The Instigator
jacktstrick
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
ColeTrain
Pro (for)
Winning
11 Points

Should school prayer be allowed?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
ColeTrain
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/15/2015 Category: Religion
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 750 times Debate No: 68409
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (11)
Votes (3)

 

jacktstrick

Con

In school, it isn't just people who want to pray. School is full of so many faiths, that if you bring religion into anything, there will be someone who doesn't believe in it, and will either be offended, or take legal action, which in turn will cause problems for the school. Everyone should believe that their faith is right, no matter how many facts prove it's wrong.
ColeTrain

Pro

I would like to thank my opponent for opening this debate, and allowing me the privilege to accept. That being said, let's begin.

Prayer is Important:

There are many faiths in which prayer is prominent. As people should be allowed to be themselves, and as that ideology is promoted around the world as important, we shouldn't restrict individuals from praying. If it is in their faith, it is likely something they are required to do, or in the least, should. This being true, we need to realize that disallowing prayer in school forces them to do the opposite of what they have been taught.

When considering a situation such as this, we have to weigh the benefits with the harms. My opponent mentioned that some people could be offended because of prayer. However, he has failed to even bring up the idea of prayerful people being offended by the practices still allowed by other religions, and the offense that is feasibly present when those prayerful individuals are restricted from praying. It appears that my opponent is striving for fairness. He also mentions in a round about way that everyone is entitled to their own opinions. If we allow that to be true, every person who believes in prayer should be allowed to pray at any given time. Their opinion tells them to pray, and that opinion and right shouldn't be attacked by schools.

Constitutionality:

It is explicitly stated in our US Constitution that we should have the freedom of religion, and the freedom of speech. Our First Amendment guarantees our freedom concerning the likes of religion and expression; amongst other things. Considering the fact that most religions involve some sort of prayer, it is vital we understand how such an ideal goes against both personal religious beliefs, but also against guarantees found within our Constitution. As laws are still judged by the Constitution, we should not prohibit prayer in schools.

Conclusion:

Deeply religious students and teachers would all benefit from prayer in schools. An ideology on the forefront of modern society is being expressive, and simply being who you are. However, these dogmas or principles are coming with stipulations not assigned to other beliefs. Instead, prayer and Christian principles are being attacked by the ones promoting individualism, inclusivity, and tolerance. If they want to uphold these values, prayer must also be allowed in public places, such as schools. It is for these reasons, and more, that I would respectfully urge a vote in affirmation of prayer at school.

Once again, thank you for opening the debate, and I wish you the best of luck. :)
Debate Round No. 1
jacktstrick

Con

I honestly see no flaw in your side, you have proved all of my side wrong, and I can't think of anyway around this, so I give up. You really did great good sir or madam.
ColeTrain

Pro

Seeing as my opponent has forfeited the entire debate, I extend my arguments. Thank you for the privilege of allowing me to debate with you, and I wish you the best of luck in any further rounds or debates. :)
Vote pro. :)
Debate Round No. 2
jacktstrick

Con

jacktstrick forfeited this round.
ColeTrain

Pro

My opponent has not given any further arguments, thus I extend my arguments as I urge an affirmative (pro) vote in this debate. :)
Debate Round No. 3
11 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by missmedic 2 years ago
missmedic
In private and on there own time students can pray in school, teachers can too but not with students and not during class and not as a school activity.
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
@missmedic
I understand what you're saying. You've said it 3 times. I get it.
However, you still aren't understanding what I'm saying. The resolution doesn't say the school should endorse prayer, or promote prayer, or lift one religion over another. It simply is asking if students should be allowed to pray at schools.
Posted by missmedic 2 years ago
missmedic
The Supreme Court has long held that the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment forbids school-sponsored prayer or religious indoctrination.
The Constitution forbids not only state practices that "aid one religion . . . or prefer one religion over another," but also those practices that "aid all religions" and thus endorse or prefer religion over non-religion.
The Court said: "Laws are made for the government of actions, and while they cannot interfere with mere religious beliefs and opinions, they may with practices."
The fundamental principle underlying these decisions is that the Constitution commands that public schools may not take sides in matters of religion and may not endorse a particular religious perspective or any religion at all.
Posted by jacktstrick 2 years ago
jacktstrick
@missmedic You should be in this debate instead, you made great points.
Posted by Esiar 2 years ago
Esiar
"School is full of so many faiths, that if you bring religion into anything, there will be someone who doesn't believe in it, and will either be offended, or take legal action, which in turn will cause problems for the school."

All you need to do is simply let the child pray to the God they want to pray to. Don't force the Christian to join the Muslim prayer group.
Posted by Esiar 2 years ago
Esiar
A religious child should be able to pray in free time. Not letting them wouldn't be freedom to practice religion.
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
Freedom of religion can and should allow for prayer from students or teachers. The constitution mentions (or the exercise thereof) that the practice in itself should be permissible.
Posted by missmedic 2 years ago
missmedic
The only type of prayer that is constitutionally permissible is private, voluntary student prayer that does not interfere with the school's educational mission. It is also critical to ensure that the religious activity is actually student-initiated, and that no school employee supervises or participates in the activity. Any school promotion or endorsement of a student's private religious activity is unconstitutional.
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
@missmedic You seem to believe that the resolution is forcing people at schools to pray. It is in no way doing such. It is only allowing it if individuals choose to do it.
Posted by missmedic 2 years ago
missmedic
Public schools exist to educate, not to proselytize. Children in public schools are a captive audience. Making prayer an official part of the school day is coercive and invasive. Our public schools are for all children, whether Catholic, Baptist, Quaker, atheist, Buddhist, Jewish, agnostic. The schools are supported by all taxpayers, and therefore should be free of religious observances and coercion. It is the sacred duty of parents and churches to instill religious beliefs, free from government dictation. Institutionalizing prayers in public schools usurps the rights of parents.
School prayer proponents mistake government neutrality toward religion as hostility. The record shows that religious beliefs have flourished in this country not in spite of but because of the constitutional separation of church and state.
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by The-Voice-of-Truth 2 years ago
The-Voice-of-Truth
jacktstrickColeTrainTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Stated above
Vote Placed by 1Credo 2 years ago
1Credo
jacktstrickColeTrainTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture- all points go to Pro.
Vote Placed by MrJosh 2 years ago
MrJosh
jacktstrickColeTrainTied
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Reasons for voting decision: That font is terrible