The Instigator
TakeOutSun7
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Ariesx
Con (against)
Winning
3 Points

Should kids be aloud to play video games during school nights?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Ariesx
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/1/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 445 times Debate No: 87462
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (1)

 

TakeOutSun7

Pro

I have heard many say Yes and many say No, so I come to you guys today to get your opinion(s) on the topic. If you are against then please state why, but if you are for then also please state why. If you would like to, please comment about if kids were aloud to play video games, which ones do you think they should play.
Ariesx

Con

As a fellow gamer, I know that playing video games when one has to wake up between 5 and 7 is very stressful. A lot of people assume no significant impact is made when kids stay up late. I offer these terms:
Kids-a child or young person.(I will count people below the age of 17 if Pro agrees).
Aloud-1.admit (an event or activity) as legal or acceptable:
School Nights-Nights when school is after that specific night
Oxford Dictionaries

Sleep-As I have stated, I believe people underestimate the necessity of 8 to 10 hours of sleep. I will give the reasons why:
1. Lack of sleep leads to a bad day. This is probably the most obvious reason, and I think a great majority of people have experienced this. One will usually grouch and be unproductive which will be very harmful to that child's education.
2. Sleep will also improve decision making skills. If you are having problems opening you eyes; the chances are that your decision-making skills will be negatively affected. "The tendency to throw reason to the wayside has to do with a lack of impulse control induced by sleep deficiency, says Matthew P. Walker, PhD, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. It weakens the connection between the amygdala, the part of the brain that regulates emotions, and the prefrontal cortex, the part that makes most high-level decisions for the body."
3. Sleep also decreases anxiety. This was a study published by the Journal of Neuroscience which stated "It"s almost as if the brain was having a disproportionately increase or an exaggerated response to something bad when you"re sleep deprived.".
4. Sleep refreshes your immune system. Sleep does not only refresh your brain, but it also effects your immune system.
"Day and night are characterized by completely different spectra of physiological functions," Dr. Mazzoccoli says. "And the immune system is absolutely directed by these distinctions of periods."
5. Sleep stabilizes blood sugar. In general, shorter sleepers have a higher probability of having the risk of diabetes." When studying a small group of normal sleepers, researchers in Los Angeles found that even just three nights of "catch-up sleep" to make up for what was lost over the week resulted in a 31% improvement in insulin sensitivity, compared to those who continued to have poor sleep schedules."
6. Sleep lowers your risk of disease. Short sleepers tend to have higher cholesterol levels and blood pressure. This has been proven in almost every example.
http://www.prevention.com...
Now, that I have covered the benefits of sleeping; I will now cover how technology negatively affects the ability to acquire 8 hours of sleep.
Video Games, Phones, and Computers have basically ruined 95% of Americans' ability to sleep according to a new sleep poll.
"The study"s primary conclusion is that Americans don"t get enough sleep overall, and that the sleep they do get is largely rubbish. Waking up several times throughout the night, waking up too early, snoring like a truck, etc.
As Ric Flair once asked, what"s causing all this? Blame technology. As mentioned, fully 95 percent of Americans use a communications device in the hour before going to bed. That"s a critical hour, too, since ideally you"d be winding down before going to bed. Texting your friends, trolling Facebook, reading Charlie Sheen tweets, etc. All of this mental stimulation essentially keeps your brain awake, and prevents the release of a certain hormone that tells your body, "Hey it"s time to go to bed. Get tired."
http://techcrunch.com...
Debate Round No. 1
TakeOutSun7

Pro

You mainly focused on sleep. What about if the student played at 4:00 to 7:00? That's not interfering with their bedtime. Yes I agree under 17 should get 8-10 hours of sleep, but what if they go to bed at 10:00pm and wake up at 10:00am? That's 12 hours of sleep and they still played video games. I understand what you are saying, but do you think that there could be certain video games that are good to be played on school nights?
Ariesx

Con

Thank you again for starting this debate.
"What about if the student played at 4:00 to 7:00?"
Well, there is a problem there. You disrupt valuable time for a child to do homework, and other activities. Also, I touched on this argument in the previous round:
Video Games, Phones, and Computers have basically ruined 95% of Americans' ability to sleep according to a new sleep poll.
"The study"s primary conclusion is that Americans don"t get enough sleep overall, and that the sleep they do get is largely rubbish. Waking up several times throughout the night, waking up too early, snoring like a truck, etc.
As Ric Flair once asked, what"s causing all this? Blame technology. As mentioned, fully 95 percent of Americans use a communications device in the hour before going to bed. That"s a critical hour, too, since ideally you"d be winding down before going to bed. Texting your friends, trolling Facebook, reading Charlie Sheen tweets, etc. All of this mental stimulation essentially keeps your brain awake, and prevents the release of a certain hormone that tells your body, "Hey it"s time to go to bed. Get tired."
Video Games have been empirically and scientifically proven to make a kid stay up longer and longer. I think we all know this feeling. This happened to me, and I bet my opponent over the summer. Each night, I would stay up late playing video games. Each night, I stayed up longer and longer. Now, I felt that it was perfectly acceptable, because I did get 8 hours of sleep, and it was a school night. Con is arguing school days. If hypothetically speaking, A parent allows a kid to play during week days 4 to 7. The kid is going to eventually develop a hunger to play the game for more and more hours. This is unacceptable, and I have provided the harms of this above.
Debate Round No. 2
TakeOutSun7

Pro

TakeOutSun7 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by W00DS 12 months ago
W00DS
Should it not depend on the child
Posted by JaanVahl 1 year ago
JaanVahl
Believe me, when a child wants to play video games during the night, the only way you can stop him or her is if you remove their computer. Not to say i advocate the smashing of computers against the will of the user, but when a child is determined to do play games when he/she is supposed to be asleep, close to nothing you say can convince them otherwise, unless you use threats of course(which is a great way of getting your kid stressed).
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Leugen9001 1 year ago
Leugen9001
TakeOutSun7AriesxTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Arguments go to Con. In rounds 1 and 2, Con argued that playing video games during school nights is harmful because it impedes sleep. To clash with Con's point, Pro argued that in some cases, playing video games doesn't impede sleep. Pro's argument was successfully refuted by Con, who argued that even if it doesn't impede sleep, it impedes schoolwork. Plus, letting a child play games in a way that doesn't impede sleep could turn into playing and getting one's sleep impeded because games make you stay up longer. Thus, Con's constructive case stood. Coupled with the fact that Pro didn't have a construcctive case and only made refutations, Con won in terms of arguments.