The Instigator
porcupinesRcool
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
katiesnappy
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should schools be based on IQ levels?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/29/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 934 times Debate No: 39627
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (3)
Votes (0)

 

porcupinesRcool

Pro

I am for the fact that schools should be based on IQ levels! Please comment !!@ THis debate must have 20+ comments before sunday november 3rd!!
katiesnappy

Con

Schools should not be based on IQ levels simply because it does not analyze all aspects of learning capability as well as emotional maturity. If a child is exponentially brighter that his or her peers, the school should supplement that child's intelligence though gifted programs, rather than assign a higher grade level. Doing so would allow the child to grow intellectually without forcing them to adapt to social situations that are beyond their emotional capacity. Placing a ten year-old in ninth grade would introduce them to teenage problems that they would be inept to handle, such as pressure to use drugs and engage in inappropriate behaviors. A young child would also sacrifice their childhood and deny themselves the time to just be a kid, without all of the stresses that come along with being a student in higher grade levels.
Debate Round No. 1
porcupinesRcool

Pro

I am for the fact that schools should be based on IQ levels! In fact they do analyze all the levels of intelligence! THey also help you move up in school and the students in the gifted school will learn more instead of having to share a class with people who have a 20+ IQ point difference
katiesnappy

Con

An IQ test does not analyze an child's rate of learning, mental capacity, or emotional maturity. Although one might argue that school is not a place for socialization, a child who is exceptionally bright and is placed in a class with kids older than him or her, he would be an easier target for bullying because of his innocence. In turn, the child being bullied may not be able to keep up with their schoolwork because of the torment they are receiving from their peers.
Debate Round No. 2
porcupinesRcool

Pro

porcupinesRcool forfeited this round.
katiesnappy

Con

katiesnappy forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
porcupinesRcool

Pro

porcupinesRcool forfeited this round.
katiesnappy

Con

Excuse me, but are you serious in continuing this debate?
Debate Round No. 4
porcupinesRcool

Pro

Are you serious in continuing this debate? Wow my computer broke ok ?sorry
katiesnappy

Con

katiesnappy forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by America1984 3 years ago
America1984
me and you were currently in a debate about the same topic why did you just start a new one all of a sudden?
Posted by KaleBevilacqua 3 years ago
KaleBevilacqua
This sounds like a fascinating debate. I believe in a restructuring of the educational system to include more holistic, non-traditional aspects, so this seems like something I'll follow.

Con's argument seems a bit shaky, though. Schools are not a venue for socialization, but a place to learn. Also, Con provides no evidence of her claim--that children in higher-level academic settings will be exposed to mature peer pressure. Also, there's a bit of a fault in her reasoning: if the classes are segregated by IQ, not age, then who's to say that young kid will only be surrounded by older kids?
Posted by SloppyJoe6412 3 years ago
SloppyJoe6412
I slightly disagree with your position but not enough to take the opposite view, so I am voicing my objection as a comment only: while it is correct that schools should function as a social integration tool including children of many different levels, some minimal standards are needed, and actually deserved by both brilliant and not so brilliant kids. Case in point: say a child cannot follow the basic curricula for his given grade. I am not saying "having difficulty in", I mean when a child can't even participate of the class. What is the point of keeping him/her in it? The only likely outcome is frustration for him/herself, and limiting the time the teacher can dedicate to the rest of the class.
No votes have been placed for this debate.