The Instigator
EkhEkh
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Broad.Wins
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should school houses be mixed?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/8/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 236 times Debate No: 90873
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
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EkhEkh

Pro

My house believes that houses should be mixed. Do you?

Give some arguments
Broad.Wins

Con

One of the basic tenets of the HeadsUp! Approach is that school should be more like life. Where in life do we strictly segregate people into one-year age groupings? Imagine a corporation organized such that all thirty-somethings were on one floor, with all the thirty-two-year-olds in one room, separated by a wall from the thirty-three-year-olds. Imagine an airline boarding all the seventy-plus-year-olds first, then the sixty-year-olds, the fifty-year-olds, and finally the teens traveling alone.
The fact is that for the most part, age rarely matters, except in schools and a few other areas such as athletic competitions, in which differences in age can create unfair advantages due to physical maturity. Physical traits are often related to age, as is experience (because most three-year-olds have three years of life experience). However, intellectual abilities"which schools are intended to help develop"are not linked to age.

It is not clear why schools are segregated by age. After all, the original one-room schoolhouse on the American frontier was not age-segregated. Some historians suggest that age segregation derives from the influence of military trainers who would take recruits through training one step at a time, so that recruits of a certain vintage all remained together. Others have suggested that the age segregation exists in schools because it is a simple, objective grouping-criterion that avoids judgment and distinction. In that way, it is similar to that used in thoroughbred horse racing, in which all horses are given the birth date of January 1 of the year in which they were born. This presents a problem for the horses, too, since a horse born on December 31 is considered one year old the next day, and is then compared with other horses born up to 364 days earlier.

The problem is that age segregation works well for students in the middle of the group in terms of ability. However, those who are developing faster or who are older must be pulled back to the pace of the whole group and are often frustrated by their inability to move forward; those who are developing more slowly or are younger may feel left behind and lost.

Fortunately, there is an easy solution to the dilemma. Unfortunately, very few schools make use of it.
Debate Round No. 1
EkhEkh

Pro

EkhEkh forfeited this round.
Broad.Wins

Con

Broad.Wins forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
EkhEkh

Pro

EkhEkh forfeited this round.
Broad.Wins

Con

Broad.Wins forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by missbailey8 1 year ago
missbailey8
Lollolol
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