone else was talking, you will more than likely be given a stern warning, and if you keep up showing disrespect to your coworkers and/or bosses, you will be on the fast track to being fired, losing a raise, being demoted or not being promoted. You will have a bad reputation, not only with your coworkers , but also within the workplace.

Many kids claim that they talk during class because they do not want to learn. Oh well, life is tough and unfair, and you will not make it anywhere in the world once you leave high school because you will have to do things that you will not want to or that are very unappealing. Kids do not understand that schools are providing you what you will need in the real world so that you can have a successful life. If you don't want to learn those valuable things, then you are simply making it harder on yourself.

Many more kids say that they talk in class and do not pay attention because they think the class is boring. Whether or not you find a class boring is not anybody’s problem except for yours. If you do not like a class and/or find it boring, suck it up and take it. There are going to be times like that all throughout your life, whether in high school, in college, at work, or even at home. Just face it. Life will always have boring situations and you may not want to do something, and if you do not do what you are told, the only harm done will be done to you, by you.

One last point: students say that talk and do not pay attention because they do not like the teacher. The students say that they want to choose their teachers. Well, if students were permitted to chose their teachers and their classes (which you can sort-of-kind-of do in high school; they give you a little more leeway and are not as strict. Then again, by the time you reach high school, you usually have the sense to be respectful and not talk during class and to pay attention and do your work), they would not be accurately prepared for adult life. In the real world, you cannot choose your boss or the people you work with. If you do not learn what schools are preparing you with, you may have a small choice in the job you want (like what fast-food joint you want to work at), but, regardless of your choice of job, you will more than likely find it boring, and you may look back and wish that you did better in school, and maybe you should not have been talking during class and maybe you should have paid more attention.


Ultimately, school is preparing students for life, for the real world. If students do not value what they are being taught so much as to be disrespectful, then the students must not care about their future. If the students refuse to learn, they are only bringing harm to themselves.
AtheistPerson

Pro

1. Surprisingly, I apply to none of those examples of students that you have listed. Instead, I am one the more ambitious and productive side. I am going to make sure I have a college degree, and I get a good job at being either an astronomer, engineer, philosopher, politician, writer, physicist, or almost anything that has to do with science (except scientology, which is not really even science)

2. I think a student should only be able to talk in certain circumstances, but more than what you think they should. With my previous post, I agree with number 3 and of course, 4.

3. People have to lean over lots of times to their "neighbor" and ask him/her a question. If they had not, in many circumstances he/she would be mostly clueless about the subject the teacher had been talking about because either:
1. The teacher does not allow students to raise there hands even after he/she finishes (actually true for me)
2. The teacher is not heard correctly
3. The student is confused/not understanding

4. Now, let me move on. One of my teachers had a very broad knowledge of math, and the only thing he does is make time wasting and/or discrimination jokes. He does almost everything wrong and tries the least he can to help people in a fair way. Many times, students have interrupted his so called "teaching" to inform him about the right thing. Sometimes, he admits to being wrong and he is thankful for students immediately correcting him. But again, that is sometimes.
1. Now for a smaller example, let's say that the teacher has written a long definition for the wrong words. If a student had not interrupted while he/she was explaining, then everyone might have copied down a whole page of incorrect notes.
2. Now for something that else, let's say that a teacher had been giving a long explanation to why what multiple students had said was correct. If a student had actually been incorrect, and no one was to say anything until the teacher had allowed questions (most likely rarely), everybody would have thought that what the teacher said was right and the majority of the class would erase their answers, and there wouldn't be much of a point in bringing up something that was incorrect from 10 minutes ago.

Here's a nice quote from me; ."School and learning is all about skeptics. Without that, we will be blinded from the truth."
Debate Round No. 2
The-Voice-of-Truth

Con

I applaud my distinguished opponent for not falling into any of those categories; it shows that he has a respect for others. I too, do not fall into any of the given categories.


Ok, now on to the rebuttal:


As previously stated, I agree that if a kid sincerely needs to go to the bathroom, he or she should be able to speak up and let the teacher know. I also think that the teacher should grant the student his or her wish to go. This situation is the only acceptable time to talk while the teacher is talking.


Now, let me discuss your argument (People have to lean over lots of times to their "neighbor" and ask him/her a question. If they had not, in many circumstances he/she would be mostly clueless about the subject the teacher had been talking about) and the reasons you gave (1. The teacher does not allow students to raise there hands even after he/she finishes (actually true for me). 2. The teacher is not heard correctly. 3. The student is confused/not understanding).


1. The teacher does not allow students to raise there hands even after he/she finishes.


You indicated that this scenario actually relates to you. I, however, have not heard of nor experienced this. That does not mean that it does not happen. You have opened my eyes to a new situation, thank you. In this specific situation, since you revealed it to me, I too agree that a student should be able to talk, only if the student asks another student a question pertaining to the topic quietly and respectful to the teacher that is talking.


2. The teacher is not heard correctly.


If the teacher is not heard correctly, then a student does not have to talk out during class. A student can simply raise his or her hand and wait for acknowledgement from the teacher. If, in the case the teacher does not immediately acknowledge the student or does not do so at all due to the teacher not being able to see the student's hand, then the student can simply approach the teacher, get his or her attention, and ask the question he or she has. If the teacher does not allow for the student's question to be answered, then the student can go and ask another student for their interpretation of what the teacher said, as the teacher would more than likely not be talking anymore because he or she would be finished teaching. This goes back to situation 1.


Now, the teacher should be able to teach a class effectively, and a teacher should also be able to tell when a student cannot understand. Plus, a good teacher should repeat his-or herself multiple times to ensure that the class understands, so that what he or she says is not misinterpreted or misunderstood. If a teacher cannot do so, then he or she has no place in the classroom, and their credentials should be revoked.


3. The student is confused/not understanding.


This situation pertains to situation 2, and, in turn, situation 1. The teacher should be able to discern when the class understands and when it (or any one individual within the class) does not. The teacher should repeat his-or herself multiple times and then should ask the class (and each and every individual student) if they understand the material and the lesson that has been taught. That is what teachers do while they are in training; it is basically instilled into them.


Ok, I will now regard your statement "One of my teachers had a very broad knowledge of math, and the only thing he does is make time wasting and/or discrimination jokes. He does almost everything wrong and tries the least he can to help people in a fair way." He should not be a teacher. If you still have him, I would suggest reporting him the school administration, as he is not fit to teach. Now, I had a teacher in 9th grade the always told stories and jokes, but they always somehow related to what we were learning. If this is what your teacher did, then he is worthy of teaching, but it seems that this is not the case. You also say that students interrupted him and told him what is right. Good for them, they spoke out with a reasonable cause. Now, I did not specify this, and I guess I should have, but this debate was to discuss whether students should talk in class without a reasonable cause (such as talking about basketball when your teacher is teaching should be learning).


I will now address your argument "...let's say that the teacher has written a long definition for the wrong words. If a student had not interrupted while he/she was explaining, then everyone might have copied down a whole page of incorrect notes."A teacher knows better than to copy down long definitions for the wrong words. A teacher needs to know the terms of the topic they are teaching, and they are tasked to know the reliability of their sources. A teacher totally screwing up the terms of their topics is a very, and I mean VERY unlikely situation.


As for your statement "...let's say that a teacher had been giving a long explanation to why what multiple students had said was correct. If a student had actually been incorrect, and no one was to say anything until the teacher had allowed questions (most likely rarely), everybody would have thought that what the teacher said was right and the majority of the class would erase their answers..." If a teacher was explaining why multiple students were correct (as the teacher knows the material he or she is teaching), there will be no students that are wrong. This is because the given explanation is a reliable one. If no one was to speak up if this situation was to ever occur to when the students are present, and no one asks questions until after the teacher has spoken, why would the students change their answers? I do not even know what their answers are for. Is it class notes? Homework that they should have done the night before? Is it class work that covers topics that the teacher covered that can also be referred to in the textbook?


I just raised another point. If any of these few situations were to arise (not understanding, misinterpretation, etc.), the students can just reference the textbooks. More often than not, the textbooks explain material more clearly than the teacher explained the material. If a student does not take the initiative to understand the material, no matter what the situation may be, the fault inevitably falls upon the shoulders of the student.


There would be a great point in bringing up a previously discussed topic in a classroom if the subject needs further discussion or if it is in the need of clarification. It would be good, no, it would be beneficial to the students, so that the students fully understand the topic. Due to the fact that the students would understand the topic, their grades and other scores, such as standardized testing scores , EOC scores, and MAP/Discovery Test scores. The students would pass the class and would be successful.


I end this rebuttal by saying that the situations given above are rare, if not extremely rare; they are very unlikely to happen. Ultimately, there are many different ways around these few given situations (which, as stated previously, are rare in themselves). If a student does not try his or her hardest to learn and fully understand the material being taught and the current topic being covered, it is their fault, and there is no way that the students can be helped; that is, except for the students learning from their mistakes and doing their best to make amends, and to strive for better grades and accomplish their goals, both academic and personal.

AtheistPerson

Pro

I don't think I can keep this debate up any longer. You have put out nice supports and reasons, and I am very pleased to have attempted a debate with you. You have great manners and are very respectful. I am certainly sorry to not have been able to finish a full debate. Maybe we can debate another time?
Debate Round No. 3
The-Voice-of-Truth

Con

I too am pleased that I could debate this topic with you; I truly enjoyed doing this debate. I do agree that it would be nice to debate again sometime. Thank you for your generosity. You also composed yourself very well, thank you.
Debate Round No. 4
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by The-Voice-of-Truth 2 years ago
The-Voice-of-Truth
Please vote after the debate is over. I have yet to win or lose a debate; the only other one I have done was a tie due to the fact that no one voted. I am not promoting any side of this debate (just in case there are people that think I am asking for votes), I am simply requesting that whoever sees this will vote and vote honestly.

Thank you.
Posted by The-Voice-of-Truth 2 years ago
The-Voice-of-Truth
The 5-day period is now null and void. It no longer exists; it has been repealed.
Posted by The-Voice-of-Truth 2 years ago
The-Voice-of-Truth
Feel free to comment and let me know if you want to accept. After the 5-day period, I will message you and let you know that the debate is open.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Leo.Messi 2 years ago
Leo.Messi
The-Voice-of-TruthAtheistPersonTied
Agreed with before the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
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Total points awarded:60 
Reasons for voting decision: There is more order in the classroom if the class does not interrupt.
Vote Placed by Kylar 2 years ago
Kylar
The-Voice-of-TruthAtheistPersonTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: I award 1 point to Con but both sides had good conduct, good spelling and they were good at sourcing things and being civil in their arguments.