The Instigator
123haha
Con (against)
Tied
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The Contender
jglass841
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Should schools conduct random drug testing?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/3/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 676 times Debate No: 85986
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (3)
Votes (0)

 

123haha

Con

Hello, I believe that drug testing in schools should not be allowed to occur. In a national study by the University of Chicago, 76,000 students were surveyed and there was no correlation between the drug use of students that went to schools that conducted drug testing and those that did not. Based on this study and many many more, drug testing is simply not an efficient deterrent.
Next, drug testing is inaccurate. Based on several statistics, (that I will name if necessary), drug tests can bring up false positives on students who are not actually using illicit drugs. Drug tests can pick up measly medications which will give the student a false positive result, and miss several mainstream painkillers and illicit substances that are less detectable. Not only is this a waste of time and money, (drug tests cost about $42 a piece, if a school is not federally funded for drug tests this can really add up...), but it presumes that a student is guilty based off of inaccurate results. The student may then be forced to explain themselves/their medical issues so that they will not be suspended from extracurriculars or school itself. Why are we wasting (under the assumption) NOT federally funded money on inaccurate tests?
Drug testing is a careless and futile way to attempt to deter youth from illicit substances. However, it all comes down to the mentality of that child when it comes to drug use and their attitudes/perceptions of it. You may be able to temporarily scare children out of using drugs, but you will not change their perception of using them. I see it as we are wasting our time drug testing kids, when we could be informing them of the physical/bodily consequences of illicit substances, he effects it has on family and others around you, where to get help, etc... Setting a tone of "nontolerance" among students does nothing but breed resent among them.
jglass841

Pro

Hello, I am in college, and have seen many students using a variety of drugs , with virtually no help available to them. I believe schools should use drug tests, because they should be able to assist the students who are using drugs, not to just deter drug use. Early detection of the presence of drugs is essential to help students who are struggling with drugs. As for the problem of them being inaccurate, oral testing has proven as a non-invasive way to test for drugs, that is highly accurate. In an article by Olaf H. Drummer, he explains that oral testing is extremely effective due to the small samples collected.
Debate Round No. 1
123haha

Con

I agree that help should be available to drug users, but randomly flagging innocent students until one day you just get lucky and come across a user is frankly a waste of time and energy. By the time you actually find one, it may be too late. Providing students with helplines, resources, counsellors, etc...should be the way to go. As for oral testing, not every student is comfortable with being orally prodded, having their DNA and bodily fluids collected, and tested in the blink of an eye with repercussions if they fail to comply. As for the oral tests, due to a good amount of schools and universities not being federally funded for drug testing, these "highly accurate" tests are without a doubt adding up to the school's yearly costs. Changing public attitude and behavioral acceptance of drug use and providing support channels for all students will be more effective than randomly drug testing individuals until one is caught.
Also, if students are subjected to random drug testing and actually fear for it, wouldn't they turn to something less detectable but equally as addicting such as alcohol or cigarettes? College age students may also have legal rights to partake in alcoholic consumption and buy cigarettes due to their age. To wrap it up, scaring students with drug tests does not get down to the roots of the real issue, perception.
jglass841

Pro

I believe that these should be implemented only when they are made accurate enough to be reasonably used. Students should take the oral tests, but also have a chance to tell about any drugs they have taken in advance, such as painkillers, to avoid suspicion. As for the issue of privacy, schools should have the right to test their students, in order to enforce a drug free policy. Students should have to comply with this policy, in the same way that schools can search backpacks, or suitcases, that are on their grounds. As for the costs, in the article "Breaking Down School Budgets", by Marguerite Roza, public schools spend about 22.4% less money on education, due to the recent change in curriculum. That money can easily be spent on drug testing, to enforce school policies.
Debate Round No. 2
123haha

Con

You suggest that students should have a chance to explain any medications they may take to avoid any confusion, and in the scenario where a drug test would be being conducted, I agree. However, not ever student is comfortable with explaining their medications and/or why they are taking them. Little Jimmy may not be entirely up for explaining why he's taking Videx or Truvada for his HIV. Some students may not be comfortable with explaining their medications or sharing their medical information out loud for obvious reasons.
You say that schools should be allowed to drug test students because they stand on their property. So if somebody comes to your house that gives you the right to drug test them? Because they're in your realm? I hope you can see how invading a student's privacy by taking bodily fluids, oral samples, etc... and presuming them guilty when they fail to comply differs from a simple locker or backpack check.
As for money, schools could instead be using that money to implement useful resources and programs for students who are dependent on drugs instead of using scare tactics to perform a temporary prevention. Drug testing is a lazy, quick, and careless tactic in order to try and deter drug use instead of taking the time to get to the roots of the issue.
jglass841

Pro

jglass841 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
123haha

Con

123haha forfeited this round.
jglass841

Pro

I state that schools should be able to drug test their students. This is because students are on government property, in the case of public schools. This means that they should be able to search their students, which involves drug testing as well. The students' decision to state drugs that they are taking is for their privacy as well, to not alarm the administrators of the test. A person with medication at school has to explain his or herself, likewise a person with drugs in their system should have to explain his or herself. In order to maintain a safe environment at schools, students should be drug tested. The schools have the right to search students. This can be thought of as a new way to enforce that right.
Debate Round No. 4
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by jglass841 1 year ago
jglass841
Great debate, with evidence on both sides. You presented some good arguments. I had fun.
Posted by 123haha 1 year ago
123haha
Well turns out many schools across America have implemented random drug testing in schools. I would research your argument a bit more before commenting. In a court case it was passed as constitutional to conduct drug testing among athletes and students who partook in extracurricular activities.
Posted by Troller808 1 year ago
Troller808
This a stupid argument because it is unconstitutional to do this. See the 4th amendment, if they did pass this law then the education board would be definitely sued.
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