The Instigator
Emily1358
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
dysgustophanes
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points

Should teachers be able to control everything you do in school?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
dysgustophanes
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/25/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 457 times Debate No: 87215
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (3)
Votes (3)

 

Emily1358

Con

I don't think teachers should be able to control every single thing you do in school. They should be able to control reasonable things, yes, but definitely not completely taking your life over in school.
dysgustophanes

Pro

For this to happen in it's purest form, it would be akin to a robot like Hal 9000, or an AI being programmed to do what it is being created to do. Since the dawn of time, people have been suppressed, subjugated... controlled. The neanderthals, the boskop man, the hobbit people--homo floresiensis--have to some extent been litigated against, harbored, and destroyed in contest to us: man kind. Since people have been people, there have been those who wish to control us. I believe this is an undying characteristic represented in the human population.

The psychopathic religious despots depicted in early 20th century films of the Aztecs and Incas, the politician with no gall who is ever eager to deny the truth, fully knowing it exists, in place of his own opinion and stratagem. Since ever, there have been a will against the meek, the unlearned and the youthful.

Now I will supplement why, at our current level, it is impossible for a teacher to fully control a student, and then consider your argument in it's practical usefulness as a form of justice in the education of our children. Think of multiple choice answers. You must choose one, yes? It is your choice?

At the very beginning of most peoples schooling, say 1st grade: teachers remark at the inevitability of medias influence on a person. She will say that everyone is influenced by this, at least most people. To not be influenced by advertising techniques now almost a century in its veritable requiem, would stand to mark you as the same as any psychopathic despot of South America or a modern politician with no compunctions or moral qualms.

Certainly a teacher can't control everything you do, right? Wrong. At a university level it is commonplace for a student to follow stringent guidelines necessary to fulfill what has been set in place by Joseph Baldwin as a measure to instill not only the subject matter at hand, but a necessary alignment of the given student's aptitudes, capacities necessary to function in a working environment or scientific endeavor. To be scrupulous in ones dedication to their subject is one such trait that is required to be fulfilled in a higher education, and one such that not everyone desiring such an education can fulfill.

Now... I will say that this is not a perfect system. To be honest, we are probably forfeiting much promise in our population through this rigorous yet highly selective process which has been found necessary to fulfill in order to attain a degree. But what about at a [i]perfect[/i] level? One where, say, a child of 10 or 12 years old could lie down on a table, have a circuit-board strapped up to the brain, and have the entirety of medical knowledge then available transmitted into their memory, a repertoire made functional in the individual within a few minutes in comparison to what would take perhaps multiple decades in the average prospective student in present day? Certainly this would need to be controlled, yes? Perhaps the knowledge would look the same no matter the individual explaining to a person selected for a different variety of expertise, based on whatever criteria made-up at that point in the, perhaps-distant future. This is a matter that not only would need to be controlled to work, but at an extreme level.

I'll now present a less stringent, and less subjective take of what the above paragraph might look like in modern times! First, I'll cite the book Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card. The camp that the children enter--they being selected out of many for their brilliance--puts huge controls on what happens during their training. Similarly, in a Navy SEALs recruit training, an initial indoctrination where few candidates actually make it, the entire 6 month experience is controlled to a T. From the time they're woken up by water being splashed in their face until the time they collapse into their bed that can bounce a quarter dollar if you drop it on it, their endeavor is scrutinized and probed my officers who have succeeded in the program before them. The Navy SEALs are some of the most highly skilled combatants in the modern world. But only a few of them make it out.

In an ideal society, I would say that every aspect of "schooling" (or what it would be known as then) should be controlled. In a technocratic utopia where the goal of everyone doing whatever they please without qualms is implemented, only a small fraction of people would be selected to run maintenance on the AI supporting the structure within which the population would exist. And in order to be able to undertake such maintenance and updates, these people would need to be educated at the level or even much beyond that of those professionals currently working in the field. Though the direction I am taking this is perhaps represented solely in an abstract philosophical context, that's the direction I've chosen to take.
Debate Round No. 1
Emily1358

Con

Emily1358 forfeited this round.
dysgustophanes

Pro

I have decided to re-assert the above notions that I decided to present in response to the instigator's forfeiture of the second round, in addition to further (much more liberally predicated) examples for my argument.

Consider that the human race, in 100,000 years time or more perhaps, has evolved. Our bodies and brains now resemble our conception of the little green men in early science fiction movies ratify. These alien beings as we see them, represent advanced intelligence, progression far from our own on a level concerning evolution, representing a further level of intellectual ability as far as humans are today.

Flying saucers are another phenomenon, related to this little green man. Those who create them have to have gone through some schooling, no? Maybe even these are of a lower level of ability than exist much of the aliens in this rhetoric, such that the knowledge to create such space craft is nearly intrinsic, as would be today be most similar to an autodidact who formulates his or her own system of physics, math, etc., as in the case of Christopher Landon, the man with one of the highest recorded IQ's in history.

Would their education, if required at all for such a being, necessarily be more stringent than ours? Perhaps they do not possess natural abilities of engineering such required to create space craft. Perhaps, even though existing at a lower echelon of aptitude than most of their brethren, these advanced humanoids undergo--in comparison to today--an extremely intensive form of education, resembling only what we could recognize as a program for child prodigies, ivy league honors programs, et al?

Try to envision a human undergoing this process of learning, if you will. It might inhabit a degree of control that, to us, extends far beyond the facility of the capacity of our brain. It may simply be too difficult, or at some extension too demanding, draconian, linear. But to these aliens I speak of, it's just a natural course of what we know as education to fulfill their role in /their/ society as what may very well be that of a lower-class mind.

Think on this, in addition to what I have previously posted, and formulate a response if you will. Thank you for reading.
Debate Round No. 2
Emily1358

Con

Emily1358 forfeited this round.
dysgustophanes

Pro

There's nothing else I have to say.
Debate Round No. 3
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by RosalieSC 1 year ago
RosalieSC
Your question is a little unclear, do you mean everything in school or everything at home and in school? What kind of things would teachers be able to control?
Posted by SocialDemocrat 1 year ago
SocialDemocrat
It is so unclear what you are referring to. You make it sound like fascism but you're talking about teachers in a school.
Posted by bhakun 1 year ago
bhakun
What do you mean taking over your life? Giving you homework?
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by fire_wings 1 year ago
fire_wings
Emily1358dysgustophanesTied
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Reasons for voting decision: FF.
Vote Placed by JustAnotherFloridaGuy 1 year ago
JustAnotherFloridaGuy
Emily1358dysgustophanesTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture.
Vote Placed by U.n 1 year ago
U.n
Emily1358dysgustophanesTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture